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Recordings & Discussions of Other Vocal Works: Main Page | Motets BWV 225-231 | Mass in B minor BWV 232 | Missae Breves & Sanctus BWV 233-242 | Magnificat BWV 243 | Matthäus-Passion BWV 244 | Johannes-Passion BWV 245 | Lukas-Passion BWV 246 | Markus-Passion BWV 247 | Weihnachts-Oratorium BWV 248 | Oster-Oratorium BWV 249 | Chorales BWV 250-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-523 | Quodlibet BWV 524 | Aria BWV 1127

Johannes-Passion BWV 245
Conducted by Masaaki Suzuki

V-4

J.S. Bach: Johannespassion BWV 245

Johannes-Passion BWV 245

Masaaki Suzuki

Bach Collegium Japan

Tenor [Evangelist & appendix]: Gerd Türk; Bass [Jesus]: Michio Tatara; Soprano: Midori Suzuki; Soprano: Yumiko Kurisu; Counter-tenor: Yoshikazu Mera; Counter-tenor: Akira Tachikawa; Tenor [Arias & Diener]: Koki Katano; Bass [Petrus & Pilatus]: Kenji Mizuno; Soprano [Maid]: Aki Yanagisawa; Tenor: Akira Takizawa

King Records

Apr 1995

2-CD / TT: 105:47

The ’Ordinary’ Version. 1st recording of Johannes-Passion BWV 245 by M. Suzuki. Recorded live at Casals Hall, Tokyo - Bach Collegium Japan 18th Subscription Concert.
Buy this album at:

V-5

J.S. Bach: Johannes-Passion (St. John Passion), BWV 245

Johannes-Passion BWV 245

Masaaki Suzuki

Bach Collegium Japan

Tenor [Evangelist & appendix]: Gerd Türk; Bass [Jesus]: Chiyuki Urano; Soprano: Ingrid Schmithüsen; Counter-tenor: Yoshikazu Mera; Tenor [Arias & Diener]: Makoto Sakurada; Soprano [Maid]: Yoshie Hida; Bass [Petrus & Pilatus]: Peter Kooy

BIS

Apr 1998

2-CD / TT: 110:19

Version IV 1749 + 3 Arias from Version II 1725. 2nd recording of Johannes-Passion BWV 245 by M. Suzuki. Recorded at the Kobe Shoin Women's University Chapel, Japan.
Buy this album at: Amazon.com | Amazon.com

V-6

J.S. Bach: Johannespassion BWV 245

Johannes-Passion BWV 245

Masaaki Suzuki (Conductor & Harpsichord)

Bach Collegium Japan

Tenor [Evangelist]: Gerd Türk; Bass [Jesus]: Stephan MacLeod; Soprano: Midori Suzuki; Counter-tenor [Alto Arias]: Robin Blaze; Bass [Pilate]: Chiyuki Urano

TDK

July 2000

DVD / TT: 116:16

3rd recording of Johannes-Passion BWV 245 by M. Suzuki. Recorded & filmed at Suntory Hall, Tokyo, Japan.
Buy this album at: Amazon.com

St. John Passion: Suzuki vs. Gardiner

Ryan Michero wrote (April 2, 1999):
*** BEWARE! Another one of Ryan's really long reviews follows. ***

Well, I've spent some of my spare time this week preparing another entry in my Suzuki review series for you all. In fact, this is a special review because I've been listening to Suzuki's new St. John Passion recording and comparing it to my previous favorite St. John recording by John Eliot Gardiner. And I'm ready to write about it just in time for Good Friday!

As you all know, I'm an admirer of Suzuki's ongoing complete cantata series. I've been excited at the prospect of Suzuki and the Bach Collegium Japan recording Bach's larger vocal works, yet I wasn't sure that they could compete with the more starry major-label recordings of the vocal works. To be more specific, I have loved Gardiner's recordings of the Passions, the B-Minor Mass (BWV 232), and the Christmas Oratorio (BWV 248) for a few years now, and I thought Gardiner's St. John would be tough to beat.

I thought wrong! It's not that Suzuki's version easily defeats Gardiner's; on the contrary, I think Gardiner's recording is equally accomplished. However, Suzuki's version has moments of inspiration and performers of such great talent that Gardiner's version can seem lackluster in comparison.

Gardiner and Suzuki take a similar approach to performing the piece. Both use a smallish choir and an orchestra of period instruments. Both prefer women to boys as sopranos. And both conductors are dynamic interpreters of Bach's vocal music, emphasizing the inherent drama of the work. Gardiner is perhaps a better technician than Suzuki, fine-tuning his performers to get the best out of them. Yet, Suzuki seems to have more range and subtlety, while Gardiner, in spite of his musicality and attention to detail, sometimes misses the deeper emotions of the piece.

Suzuki performs the fourth version of the Passion that Bach compiled, which included a notated harpsichord continuo part in addition to organ and cello (Gardiner only uses organ and cello). In this recording, Suzuki himself plays the majority of the harpsichord parts while conducting. At first I thought the harpsichord in the continuo might be distracting, but as the recording went on, I saw that, while it is not always used, when it is used it adds so much nuance and drama to the piece. It helps with the transitions between "turba" choruses and recitative, it adds punch to dramatic declamations, and it participates in the dialogue between singers and instruments.

Also, while Gardiner's version has a clear, analytical sound, allowing you to hear much of the counterpoint clearly, Suzuki's sound is fuller, warmer, and more reverberant. Sometimes the reverberance hinders Suzuki, as in the opening chorus, which tends to sound a bit muddy. Gardiner is preferable here, the dissonant oboe lines cutting chillingly through the texture. Yet sometimes, the Suzuki's softer sound works beautifully, adding a radiance to the music that is otherwise impossible to achieve. The BCJ's chorales, for instance, are often made more moving by their lush, full sound.

The Monteverdi Choir under Gardiner is obviously a group of tremendously gifted, disciplined singers, and their choral singing is often thrilling. I especially like their distinctive, golden soprano section. The BCJ choir is not as technically impressive, but I do admire their more homogenous, pure sound where the Monteverdi Choir can sound blustery. Both choirs make excellent impressions on these recordings.

What really makes or breaks a Passion performance, though, is the quality of the solo singers, especially the tenor Evangelist. In almost all cases, and to my initial surprise, Suzuki has the upper hand. The bass for the arias and the roles of Peter and Pilate on
Suzuki's recording is Peter Kooij, and he does a wonderful job. There is no contest between Kooij, with his full voice and expressive intensity, and Cornelius Hauptmann on Gardiner's version, who sounds rather weak in comparison. Kooij has what may be the most magical moment on the album: the arioso, No. 19, beginning "Betrachte, meine Seel". It is absolutely breathtaking.

Suzuki has the edge in terms of the alto voice too, but not by much. Yoshikazu Mera sings sings with great confidence and ability, making the most of the two arias he is given. His version of No. 7, "Von den Stricken meiner Suenden", blows Michael Chance's verion away. However, both singers give incredibly powerful performances of "Esist vollbracht". Suzuki's is slower in the first section, more thunderous
in the second; Gardiner's is generally more minimalist and austere throughout. Both linger in the memory long after they are finished. In the end, I slightly prefer Mera because of the warmth and tonal variety in his voice.

Gardiner beats Suzuki with his sopranos, though. Although Ingrid Schmithuesen sings with elegance and a pure tone in her two arias, she can't beat Gardiner's singers. Ruth Holton's charming, boyish voice enriches "Ich folge dir gleichfalls mit freudigen Schritten" (aided by wonderfully articulate flute playing), and Nancy Argenta's touching performance of "ZerflieBe, mein Herze" almost makes it the emotional
centerpiece of Gardiner's recording.

The edge goes back to Suzuki when it comes to tenors, though. Makoto Sakurada is a fine singer, bringing out the nervousness and fear of "Ach, mein Sinn, wo willt du endlich hin" without being annoying, and bringing great tenderness to "Mein Herz, indem die ganze Welt". Neill Archer sounds blustery in comparison.

I've saved the best for last. Gerd Türk is a tenor I've admired before in Suzuki's recordings, but I was wholly unprepared for the gripping performance he gives as the Evangelist in this St. John Passion. I admire Anthony Rolfe Johnson, and he really does a good job in Gardiner's recording. But he just doesn't sing like an Evangelist! He sounds like a good singer singing the part of the Evangelist. Tuerk, in contrast, is completely inside his role. He sounds like an excited narrator eager to tell you his story. His voice is clear and alert, and he adds great immediacy to his lines. Additionally, Suzuki allows him to linger on Bach's passages of tone painting, letting him wring every last bit of emotion out of them.

Türk's tour de force performance coupled with Suzuki's electric conducting make the recitative passages some of the most exciting, crucial moments of the work. All the performers involved in these passages, from Suzuki at the harpsichord to the chorus, seem inspired by the story, making listening to this recording a very gripping and
moving experience. I've never been so touched by the moment Jesus gives one of his disciples to his mother as a son, never been so frightened by the crowd's cries to crucify Jesus and the earthquake at his death. Even Gardiner, acclaimed as master of drama in Bach's Passions, sounds dry in these passages compared to Suzuki.

Now, Gardiner is no slouch. As I said, I prefer Gardiner's sopranos and often his choruses to Suzuki's. I would not want to be without Gardiner's version. But I must say that I now have a new favourite recording of the St. John Passion.

Now, I wonder what Suzuki can do with the St. Matthew (BWV 244)... Or the B-Minor Mass (BWV 232)...

 

St. John Passion: Suzuki vs. Gardiner

Ryan Michero wrote (December 20, 1999):
Well, I've spent some of my spare time this week preparing another entry in my Suzuki review series for you all. In fact, this is a special review because I've been listening to Suzuki's new St. John Passion recording and comparing it to my previous favorite St. John recording by John Eliot Gardiner. And I'm ready to write about it just in time for Good Friday!

As you all know, I'm an admirer of Suzuki's ongoing complete cantata series. I've been excited at the prospect of Suzuki and the Bach Collegium Japan recording Bach's larger vocal works, yet I wasn't sure that they could compete with the more starry major-label recordings of the vocal works. To be more specific, I have loved Gardiner's recordings of the Passions, the B-Minor Mass (BWV 232), and the Christmas Oratorio (BWV 248) for a few years now, and I thought > Gardiner's St. John would be tough to beat.

I thought wrong! It's not that Suzuki's version easily defeats Gardiner's; on the contrary, I think Gardiner's recording is equally accomplished. However, Suzuki's version has moments of inspiration and performers of such great talent that Gardiner's version can seem lackluster in comparison.

Gardiner and Suzuki take a similar approach to performing the piece. Both use a smallish choir and an orchestra of period instruments. Both prefer women to boys as sopranos. And both conductors are dynamic interpreters of Bach's vocal music, emphasizing the inherent drama of the work. Gardiner is perhaps a better technician than Suzuki, fine-tuning his performers to get the best out of them. Yet, Suzuki seems to have more range and subtlety, while Gardiner, in spite of his musicality and attention to detail, sometimes misses the deeper emotions of the piece.

Suzuki performs the fourth version of the Passion that Bach compiled, which included a notated harpsichord continuo part in addition to organ and cello (Gardiner only uses organ and cello). In this recording, Suzuki himself plays the majority of the harpsichord parts while conducting. At first I thought the harpsichord in the continuo might be distracting, but as the recording went on, I saw that, while it is not always used, when it is used it adds so much nuance and drama to the piece. It helps with the transitions between "turba" choruses and recitative, it adds punch to dramatic declamations, and it participates in the dialogue between singers and instruments.

Also, while Gardiner's version has a clear, analytical sound, allowing you to hear much of the counterpoint clearly, Suzuki's sound is fuller, warmer, and more reverberant. Sometimes the reverberance hinders Suzuki, as in the opening chorus, which tends to sound a bit muddy. Gardiner is preferable here, the dissonant oboe lines cutting chillingly through the texture. Yet sometimes, the Suzuki's softer sound works beautifully, adding a radiance to the music that is otherwise impossible to achieve. The BCJ's chorales, for instance, are often made more moving by their lush, full sound.

The Monteverdi Choir under Gardiner is obviously a group of tremendously gifted, disciplined singers, and their choral singing is often thrilling. I especially like their distinctive, golden soprano section. The BCJ choir is not as technically impressive, but I do admire their more homogenous, pure sound where the Monteverdi Choir can sound blustery. Both choirs make excellent impressions on these recordings.

What really makes or breaks a Passion performance, though, is the quality of the solo singers, especially the tenor Evangelist. In almost all cases, and to my initial surprise, Suzuki has the upper hand. The bass for the arias and the roles of Peter and Pilate on Suzuki's recording is Peter Kooij, and he does a wonderful job. There is no contest between Kooy, with his full voice and expressive intensity, and Cornelius Hauptmann on Gardiner's version, who sounds rather weak in comparison. Kooy has what may be the most magical moment on the album: the arioso, No.19, beginning "Betrachte, meine Seel". It is absolutely breathtaking.

Suzuki has the edge in terms of the alto voice too, but not by much. Yoshikazu Mera sings with great confidence and> ability, making the most of the two arias he is given. His version of No.7, "Von den Stricken meiner Sünden", blows Michael Chance's version away. However, both singers give incredibly powerful performances of "Es ist vollbracht". Suzuki's is slower in the first section, more thunderous in the second; Gardiner's is generally more minimalist and austere throughout. Both linger in the memory long after they are finished. In the end, I slightly prefer Mera because of the warmth and tonal variety in his voice.

Gardiner beats Suzuki with his sopranos, though. Although Ingrid Schmithuesen sings with elegance and a pure tone in her two arias, she can't beat Gardiner's singers. Ruth Holton's charming, boyish voice enriches "Ich folge dir gleichfalls mit freudigen Schritten" (aided by wonderfully articulate flute playing), and Nancy Argenta's touching performance of "ZerflieBe, mein Herze" almost makes it the emotional centerpiece of Gardiner's recording.

The edge goes back to Suzukwhen it comes to tenors, though. Makoto Sakurada is a fine singer, bringing out the nervousness and fear of "Ach, mein Sinn, wo willt du endlich hin" without being annoying, and bringing great tenderness to "Mein Herz, indem die ganze Welt". Neill Archer sounds blustery in comparison.

I've saved the best for last. Gerd Türk is a tenor I've admired before in Suzuki's recordings, but I was wholly unprepared for the gripping performance he gives as the Evangelist in this St. John Passion. I admire Anthony Rolfe Johnson, and he really does a good job in Gardiner's recording. But he just doesn't sing like an Evangelist! He sounds like a good singer singing the part of the Evangelist. Türk, in contrast, is completely inside his role. He sounds like an excited narrator eager to tell you his story. His voice is clear and alert, and he adds great immediacy to his lines. Additionally, Suzuki allows him to linger on Bach's passages of tone painting, letting him wring every last bit of emotion out of them.

Türk's tour de force performance coupled with Suzuki's electric conducting make the recitative passages some of the most exciting, crucial moments of the work. All the performers involved in these passages, from Suzuki at the harpsichord to the chorus, seem inspired by the story, making listening to this recording a very gripping and moving experience. I've never been so touched by the moment Jesus gives one of his disciples to his mother as a son, never been so frightened by the crowd's cries to crucify Jesus and the earthquake at his death. Even Gardiner, acclaimed as master of drama in Bach's Passions, sounds dry in these passages compared to Suzuki.

Now, Gardiner is no slouch. As I said, I prefer Gardiner's sopranos and often his choruses to Suzuki's. I would not want to be without Gardiner's version. But I must say that I now have a new favorite recording of the St. John Passion.

Now, I wonder what Suzuki can do with the St. Matthew (BWV 244)... Or the B-Minor Mass (BWV 232)...

 

Suzuki St. John Passion DVD

Armagan Ekici wrote (March 31, 2001):
The DVD of Suzuki's St John Passion broadcast from the anniversary of Bach's death is out (Serial Number is TDK / DV-BAJPN). It is a live recording from Japan, the soloists are Midori Suzuki / Robin Blaze / Gert Trk (Evangelist) / Chiyaki Urano (Pilate) / Stephan MacLeod (Jesus). It was originally broadcasted on German TV as part of the 24 Hours Bach programme.

The recording and the performance is very clean. There is only occassional audience or stage noise, and one or two hints of uncertainty in the soloists' voices. The visuals are a solemn affair, with everybody in designer black suits / dresses. Suzuki with his long white hair makes for good TV; Gerd Trk inserts restrained but effective 'acting' in his facial expressions.

No additions in the DVD except a short interview with Suzuki telling how special it was for him to play Bach from Japan to German audiences and why he likes period instruments.

If you already have their studio CD version, possibly the DVD will not be much interest for you purely on musical terms. However I find the addition of Dolby Digital sound a bonus (with 'ambient sound' coming from the rear speakers as in a concert hall). If you don't have the CD version actually I would suggest to go for the DVD instead; more or less same performance plus the visuals and added sound quality. I also think that this is a very effective medium to introduce somebody to the passions. Because of the recitatives, it takes time to be convinced on the passions on purely musical terms -- if you don't follow the words you simply don't get what the fuss is about. The DVD, with the added visuals to make the recitatives more interesting and the subtitles in four languages, can be a very good educational tool on appreciating the passion.

(That said, some time ago I had seen fragments of an old film of St Matthew Passion (BWV 244). In the background it had a very old recording of Karajan, with a very slow tempo, horrid sound quality and Elisabeth Schwarzkopf in her Richard Strauss vibrato; the visuals consisted of 40-second shots of classical paintings of the passion story in black and white. That movie, of course, can be used as a very effective repellent, if needed).

 

SJP DVD by Suzuki

Kirk McElhearn wrote (February 27, 2002):
Has anyone come across this yet?
http://www.tdk-mediactive.com/music/music.cfm?PL=2&GA=12&SE=1

 

SJP on TV

Kirk McElhearn wrote (March 12, 2002):
Ah, what a pleasure. I just finished watching the second half of the Suzuki SJP on TV (I caught it in the middle - I had forgotten...)

Magnificent! It is everything the CD is and more. The soloists were remarkable, and the choir perfect. Add to that extraordinary sound – even the harpsichord sounded clear - and it was an excellent performance. The penultimate choral movement is the epitome of clarity.

This is the performance that is to be released (soon?) on DVD - I hope to get a review copy of it and tell you more about it. But, if you can, snap this up. It is truly worth it.

 

New from BIS / Suzuki Passions

Kirk McElhearn wrote (March 12, 2002):
I just saw, on a French web site, that Bis are releasing the SJP and SMP (BWV 244) in a box set soon. No date, but it is listed as soon to be released.

For info...

Michael Grover wrote (March 12, 2002):
[To Kirk McElhearn] At BIS's prices, I'll have to get a loan if I want that set. Let's see... 5 CDs... plus tax... close to $100, anyone?

Seriously, though, one would think that with the success of labels such as Naxos and Brilliant Classics, labels like "the majors" and BIS would get a clue. There's a reason why I don't own any Suzuki cantatas, and it's because I have three kids at home to feed. Full price doesn't cut it in the classical CD market anymore. I'm just grateful for sites like BRO.

OK, down off my soapbox.

Kirk McElhearn wrote (March 12, 2002):
[To Michael Grover] It shows here at 53 euros - that's about the price for the SMP (BWV 244) alone.

Donald Satz wrote (March 12, 2002):
[To Michael Grover] I can't agree with Michael that "full price doesn't cut in the Classical CD market anymore". It depends on just which recordings are being released at full price. I consider Suzuki well worth the premium price; you won't get this high level of quality from either Naxos or Brilliant Classics concerning Bach's sacred choral works.

Just like Michael, I had three children to raise, and they cost a bundle of money. Now, each of them is an adult and living on their own. It's something to look forward to, although it seems like an eternity before it happens. I changed the locks on the doors when the last of my kids moved out so that I wouldn't be restricted to only super budget releases.

Pierce Drew wrote (March 13, 2002):
[To Donald Satz] 53 Euros (ca. $47) is a really a pretty good price for both these recordings (Suzuki SMP (BWV 244) and SJP). If you live in the US like me, <amazon.fr> is a great option for getting European only releases. Their prices and shipping rates are generally low (considering it's coming from Europe), and unlike <amazon.de>, you get your order within a week or two after it is shipped.

Also, BTW, the Suzuki SMP (BWV 244) recording is available at <broinc.com> for around $24. And, if you have a DVD player, you can get the SJP DVD from <bn.com> (Barnes & Noble) for around $20, about $15 less than the price for the two-CD set. I just got the DVD a few days ago -- it is great to actually see Bach Collegium Japan performing, after listening to and enjoying their Cantata recordings for several years.

Oh, and one last thing: Speaking of Bach DVD's, have any of you seen the Gardiner Cantatas DVD (BWV 170, 199, 113 + footage from the Cantata Pilgrimage)? Thisvideo is truly a wonderful treat, especially if you're partial to Magdalena Kozena, whose rendition of "Mein Herze schwimmt in Blut" brought tears to my eyes the first time I viewed it (and I am definitely not the weepy type).

Arne Löfgren wrote (March 13, 2002):
[To Michael Grover] The price abroad are not to blame BIS. Here in Sweden you can buy BIS for around 130SEK=12 dollars. In other words much cheaper than full price CD:s wich are 170-195SEK. Actually BIS takes a lower price from music stores than DG and other great do.

 

2 recordings SJP by Suzuki

Marten Breuer wrote (March 23, 2002):
Those of you who like me love the Bach recordings conducted by Masaaki Suzuki might be interested to know that he has recorded two St. John Passions: the well-known BIS recording of the 1749 version and a recording of the 'ordinary' version on a Japanese label: see: Amazon.co.jp

You might also look at: http://www2s.biglobe.ne.jp/~bcj/cd-info(vocal).html

(sixth and last one) to see that the two recordings are not identical.

The Japanese one is a live recording from 1995 which is not available on the European market. Gerd Turck is performing as Evangelist, Midori Suzuki is singing the Soprano and Yoshikazu Mera the Alto part. The other artists do not perform on Suzuki's later recordings. Even though it is a mere live recording, I may wormly recommend it to you. It has the typical "warm" Suzuki sound which some of us appreciate so much.

Kirk McElhearn wrote (March 28, 2002):
[To Marten Breuer] This recording was discussed recently, as it is also available on a DVD.

 

3 (!) recordings of SJP by Suzuki

Marten Breuer wrote (May 10, 2002):
[To Kirk McElhearn] I have to correct myself: There are not only 2 but 3 recordings of the SJP conducted by Suzuki. (I had to learn for an oral exam, so I couldn't respond earlier.) What I've found out is that the DVD recording is *not* identical with the Japanese recording which I possess. The DVD version features Midori Suzuki, Blaze, Türk, MacLeod and Urano as Soloists whilst the Japanese recording features Midori Suzuki, Mera (!), Türk, Tatara and Mizuno (it's a very old recording from 1996).

Just to let you know...

Kirk McElhearn wrote (May 10, 2002):
[To Marten Breuer] Interesting. The 1996 recording is on a Japanese label?

Marten Breuer wrote (May 10, 2002):
[To Kirk McElhearn] This is what the BJC homepage says:

"Johannespassion -a live recording in 1995 (Japanese domestic release): KICC168/9"

"KICC" seems to be Kingrecords (see http://www.kingrecords.co.jp/index.html).

 

Suzuki SJP DVD

Continue of discussion from: Choir Form - Part 3 [General Topics]

Eric Bergerud wrote (February 5, 2005):
Michael Telles wrote:
< Since there's been so much talk about Bach's big choral pieces, I wanted to mention that I recently found an 11 CD set of Rilling doing the major choral work for only around $20. Check out the Berkshire Record Outlet online; it's a new special.
Here I go again with Suzuki, but have you heard his recording of St. John? Really nice. Take it easy, Michael. <
Suzuki also has a nice DVD of the SJP. Actually DVD's are pretty neat if your player is hooked up to a good sound system as mine is. You can play it like a CD and not watch at all, but it's all on one disc. And watching is fun. And DVD's tend to be less expensive than multiple CD works. Not much to lose.

Monte Garrett wrote (February 5, 2005):
[To Eric Bergerud] What timing! I used my copy of this DVD in a class just this morning to show my students the viola da gamba and oboe da caccia. Interesting to note that Suzuki uses the soloists in the choir, too.

Michael Telles wrote (February 5, 2005):
[To Eric Bergerud & Monte Garrett] Thanks: I should get my hands on the DVD. Sounds like there's a lot to learn by watching it; I never get the opportunity to see ensembles w/ choir play. I don't know how Suzuki records his choirs, but they sound beautifully transparent, very little distortion, etc. I often compare Suzuki's St. John to the sound quality in Gardiner's Bach choral recordings: Gardiner does a great job managing what sounds like a large choir, and the quality of the sound is great -- there is a certain distance, though, probably because of the choir's size. The first notes sung in Suzuki's St. John, dramatic as they are, grab you right by the throat.

I can't wait to get that set of Rilling discs (doing the major choral pieces) in the mail so I can hear a different approach. Any reaction from those with Rilling recordings?

Eric Bergerud wrote (February 5, 2005):
[To Michael Telles] There is a recent Harnoncout Advent festival DVD - does the Magnificat (BWV 243) and Cantata BWV 61: no subtitles for some reason. Also one by Gardiner and the usual suspects doing BWV 113, BWV 179 and BWV 199 strutting their stuff in a wonderful manner. Cleobury and Kings's, along with Roy Goodman, have done a DVD on both Passions for Brilliant and a Messiah.

For the life of me I don't understand why one of the groups doesn't do a DVD cycle of live cantata performances. The technology involved would be rather simpler than filming Harry Potter movies. It should be possible to get at least three CD's worth of music on one DVD and then sell the product for $25. Maybe the record companies haven't noticed, but the "home theater" sets for movie junkies are going out the door in huge numbers. Most actually give pretty lame sound, but good ones are quite adequate for serious listening. As I noted before, if one wants to read, just turn off the TV and the beautiful music is still there in a most convenient and economical format.

Archiv had a sale a year back and offered very low prices on some Rilling sets so I bought a couple. I fear that for Cantatas my ears have been wrecked by original instrument groups. Rilling's soloists are fine and the CDs nicely recorded, but I couldn't shake the feeling that I was hearing the Boston Pops. I have had very little experience with pre-HIP cantatas, so no doubt better educated listeners will find much to praise.

Mike Mannix wrote (February 5, 2005):
DG's abandoning of Gardiner's Cantata Pilgrimage would appear to indicate commercial death for any DVD series. Visual problems with such a project are legion. Non-operatic music rarely transfers well to film and a complete cantata series would appear unrealistic.

I was lucky to be able to attend J E-G's Cantata Pilgrimage on Iona on July 28 anniversary! Thankfully DG has released the existing recordings, and the recording project should be completed.

Rilling is unacceptably archaic. Leusink's budget series represents great value for money in UK.

Olle Hedström wrote (February 6, 2005):
[To Mike Mannix] You said, I quote: "Non-operatic music rarely transfers well to film"
Have you seen any of the available DVDs on the world market with Bach Church Cantatas or other vocal works ?

I suggest that you for example aquire the Cantata BWV 71, "Gott ist mein König" on DVD (JSB- Leben und Werk) shot on location in St Marienkirche in Mühlhausen, the very church where its first performance took place in 1708.

I find it awesome, and I'm convinced that you after hearing and s e e i n g that DVD would change your mind radically regarding Bach Cantatas on video.

There are other Bach Cantatas on DVDs too of the highest emotional, musical and technical quality.

Certainly I would like to see much more of such issues on the market.

Doug Cowling wrote (February 6, 2005):
Eric Bergerud wrote:
< For the life of me I don't understand why one of the groups doesn't do a DVD cycle of live cantata performances >
I would love to see a live perfromance of McCreesh's Epiphany Mass with a reenacted liturgy.

Eric Bergerud wrote (Febru6, 2005):
[To Doug Cowling] Ditto that. I'd even want a classic Lutheran sermon put in instead of the 5 minute symbolic word of wisdom on the CD. Any of the McCreesh stuff would be worth a try when you get down to it. I saw a DVD of Mozart's Figaro by the Drottningholm forces conducted by Arnold Ostman. The musicians were in costume and the staging very close to the 17th Century style - it was great fun. Respectfully disagree about non-operatic performance being unsuited to DVD. There's no difference in price - in theory DVD should be less expensive. You can add sub-titles which I find preferable to following a printed libretto. And watching musicians is fun - I wish there was more chorale Bach around here so I could go watch it. (It sure can be expressive. My patience with antique sound is less than what it was, but I remember watching a Furtwangler tape a couple of years ago from the early 50's - those musicians were throwing themselves into piece quite visually with the conductor almost in a trance. Very exciting. Not today's style I guess.)

Mike Mannix wrote (February 6, 2005):
I'd always be tempted to add narrative elements Hollywood-style - Gottfried Reich trumpeting himself to death. A frozen audience wheezing way through Xmas Oratorio (BWV 248).

JSB as a wayward youth in Arnstadt etc.
C.Ph.E W.F. provoking each other etc.
Straub's 'Chronicle of AMB' took a more detached view.

Peter Bloemendaal wrote (February 6, 2005):
The problem with cantatas or oratorio on DVD is not that it's boring to look at, but the division of the planet in regions and the division in PAL and NTSC (when I'm not mistaken). In a couple of weeks a DVD of SMP (BWV 244) by Holland Boys Choir will be released on PAL region free, Dolby 5.1 and DTS. I saw a demo. It sounds and looks great, yet I'm biassed. It can be preordered with 2 CD's to be played on your car set or you superior traditional stereo. It can be preordered through: www.hollandboyschoir.com or you can e-mail: info@hollandboyschoir.com.
They also have complete cantatas sets available.

Eric Bergerud wrote (February 6, 2005):
[To Peter Bloemendaal] If you were involved in the Leusink Cantata cycle, count me as a fan. I have four volumes and they have given me much enjoyment. Especial kudos to the choir and Ruth Holton.

The PAL issue isn't necessarily a killer. Almost every laptop computer in the US comes with a DVD player now and add-ons are dirt cheap for any decent PC. My software plays PAL flawlessly. My computer speakers are poor, but good earphones solve that problem. Getting the product is tougher in my view, although it looks like your new release is very reasonably priced.

Aryeh Oron wrote (February 6, 2005):
[To Olle Hedström] DVD with Cantata BWV 71?
Who are the performers?
Where can I buy it?

 

Suzuki 1st St John Passion

Jeremy Vosburgh wrote (October 24, 2005):
I recently managed to get my hands on Suzuki's first recording of the St. John Passion. Its an old April 1995 analog recording from Casals Hall in Japan. It was a live recording (as others have already mentioned once). I have his other two recordings of the SJP and have seen this recording listed on the BCW for the last year or so. I found it on the Japanese website and bought it. My chief interest in obtaining it was the singers present. They are all the first string of the singers that Suzuki employed in his first three CDs of cantatas. I have been very impressed witih this recording and find that it surpasses both the others Suzuki made (even the highly rated CD from 1998).

I find Tatara as Jesus gives a more convincing performance and more robust a voice than either Urano or McCleod. Gerd Turk sounds more youthful in this performance, which is an asset to his rather weak but pleasant voice, but he generally does no distinguish himself more or less in any of the three performances. Kuriso gives a better performance of "Ich folge" than either Ingrid S.'s "polished" performance or Suzuki's breakneck tempo attempt on DVD. Mera (dare I say it) is more expressive and sad/frantic sounding in the first alto aria than in his second attempt in 1998, and far outshines Blaze who again suffers from Suzuki's breakneck speed on DVD and has not chance to express himself while catching his breath. Koki Katano is quite an enigma as tenor soloist. His voice is so weak and yet he manages to be more expressive than the unassuming Sakurada and the polished Turk. btw Katano's bit tenor parts are the best I've ever heard. Mizuno as the bass soloist is very expressive and has a good voice. It like him as Pilate and Peter, but I prefer McCleod and Kooy in the arias. Midori Suzuki gives a stellar performance of the last soprano aria that blows away her later DVD recording. I have to be honest and say that I don't remember Ingrid S.'s rendition, which makes me think it must have been forgettable.

The highlight of the entire piece for me was the turba choruses and Akira Tachikawa on the alto aria "Es ist vollbracht." The turba choruses are far more expressive and the choir blend is better here than in the other Suzuki recordings of SJP. This may be due to the fact that there are 8 sopranos, 6 altos, 5 tenors, and 6 basses. In the 1998 recording Suzuki used an average of 5 singers in each part and for the DVD he used only 4 per part.

Akira Tachikawa's performance of "Es ist vollbracht" is the best I've ever heard. It wasn't technically perfect, but the sound was perfectly appropriate. The lute is used here (and it wasn't in the other recordings) and gives the sense of a larger empty space, which is appropriate I think. Tachikawa's full tone is perfectly suited to this mournful and exultant piece. Mera, I feel, is miscasted in the 1998 recording as he has too small a voice to give adequate interpretation to this piece. Blaze, again, does not even get the chance to do well because of Suzuki's "need for speed" in the DVD recording.

There is also one "easter egg" in this old recording..... Marcel Ponseele! Yes, he is the oboe soloist in this recording and not in either of the other two.

Overall, this was quite a good recording which did not disappoint. I find the turba choruses, Akira Tachikawa and Mera to be the real gems in this recording that really has not weak points except for Turk and Katano's voices, which could stand to be a lot stronger. You don't have to blow away the house of sticks like Robert Tear, but it would be nice to at least be able to be heard above a viola da gamba!

All in all, this recording was very good (the attractive of Suzuki's three imho). While it doesn't quite reach the levels of Scherchen's '62 recording with ol' Van Kesteren running the show (what a difference an evangelist can make), it is a recording that I will come back to quite often.

Chris Kern wrote (October 24, 2005):
Huh, I had entirely the opposite reaction upon buying it. I was extremely disappointed in it and even after listening to it numerous times, I still prefer the DVD in almost every respect. It sounds like the singers are being drowned out by the orchestra on most of the pieces, or like they're standing 10 feet away from the microphone. I prefer the harpischord continuo on the DVD. I vastly prefer Blaze's performance of the first alto aria to Mera's on the CD version. I prefer McCleod's Jesus to whoever sings it on the CD. And so on. I guess that's why they make different versions and keep them in print. :-)

Jeremy Vosburgh wrote (October 24, 2005):
In response to Chris.

Do you have all three recordings? You didn't mention the 2nd: I wonder your opinion on that one as well. I agree with you that the placement of the singers was not ideal in Suzuki's 1st recording which was a live recording in 1995. The BIS recording in 1998 cleaned most of that up. And in the DVD from 2000 it wasn't a problem either. Yes the placements were very bad in the 1st recording, and you could hardly hear Mera and Katano in many pla. That said, I thought both of them were very expressive. All in all the recording and sound was rougher than both of Suzuki's other recordings. I like good sound and technique when I can get it, but imho interpretation is by far the most important aspect of sacred church music. I agree that Blaze has a better voice than Mera and did have a lot of energy, but I feel that Mera's interpretation was more personal and sad than Blaze's in "Von den stricken". I really do like Blaze, but I thought that the extremely fast tempo Suzuki inflicted him with, allowed him no thinking room outside of "notes and word". I will admit that this is a matter of personal preference; and I still do like Blazes' performance and come back to it occasionally. You didn't mention Tachikawa... To me, his rendition of "Es ich vollbracht" with the lute and viola da gamba in the background was the highlight of the CD.

The issue of McCleod as Jesus is also a matter of personal taste. He sang technically perfect and had a very attractive sounding voice but I liked Tatara better. Urano was good, but he didn't affect me greatly (although he did a great job in Schutz's Last Seven Words with Suzuki). I have always held the personal belief that John's gospel was more of a manual for young Christians and non-Christians on how to be a Christian; and thus a teaching gospel. Matthew's gospel I have understood to be more of a historical account of Jesus' life and ministry; in other words more of a story. Consequently I look at the portrayal of Matthew's Jesus as more of the human side, and John's as more of the Divine side. iow I liked Tatara's full voice representation of Jesus more than McCleod's more human interpretation. McCleod is a singer I respect very much, and his performance in Hengelbrock's Mass in B (BWV 232) was exemplary as was his performance in BWV 104 with Suzuki. I also enjoyed his singing of the arias in the DVD and he is my preferred singer of those arias of the three Suzuki recordings (although Mizuno was quite good, as was Kooy).

 

Masaaki Suzuki-for advanced listeners

Terejia wrote (March 28, 2008):
John Pike wrote:
< Maybe your legal colleagues could be persuaded to attend a Masaaki Suzuki concert. I watched a DVD the other day of him conducting the SJP in the Sun Tory hall in Tokyo...very moving. if that doesn't persuade
them, nothing will! >
Thank you for replying. I find the beauty of serenity in his rendition of St. Johannes Passion. absolutely beautiful.

However, I doubt if it can reach to untrained audience who have had no experience of Bach other than mandatory education of listening to G-moll Fugue organ piece in junior highschool-more precisely saying, I
doubt if Mr. Suzuki would ever welcome that kind of audience.

Additioanlly, the piece BWV 245 is way too much above beginner listener's head and Bach must have intended it for advanced listeners, IMHO. The first chorus has something onimous, which is strangely beautiful, paradoxically. The text of it contains paradox, too.

Yoël L. Arbeitman wrote (April 1, 2008):
[To Terejia] I really cannot agree with you, i.e. about the work, not about the performance. Persons have different degrees of understanding of music. nevertheless a person can totally respond to music without advanced musical training.

I really never agree that let's say in opera that a person must first listen to or be exposed to La boheme or Mma butterfly and not to what might be considered a deeper opera. I really don't think that it serves any purpose to spoon feed classical or baroque music. Let anyone hear Bach's or Berlioz's or whoever's most complex music and some few persons will be deeply affected by it. Now if for example Uri writes a dissertation on the Messe in h-Moll (BWV 232) or Brad knows the harpsichord and has special theories, of course they have a different appreciation but we cannot limit the great music to only professional experts. I refrain from discussing my preferences in this work bc. that serves little purpose.

Terejia wrote (April 5, 2008):
[To Yoël L. Arbeitman] Thank you for your insight. It broadens my perspective.

replies in between :

Yoël L. Arbeitman wrote:
< I really cannot agree with you, i.e. about the work, not about the performance. Persons have different degrees of understanding of music. nevertheless a person can totally respond to music without advanced musical training. >
Now that you said it, I noticed some another aspects of music.

< I really never agree that let's say in opera that a person must first listen to or be exposed to La boheme or Mma butterfly and not to what might be considered a deeper opera. I really don't think that it serves any purpose to spoon feed classical or baroque music. Let anyone hear Bach's or Berlioz's or whoever's most complex
music and some few persons will be deeply affected by it. >
It may well be true. It was when I was 8th grade pupil when I first came in contact with Mass in B-minor (BWV 232), Helmuth Rilling and I was struck in awe. But then, I was exposed to classical music my father is listening to since I was born.

In my extremely narrow experience in Japan, there seems to be a tendency that Bach Cantata-or may be classical music in general; arts, literature etc are less reaching to the hearts of those who are competent in bussiness. A web-friend of mine, who is a graduate from Tokyo University (the top university in Japan) and now a lawyer, has zero interests in classical music.

Among my legal friends, Bill Gaitz seems to be more admired/appreciated than Masaaki Suzuki/Karl Richter or whoever the first class Bach performers, or Seiji Ozawa or Karl Böhm, you name it. The books they are reading with much eagerness are bussiness-know-how books, rather than Bach's biography or documentary DVD of "Karl Richter in München" (I haven't seen it myself yet, though I wish to).

Yes, as you say, St. Matthews Passion (BWV 244) or Mass in B-minor (BWV 232) could reach beginner listeners' heart if they are perceptive. On the other hand, at least in Japan and my narrow and limited environment, I don't see these masterpieces reach to the hearts of competent bussiness persons' heart. When I go to Karaoke with these people, of course I wouldn't/cannot/shouldn't sing Passion chorale or Gregorian chant.

I love and respect my legal friends nevertheless. Yes, I learn and am helped by them in many respects and for me it simply doesn't make sense at all to discuss if Bill Gaitz is superior/inferior to first class Bach performers. Simply different talents.

< Now if for example Uri writes a dissertation on the Messe in h-Moll (BWV 232) or Brad knows the harpsichord and has special theories, of course they have a different appreciation but we cannot limit the great music to only professional experts. I refrain from discussing my preferences in this work bc. that serves little purpose. >
Music has so more aspects than I could think of. It's good that I can see it in a different perspective.

Yoël L. Arbeitman wrote (April 7, 2008):
Terejia wrote:
< It may well be true. It was when I was 8th grade pupil when I first dear Terejia came in contact with Mass in B-minor, Hermut Rilling and I was struck in awe. But then, I was exposed to classical music my father is listening to since I was born. >
So, then, you have a certain advantage in that your father exposed you to Classical Music. I am not born in Japan but in the USA and in a family where there was no interest in music at all, of any kind, except maybe the current pop songs on the radio sort of as background. Then at age 10 I heard both symphonic and operatic music and was smitten and, as you say, awe-struck. I did not really encounter Bach, at least the vocal music, until I was about 20 and soon felt it was the supreme music.

< In my extremely narrow experience in Japan, there seems to be a tendency that Bach Cantata-or may be classical music in gener; arts, literature etc are less reaching to the hearts of those who are competent in bussiness. A web-friend of mine, who is a graduate from Tokyo University(the top university in Japan) and now a lawyer, has zero interests in classical music. >
But again, I am sure that in the USA most college graduates and most MBAs and most MDs have zero interest in classical music. It really is not part of American culture. It is European culture, as is customary to say nowadays, the music of dead white men and ditto the literature and the art about which you speak.

< Among my legal friends, Bill Gaitz seems to be more admired/appreciated than Masaaki Suzuki/Karl Richter or whoever the first class Bach performers, or Seiji Ozawa or Karl Böhm, you name it. >
I don't know who Bill Gaitz is unless you mean Bill Gates of Microsoft. Of course a very small portion of humans in the world today are concerned with any of the musicians you mention. This is not a phenomenon of Japan. One of the odd things in recent years in the USA is the dominance amongst performing musicians of persons who either are themselves or their parents are from "The Orient", Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. At one time most of the great performing musicians were East European Jewish and today they are often "Oriental".

When I went to a Mahler huge symphony, the 3rd, given by The Princeton University Symphony Orch. a few years ago, about 2/3 of the players were Oriental. We are speaking in the main of Oriental-Americans. This was very interesting and they were all non-music-majors and excellent musicians. They both study their fields and practice all day:-)

< The books they are reading with much eagerness are bussiness-know-how books, rather than Bach's biography or documentary DVD of "Karl Richter in München" (I haven't seen it myself yet, though I wish to). >
I don't understand why you are surprised. My "rich" friends, the ones who are money-investors, and such are all only interested in "oldies but goodies", pleasant songs from the 1950s and 1960s, I guess.

< Yes, as you say, St. Matthews Passion (BWV 244) or Mass in B-minor (BWV 232) could reach beginner listeners' heart if they are perceptive. On the other hand, at least in Japan and my narrow and limited environment, I don't see these masterpieces reach to the hearts of competent bussiness persons' heart. When I go to Karaoke with these people, of course I wouldn't/cannot/shouldn't sing Passion chorale or Gregorian chant. >
Good idea.

< I love and respect my legal friends nevertheless. Yes, I learn and am helped by them in many respects and for me it simply doesn't make sense at all to discuss if Bill Gaitz is superior/inferior to first class Bach performers. Simply different talents. >
Very few persons I know in non-virtual life have any interest in this stuff. I think you are assuming that this is special to Japan. It is not. I shall sign my name without the diaeresis in order that you may read it. Yoel (Yoël) It is the Hebrew name of one of the Twelve Minor Prophets, the dodeka. In English it became Joel but in French with the diaeresis which I shall avoid. It is pronounced bisyllabicly.

 

Enormous bassoon in Bach Collegium Japan St John Passion

David McKay wrote (June 3, 2011):
My wife and I have been enjoying the Bach Collegium Japan performance of St John Passion. We only received it last week, but have already watched it three times.

I highly recommend it to you. It was cheap as chips and is first class.

But what is the enormous instrument at the back? It is easily twice the size of a bassoon, looks like a huge bassoon, but not like a contrabassoon.

Can't find it online nor in a book.

Henner Schwerk wrote (June 3, 2011):
[To David McKay] have a look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrabassoon
Bach used this instrument for his last version of the St. Johns Passion, when he had a pretty big orchestra. Thats why he needed a strong bass instrument.

The interesting thing is, that he used it not only for the "turbae chorus", for the big choir numbers of this work ("col bassono grosso") but also for an arioso of the bass singer soloist "Betrachte, meine Seele". This is a very tender piece, it has a gentle sound created by the Liuto and the 2 viola d'amore.

Maybe he used it because this gentle piece of music comes directly after the castigating of Pilatus.

I performed the St Johns Passion several times, but never used the Bassono grosso.

What does the group say?

Eric Basta wrote (June 5, 2011):
[To David McKay] In a related comment to this particular performance, Suzuki seems to be using the "alternate" music of the opening chorus.

 

Johannes-Passion BWV 245: Details
Recordings:
1900-1949 | 1950-1959 | 1960-1969 | 1970-1979 | 1980-1989 | 1990-1999 | 2000-2009 | 2010-2019 | Sung in English | Individual Movements
General Discussions:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6
Systematic Discussions:
Part 1: Mvts. 1-7 | Part 2: Mvts. 6-14 | Part 3: Mvts. 15-20 | Part 4: Mvts. 21-26 | Part 5: Mvts. 27-32 | Part 6: Mvts. 36-40 | Part 7: Summary
Individual Recordings:
BWV 245 - F. Brüggen | BWV 245 - S. Cleobury | BWV 245 - P. Dombrecht | BWV 245 - D, Fasolis | BWV 245 - J.E. Gardiner | BWV 245 - E.z. Guttenberg | BWV 245 - N. Harnoncourt-H. Gillesberger | BWV 245 - P. Herreweghe | BWV 245 - E. Higginbottom | BWV 245 - E. Jochum | BWV 245 - E. Kleiber | BWV 245 - P.J. Leusink | BWV 245 - H. Max | BWV 245 - P. McCreesh | BWV 245 - H. Münch | BWV 245 - P. Neumann | BWV 245 - A. Parrott | BWV 245 - P. Pickett | BWV 245 - K. Richter | BWV 245 - H. Rilling | BWV 245 - P. Schreier | BWV 245 - R. Shaw | BWV 245 - K. Slowik | BWV 245 - M. Suzuki | BWV 245 - J.v. Veldhoven
Articles:
Saint John Passion, BWV 245 [T.N. Towe] | The Passion of Saint John, BWV 245 [M. Steinberg] | St. John Passion [A. Wong & N. Proctor] | The St. John Passion on stage [U. Golomb] | Literary Origins of Bach’s St. John Passion: 1704-1717 [W. Hoffman] | Bach’s Passion Pursuit [W. Hoffman]

Masaaki Suzuki: Short Biography | Bach Collegium Japan
Recordings of Vocal Works:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Recordings of Instrumental Works
General Discussions:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5
Cantatas:
Suzuki - Vol. 2 | Suzuki - Vol. 5 | Suzuki - Vol. 8 | Suzuki - Vol. 9 | Suzuki - Vol. 10 | Suzuki - Vol. 11 | Suzuki - Vol. 12 | Suzuki - Vol. 13 | Suzuki - Vol. 14 | Suzuki - Vol. 15 | Suzuki - Vol. 16 | Suzuki - Vol. 17 | Suzuki - Vol. 18 | Suzuki - Vol. 19 | Suzuki - Vol. 20 | Suzuki - Vol. 21 | Suzuki - Vol. 22 | Suzuki - Vol. 23 | Suzuki - Vol. 24 | Suzuki - Vol. 25 | Suzuki - Vol. 26 | Suzuki - Vol.. 27 | Suzuki - Vol. 28 | Suzuki - Vol. 29 | Suzuki - Vol. 30 | Suzuki - Vol. 31 | Suzuki - Vol. 38 | Suzuki - Vol. 43 | Suzuki Secular - Vol. 1
Other Vocal Works:
BWV 232 - M. Suzuki | BWV 243 - M. Suzuki | BWV 244 - M. Suzuki | BWV 245 - M. Suzuki | BWV 248 - M. Suzuki
Reviews of Instrumental Recordings:
Bach’s Clavier-Ubung III from Masaaki Suzuki | Bach Harpsichord Discs from Hill and Suzuki | Bach’s French Suites from Suzuki | Review: Partitas by Suzuki [McElhearn] | Suzuki’s Partitas [Henderson] | Suzuki’s Goldberg Variations
Discussions of Instrumental Recordings:
Partitas BWV 825-830 - played by M. Suzuki
Table of recordings by BWV Number

Recordings & Discussions of Other Vocal Works: Main Page | Motets BWV 225-231 | Mass in B minor BWV 232 | Missae Breves & Sanctus BWV 233-242 | Magnificat BWV 243 | Matthäus-Passion BWV 244 | Johannes-Passion BWV 245 | Lukas-Passion BWV 246 | Markus-Passion BWV 247 | Weihnachts-Oratorium BWV 248 | Oster-Oratorium BWV 249 | Chorales BWV 250-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-523 | Quodlibet BWV 524 | Aria BWV 1127

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Last update: ýJune 28, 2011 ý08:55:41