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Masaaki Suzuki & Bach Collegium Japan
Cantatas Vol. 16
Cantatas BWV 194, BWV 119

C-16

J.S. Bach: Cantatas Vol. 16 - Cantatas from Leipzig 1723 - BWV 119, 194

 
 

Cantatas BWV 119 [23:21], BWV 194 [38:37]

Masaaki Suzuki

Bach Collegium Japan

Sopranos: Yukari Nonoshita, Yoshie Hida; Alto: Kirsten Sollek-Avella; Tenor: Makoto Sakurada; Baritone: Jochen Kupfer; Bass: Peter Kooy

BIS 1131

Oct 5-8, 1999 [BWV 119]
Nov 9-10, 2000 [BWV 194]

CD / TT: 62:50

Recorded at the Kobe Shoin Women's University Chapel, Japan.
See: Cantatas Vol. 16 - conducted by Masaaki Suzuki
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Suzuki Vol. 16

Peter Bright wrote (December 11, 2001):
I have noticed that vol 16 of the exceptional Suzuki cantatas series has been released (at least somewhere in the world). Has anyone heard this yet? It proudly boasts cantatas BWV 194 & BWV 119 - BWV 194 is a particularly immense work (his longest cantata?). Details below.

Johann Sebastian Bach: Cantata No.194, "Höchsterwünschtes Freudenfest", BWV 194; Cantata No.119, "Preise, Jerusalem, den Herrn", BWV 119; BIS-CD-1131.

Bach Collegium Japan directed by Masaaki Suzuki; Yukari Nonoshita, soprano (BWV 194); Yoshie Hida, soprano (BWV 119); Kirsten Sollek-Avella, alto (BWV 119); Makoto Sakurada, tenor; Jochen Kupfer, baritone (BWV 194); Peter Kooij, bass (BWV 119).

Thomas Boyce wrote (December 11, 2001):
[To Peter Bright] I think the US is the last place the Suzuki CDs are available. I look forward to it.

 

Bachiana & Suzuki 16

Peter Bright wrote (January 23, 2002):
A very quick post (more to come) to say how much I am enjoying the following 2 new releases:
Bachiana - music by the Bach family (inc. Heinrich Bach, 1615-1692; Johann Ludwig Bach, 1677-1731; Johann Christoph Bach, 1642-1703; Cyriacus Wilche, ?-1667; and JS himself); directed by Goebel with Musica Antiqua Koln.
The Suzuki disc contains two incidental cantatas - forgive me for not naming them (I've temporarily forgotten, I'm at work and don't really have time for this message, however brief!) but I'm pleased to say that they maintain the exceptionally high standards set on the earlier releases. Slightly brittle soprano voicings in one of the recitatives, but pure joy otherwise...

Anyone else sampled these discs?

Riccardo Nughes wrote (January 23, 2002):
[To Peter Bright] Sometimes ago I wrote something about Bachiana. See it at : http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BachRecordings/message/3540
There will be 2 further volumes in this serie , the third will feature Cantatas & Motets from bach family members for solo voice (M. Kozena). The second will feature again instrumental music.

Kirk McElhearn wrote (January 23, 2002):
[To Peter Bright] Yes, I have them both. I have not yet listened to the Suzuki, but the Bachiana disc is indeed interesting. I'll post reviews soon.

Kirk McElhearn wrote (January 23, 2002):
[To Riccardo Nughes] Magdalena seems to be specializing in the old Kantor's music... That's a good thing!

Marten Breuer wrote (January 23, 2002):
[To Peter Bright] I do have Suzuki vol 16 and enjoy it very much. I am particularly fond of baritone Jochen Kupfer in BWV 194 who appears for the first time on Suzuki's cantata recordings. I find his voice is very similar to Klaus Mertens' whom I like very much, too.

As regards BWV 119, however, I think that the opening chorus is even more brilliant on Herreweghe's recording, but that might be a question of personal taste and impression.

As a whole, nonetheless: highly recommendable!

 

Review Bach Cantatas Volume 16 by Suzuki

Kirk McElhearn wrote (March 4, 2002):
Cantata No.194, "Höschesterwünschtes Feudenfest", BWV 194
Cantata No.119, "Preise, Jerusalem, den Herrn", BWV 119

Yukari Nonoshita, soprano (BWV 194)
Yoshie Hida, soprano (BWV 119)
Kirsten Sollek-Avella, alto (BWV 119)
Makoto Sakurada, tenor
Jochen Jupfer, baritone (BWV 194)
Peter Kooij, bass

Bach Collegium Japan, Masaaki Suzuki

Rec: September 2000, Kobe Shoin Women¹s University, Japan.
BIS CD-1111 [62:50]

Masaaki Suzuki continues his complete set of Bach’s sacred cantatas with this volume 16, featuring two cantatas from Bach¹s early years in Leipzig, both written in late. Suzuki’s restrained forces and excellent soloists once again put Bach into a very welcome perspective, as compared to other recordings of the cantatas.

Suzuki’s small chorus (twelve singers in BWV 194 and sixteen in BWV 119) gives this music a delicate sound, with a fine texture and clear voicings. His light orchestral touch lets the singers take centre stage, and keep the music reserved, when necessary, but can express a great deal of joy as well.

Cantata BWV 194 is an occasional work, written for the “inauguration of the organ in Störmthal”, as Bach noted on his score. Actually, this inauguration was of the entire church - which explains why there is no solo organ par in the cantata. The text of the cantata clearly talks of the church, and is a poetic dedication of this church to God. It is scored for three oboes, strings and continuo, with soprano, tenor and bass soloists. This is a festive work, and a very long one - at more than 38 minutes on this recording, this is among Bach’s longest cantatas.

Baritone Jochen Kupfer sings the bass part in this cantata, and is quite good. This is his first appearance in this series. He first aria, Was des Höchsten Glans erfüllt is one of those Bach arias that flows like a river, the oboes carrying along the singer as they accompany him. Soprano Yukari Nonoshita is a bit uneven in her first aria Hulf, Gott, dass es uns gelingt. She wavers between a correct volume and being slightly overwhelmed by the orchestra. She has one of those light soprano voices, somewhat airy, but at times moves into a richer register. She has the most important role in this work - her two arias, at over six and nine minutes respectively (the latter a duet with bass) - are the longest parts of this cantata.

Cantata BWV 119 is another occasional work, written for the Leipzig council election of 1723. This cantata features trombones, timpani, flutes and oboes, and opens with a French-style overture which expresses its festive, almost regal nature. This overture, which may have been borrowed from a lost work, becoa choral movement, after its introductory section, showing Bach’s ability to adapt his music to many situations. The overall tone of this work is grandiose, and the soloists rise to the occasion. But the “meat” of this cantata are the two long choral sections, the first, the opening movement, just over five minutes, and the second over six minutes. The choir is rich and dense, even though there are only 16 singers, and the balance between the choir and orchestra is exemplary.

Masaaki Suzuki continues with his excellent recordings of Bach’s cantatas, giving yet another excellent volume with a fine balance between musicians and singers. The two cantatas on this disc are among the finest in Bach’s oeuvre, and this volume is an excellent recording of them.

(One final comment - Bis includes excellent, thorough notes with all the recordings in this series, and most of their releases. However, the type size for these notes is quite small, making them difficult to read for many people. The text is much smaller for the Bach Cantata recordings than other Bis discs, such as the CPE Bach series.)

Piotr Jaworski wrote (March 4, 2002):
[To Kirk McElhearn] ..... the subject definitely taken away! ;-)
This happens to very, very busy people - I had not time during the weekend to complete my own review, and to fulfil promise so solemnly given to Peter.

But I'm happy that you like this recording - it's merits are numerous - beginning from the qualities of works. Performance is indisputably first class, and I have to say that even Yukari Nanoshita performs here better than on the vol. 17. Peter, this volume sets the bar on the very high level - but believe me, the very next one - 17th - meets the challenge with ease! On every account - music and performance. In case of hardly possible disappointment - my Harnoncourt cheque will be yours!

And few more comments on Suzuki below:

Kirk McElhearn wrote: [snip]
< Cantata 119 is another occasional work, written for the Leipzig > council election of 1723. This cantata features trombones, timpani, flutes and oboes, and opens with a French-style overture which expresses its festive, almost regal nature. [snip] >
This entering piece reminded me the recently seen move "VATEL" (with Depardieu and Thurman)... do you remember that fragment when Louis The Sun Kings enters the scene and all the prepared festivities begun...? Replace Rameau with Bach and there will be no difference at all. Bach's Pomp and Circumstance Music. Glorious and wonderful. In such cases I can't stop thinking about different turns of the Wheel of Fortune - what would happen if JSB be accepted as organist in Gdansk, or if he would take the post at the Court of Saxony and Poland? Would his music change and rather follow this "regal" way? Would the case of Händel apply? Would his works be more "market oriented"?? On the other hand, in the lovely alto aria "Die Obrigkeit ist Gottes Gabe" (with beautiful part of flutes) - if you do not understand German, you would never believe what the text is about (!):

"Authority is a gift from God / Indeed, the very image of God. Who will not recognize its power, / He must be unmindful of the power of God: / How would his word otherwise be fulfilled?"

< Masaaki Suzuki continues with his excellent recordings of Bach’s cantatas, giving yet another excellent volume with a fine balance between musicians and singers. The two cantatas on this disc are among the finest in Bachąs oeuvre, and this volume is an excellent recording of them. >
Well ... bearing in mind, that according to Simon Crouch rating system, there are more than 50% of all cantatas rated "1" or higher, no surprise at all!!!! ;-)

But seriously - I fully share Kirk's comments - and not only because I'm well Suzuki-infected already. Some of the recent volumes showed that the series shows first symptoms of gasp ... but it passed, and both those recent volumes - this – 16th, as well as the next one, show that the BCJ is in it's best disposition again. I simply can't imagine the forthcoming B minor Mass (BWV 232) recording ... :-))

Peter Bright wrote (March 4, 2002):
[To Piotr Jaworski] I enjoyed your "I'm well Suzuki-infected already" comment - I looked it up in my diagnostic medical dictionary but it wasn't there. I'm getting worried because I think I've caught it too (and it's invaded my heart and brain!). The symptoms are pure bliss though, so I think the anxiety will pass (as long as I can get my hands on that elusive volume 17...).

Thanks to you and Kirk for your comments/review...

 

Masaaki Suzuki: Short Biography | Bach Collegoim Japan
Recordings of Vocal Works:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Recordings of Instrumental Works
General Discussions:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4
Cantatas:
Suzuki - Vol. 2 | Suzuki - Vol. 5 | Suzuki - Vol. 8 | Suzuki - Vol. 9 | Suzuki - Vol. 10 | Suzuki - Vol. 11 | Suzuki - Vol. 12 | Suzuki - Vol. 13 | Suzuki - Vol. 14 | Suzuki - Vol. 15 | Suzuki - Vol. 16 | Suzuki - Vol. 17 | Suzuki - Vol. 18 | Suzuki - Vol. 19 | Suzuki - Vol. 20 | Suzuki - Vol. 21 | Suzuki - Vol. 22 | Suzuki - Vol. 23 | Suzuki - Vol. 24 | Suzuki - Vol. 25 | Suzuki - Vol. 26 | Suzuki - Vol.. 27 | Suzuki - Vol. 28 | Suzuki - Vol. 29 | Suzuki - Vol. 30 | Suzuki - Vol. 31 | Suzuki - Vol. 38 | Suzuki Secular - Vol. 1
Other Vocal Works:
BWV 232 - M. Suzuki | BWV 243 - M. Suzuki | BWV 244 - M. Suzuki | BWV 245 - M. Suzuki | BWV 248 - M. Suzuki
Reviews of Instrumental Recordings:
Bach’s Clavier-Ubung III from Masaaki Suzuki | Bach Harpsichord Discs from Hill and Suzuki | Bach’s French Suites from Suzuki | Review: Partitas by Suzuki [McElhearn] | Suzuki’s Partitas [Henderson] | Suzuki’s Goldberg Variations
Discussions of InstrumenRecordings:
Partitas BWV 825-830 - played by M. Suzuki
Table of recordings by BWV Number

Conductors of Vocal Works: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | Singers & Instrumentalists

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Last update: ýOctober 26, 2008 ý11:04:45