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Musical Context of Bach Cantatas
Motets & Chorales for 11th Sunday after Trinity

 

Readings: Epistle: 1 Corinthians 15: 1-10; Gospel: Luke 18: 9-14

Dates in the lifetime of J.S. Bach, including works composed for the event

Motets and Chorales for the 11th Sunday after Trinity (Trinity 11)

Douglas Cowling wrote (November 6, 2011):
THE MUSICAL CONTEXT OF BACH'S CANTATAS:
MOTETS AND CHORALES FOR THE ELEVENTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY

Sources:

* BACH'S HYMN BOOK:
Jürgen Grimm, "Das neu [?] Leipziger Gesangbuch des Gottfried Vopelius
(Leipzig 1682)",
Berlin: Merseburger, 1969.
ML 3168 G75

* BACH'S MOTET COLLECTION:
Otto Riemer, "Erhard Bodenschatz und sein Florilegium Portense"
Schünigen: Kaminsky,1927
ML 410 B67R4

Partial Index of Motets in ³Florilegium Portense² with links to online scores and biographies:
http://www3.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Florilegium_Portense

Dissertation on Bodenschatz Collection (downloadable):
http://etd.ohiolink.edu/view.cgi/Chaney%20Mark%20A.pdf?osu1180461416

NOTES:

* Like Trinity 9, no motets are listed for Trinity 11, unlike the preceding week, Trinity 10, which has four options. Given the generic, Oomnes tempore¹ texts of many of the Trinity season motets, Bach may well have chosen from the preceding Sunday¹s list.

* The chorales are less specifically prescribed for this Sunday, having all been options for earlier Sundays in the Trinity season.

1) MOTETS for Introit, Before Sermon at mass and vespers for Choir II, and During Communion:

No prescribed motets for Trinity 11

2) HYMN OF DAY (de tempore)

"Allein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ²
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale111-Eng3.htm
Digital sample: http://ingeb.org/hymn_a.html

3) CHORALES for Pulpit and Communion Hymns:

"Aus tiefer Not²
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale085-Eng3.htm

"Herr Gott ich ruf zu dir²

³Ebarm dich mein² [also Trinity 3]

³O Herr Gott begnade mich² [also Trinity 3]

³Es ist das Heil² [also Trinity 6]
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale020-Eng3.htm
Digital sample: http://ingeb.org/spiritua/esistdas.mid

³Vater unser im Himmelreich² [also Trinity 5, Trinity 7]
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale049-Eng3.htm
Digital sample: http://ingeb.org/spiritua/vateruns.mid

 

Chorales and Sacred Texts for 11th Sunday After Trinity

William Hoffman wrote (November 8, 2011):
Bach's church music for the 11th Sunday after Trinity is grounded in traditional Lutheran teaching and music, with the dominant theme of repentance as part of the Lutheran concept of the "New Life of Righteousness." It is the last of the six Sundays of this Trinity Time conceptual cycle that began on the 5th Sunday after Trinity, preceded by the initial cycle dealing with "The Kingdom of Grace and the "Call" to enter therein.

The texts and chorales relate to the Sunday Gospel, Luke 18: 9-14, the "Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican," found only in the third Gospel. They show the contrast between the Old Testament law observance of the proud, priestly Pharisee and the Gospel of the humble Publican, a Roman contractor and servant, with his plea of mercy as a sinner as his justification. The parable of the two contrasting men also represents the Middle Trinity Time Gospel pairing of Jesus' parables and miracles, in this case with the Gospel for the subsequent 12th Sunday after Trinity: Mark 7: 31-37, "Miracle of the Deaf Man," the first of Jesus' healing miracles at the beginning of his public ministry. Thus the theme of repentance is couple with healing.

The Leipzig cantor presented four different cantatas between 1723 and 1726, utilizing a variety of texts and associated penitential chorales: Cantatas BWV 199 (soprano solo), BWV 179 (chorus), and BWV 113 (chorale cantata), as well as a Rudolstadt one-part cantata of cousin Johann Ludwig in 1726.

The titles of the cantatas and their chorales reveal various facets of humility, penitence and ultimate justification:

*Cantata BWV 199, "My heart swims in blood," with the hymn stanza "I, your troubled child, cast all my sins" from the hymn "Where should I fly from here";

*Cantata BWV 179, "See that your fear of God is not hypocrisy," to the opening hymn stanza, "I poor man, I poor sinner," set to the melody, "Who only the loving God lets govern";

*Cantata BWV 113, "Lord Jesus Christ, you highest good," with the closing Stanza 8, "Strengthen me with your joyful spirit"; and

*JLB-15, "Through thy recognition will he, my servant" with two different chorales: "Zion mourns with anxiety and pain" and stanza 10, "Therefore on you alone, Lord Christ, I rely" from "Where should I fly from here," also found in Cantata BWV 199.

Re-enforcing the theme of repentance is the central Christian doctrine of the Resurrection of Christ, found in this Sunday's Epistle, 1 Corinthians 15: 1-10, the Apostle Paul's testimonial of Christ's resurrection. Together with other readings, they

Attention is called to Francis Browne's 10/6, [BachCantatas] "BWV 199 Notes on the text"; BCW, http://webmail.earthlink.net/wam/msg.jsp?msgid=5090&folder=INBOX&isSeen=true&x=135458166.
"The tax collectors plea, "Gott sei mir Sünder gnädig" [God, be gracious to me, a sinner] is placed in the centre of the text as the turning point where anguish for sin turns to repentance and hope," found in No. 3, Recitative with strings, "Doch Gott muß mir gnädig sein" (But God must be gracious to me). Here is the Lutheran pivot point in many of Bach's Trinity Time cantatas, when the text shifts from the Law that condemns to the Gospel that redeems from the law's condemnation, often with tonal allegory key shifting upwards (anabasis).

This focus on the Gospel's answer to the Law's question is "fundamental to Lutheran Theology" and is one of Bach's "Theo-Musico Hermeneutics," says theologian and scholar Robin Leaver ["Motive and Motif in the Church music of JSB," in <Bach> essays, edited by Ya Tomita, Ashgate, Burlington VT, 2011): 120ff]. "The theological distinction between law and gospel frequently provides the ground plan for a good many of Bach's cantatas." The other three hermeneutics or explanatory devices, says Leaver, involve the Doctrine of the Trinity, the theme of Discipleship, and the use of the chorale melody. "Again and again in Bach's vocal works, he underscores Christological meaning by adding a further musical dimension to the text being set. Frequently he will use achorale melody to achieve this end," Leaver observers.

The 11th Sunday after Trinity, closes the six-Sunday Trinity Time internal cycle of the "New Life of Righteousness." The previous five Sundays after Trinity had focused on the "New Life of Righteousness" in Jesus, replacing the Old Righteousness of the Law of the Scribes and Pharisees; the "holding out" for a "better righteousness"; adding to it the "gift of God"; warning of the false doctrines and prophets; and exhorting to that new life the necessity of faith, loyalty, fidelity, and stewardship [Paul Zeller Strodach, <The Church Year>, United Lutheran Publication House, Philadelphia PA, 1924: 211].

Here are the four Cantatas, BWV 199, BWV 179, BWV 113, and JLB-15 with summaries of their chorales:

1. BWV 199 "Mein Herze schwimmt im Blut" (My heart swims in blood); performances, 8/12/1714 (C Minor version), 1718-22 (?violin=soprano), and 8/8/1723 (D Minor version) is a soprano solo cantata with strings, and basso continuo. Cantata BWV 199 is set to a Georg Christian Lehms 1711 text (Movements Nos. 1-5, 7-8. Movement No. 6 is soprano chorale trio aria, chorale text of Johann Heermann (1630) the 11-stanza penitential and general communion hymn, "Wo soll ich fliehen hin" (Where should I fly from here). It is listed in the <Neu Leipziger Gesangbuch> (NLGB, 1682) as No. 182, a Buß Lied (Repent Song), and specifically as a communion hymn for the 3rd Sunday after Trinity. The soprano sings Stanza 3, "Ich, dein betrübtes Kind,/ Werf alle meine Sünd" (I, your troubled child, cast all my sins). The associated chorale melody in the Thuringian variant is "Wo soll ich fliehen hin"/"Auf meinen lieben Gott" (In my beloved God), a penitential (Confessional Catechism hymn. For further details, see BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity8.htm, Musical Context of Bach Cantatas: Motets & Chorales for 8th Sunday after Trinity]

2. BWV 179 "Siehe zu, daß deine Gottesfurcht nicht Heuchelei sei" (See that your fear of God is not hypocrisy) was first performed on a double bill with Cantata BWV 199 on 8/8/1723. It is a chorus cantata (2 oboes, 2 oboes da caccia, strings, bc) (19 minutes), possibly set to a Christian Weiss Sr. text. The chorale text author is Christoph Tietze (1663), "Ich armer Mensch, ich armer Sünder" (I poor man, I poor sinner). The Gospel reference is Luke 18: 13b, when the Publican says: "God be merciful to me a sinner."
This <omnes tempore>7-stanza general plea for mercy is not found in the <NLGB>. Further details are found in the recent BCW discussions of Chorale Cantata BWV 93 (Trinity 8) and Cantata BWV 88 (Trinity 9). For the text, see BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale025-Eng3.htm. The chorale melody (<omnes tempore>) is Georg Neumark's (1657) "Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten" (Who only the loving God lets govern). [See, BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity5.htm, Chorales for the 5th Sunday after Trinity (Cantata BWV 93)]

3. BWV 113 "Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut" (Lord Jesus Christ, you highest good), first performed 8/20/1724 is chorale cantata using the text and melody of Bartholomäus Ringwaldt; Buß Lied (Repent Song), NLGB No. 181 (general <omnes tempore> penitential hymn [See, BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity9.htm, Solo Cantata BWV 168, Associated Chorales.]

4. For the 11th Sunday after Trinity in 1725 (August 12), no performance is documented.

5. On 9/1/1726, Bach performed Cantata JLB 15, "Durch sein Erkentniss wird er, mein Knecht" (Through its recognition will he, my servant), to a Rudolstadt text. It has two chorales. Movement No. 7b has the hymn text "Zion klagt mit Angst und Schermez" (Zion mourns with anxiety and pain), NLGB 294, a "Klag und Buß Lied" (Lament & Repent Song). The hymn also was set for the <omnes tempore> Second Sunday after Epiphany in Cantata BWV 13/3, alto aria, Stanza 2) to the associated melody, "Freu dich sehr o meine Seele (Rejoice greatly, o my soul). The closing chorale, Movement No. 8, is "Wo soll ich fliehen hin"/"Auf meinen lieben Gott"; text (Stanza 10): "Darum allein auf dich,/ Herr Christ, verlaß ich mich" (Therefore on you alone, Lord Christ, I rely). See Cantata BWV 199 above for details.

In addition, for the 11th Sunday after Trinity in 1728 (August 8), the Picander published cycle lists Cantata P-54, "Ich scheue mich, Gerechter Gott" (I shy away, righteous God) to the Johann Rist chorale "Werde munter mein Gemüte" (harmonized in plain chorales BWV 359-60). It is listed in the <NLGB> as No. 208, "Morgengesänge (Morning Song), melody to various texts. The Cantata text closes with Stanza 6, "Laß mich diese Nacht empfinden/ Eine sanft und süße Ruh" (Let me experience this night/ a sweet and gentle rest. Although Bach did not set this text, it appears that Picander, probably with the blessing of Bach and the Consistory, approved the text for publication.

In summary, the cantatas Bach presented or considered for the 11th Sunday after Trinity in Leipzig between 1723 and 1728 are a balance between law and gospel, moving toward the affirmative, as are the Trinity Time chorales prescribed for the 11th Sunday after Trinity in Leipzig which Bach did not use in the cantatas he presented on that Sunday. They rely primarily on repentance hymns prescribed in the Dresden hymn schedules for this day, observes Günther Stiller, <JSB and Liturgical Life in Leipzig>: 243f.

Trinity Time Chorales Repeated

"The chorales are less specifically prescribed for this Sunday, having all been options for earlier Sundays in the Trinity season, observes Douglas Cowling's 10/6, [BachCantatas] Motets & Chorales for Trinity 11;BCW: http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/BachCantatas/message/35726.

In <Das Neu Leipziger Gesangbuch> (1682), for the 11th Sunday after Trinity, four thematic chorales featured in previous Trinity Time Sundays are listed, as well as the repeat appearances of two Trinity Time Luther Catechism chorales: the penitential hymn setting of Psalm 130, the <De profundis>, "Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir" (Out of the depths I cry to thee), and the setting of the Lord's Prayer, "Vater unser im Himmelreich" (Our Father in the heavenly kingdom).

1. "Erbarm dich mein, o Herre Gott," Psalm 51 (Prayer for Forgiveness), NLGB 256, (Tr. 3, 13, 14, 22)
2. "O Herre Gott begnade mich," Psa51 meditation, NLGB 257 (Tr, 13, 19, 22)
3. "Allein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ (Catechism-Confession), NLGB 178 (Tr. 3, Tr. 22, Tr. 24)
For Bach's uses of these chorales, see BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity3.htm; Motets & Chorales for 3rd Sunday after Trinity, CHORALES for Pulpit and Communion Hymns.

4. "Es ist das Heil uns kommen her" (It is the salvation that comes to us); omnes tempore proclamation) NLGB p. 230 (no hymn number) (Eph. 4, Setuagesima; Tr. 6, 13, 18), see BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity6.htm; Musical Context of Bach Cantatas: Motets & Chorales for 6th Sunday after Trinity, Hymn of the Day.

5. "Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir" (Tr. 1, 19, 21), NLGB No. 270; Motets & Chorales for 6th Sunday after Trinity, William Hoffman wrote (June 10, 2011), Trinity Time Chorales for Various Services:
`Bach also set another Luther Psalm chorale: "Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir" (Out of the depths I cry to Thee) the <de profundis" (Psalm 130) as Chorale Cantata BWV 38 for Trinity +21, as well as the organ chorale preludes BWV 686 Clavierübung (Catechism), and BWV 1099 (Neumeister). The melody is listed in the Orgelbüchlein as an <omne tempore> Catechism chorale, No. 67, "Confession, Penitence, and Justification," but not set.' See, BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity1.htm,

6. "Vater unser im Himmelreich" (Tr. 7, 15, 25), NLGB No. 175; see BCW, http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity7.htm, Motets & Chorales for 7th Sunday after Trinity.

 

Cantata 113, Trinity +11 Cantatas, Liturgy, Motets, Chorales

William Hoffman wrote (August 14, 2014):
CANTATA 113, Part 2

Bach probably produced/presented more music for the 11th Sunday after Trinity than any other Trinity Time Sunday, as a well-ordered church music to the glory of God. The list includes sacred cantatas, polyphonic introit motet Psalm on the De profundis (Psalm 130) and Psalm 51, Miserere mei, Deus (Have mercy upon me, O God, KJV), Bach German motets, and settings of related penitential psalms and German chorales. The music shows the dominant theme of repentance, based on the Gospel "Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican" (Luke 18:9-14), involving the Lutheran contrast between the Old Testament law observance of the proud, priestly Pharisee and the Gospel of the humble Publican, a Roman contractor and servant, with his plea of mercy as a sinner as his justification. It demonstrates the Lutheran concept of the "New Life of Righteousness” in the second group of five Sundays after Trinity, preceded by the initial cycle dealing with "The Kingdom of Grace” and the "Call" to enter therein.

The four cantatas and their associated penitential chorales are the alto solo BWV 199, "Mein Herze schwimmt im Blut" (My heart swims in blood); chorus Cantata BWV 179, "Siehe zu, daß deine Gottesfurcht nicht Heuchelei sei" (See that your fear of God is not hypocrisy); chorale Cantata 113, "Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut" (Lord Jesus Christ, you highest good), and Johann Ludwig Bach, JLB-15, "Durch sein Erkentniss wird er, mein Knecht" (Through its recognition will he, my servant). In addition, Bach’s early memorial service chorus Cantata BWV 131, “Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, Herr, zu dir” (Out of the depths I cry, Lord, to you), and the penitential Psalm 51 setting, "Tilge, Höchester, meine Sünden" (Blot out, Highest, My Sins), BWV 1083, are appropriate for the 11th Sunday after Trinity, says Martin Petzoldt in his BACH Commentar.1

The Introit Psalm for the 11th Sunday after Trinity is penitential Psalm 130, De profundis (Out of the depths have I cried to thee, O Lord), says Petzoldt (Ibid.: 249). Petzoldt calls Psalm 130 the “Prayer for the Forgiveness of Sins.” Bach set Psalm 130 as Cantata 131, “Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, Herr, zu dir,” for a Mühlhaüsen memorial service in 1707 and it includes the Ringwaldt chorale, “Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut.” Bach also composed chorale Cantata BWV 38, “Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir” (Luther’s De profundis setting) for the 21st Sunday after Trinity 1724 (BCML Discussion, October 19). Besides the Bach adaptation of Pergolesi’s Stabat mater, BWV 1058, Bach quoted lines in his cantatas and harmonized chorales based on Psalm 51, Miserere mei, Deus (Have mercy upon me, O God, KJV).

Chorales and Sacred Texts for 11th Sunday After Trinity, “Motets & Chorales for 11th Sunday after Trinity,” http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity11.htm.
<<William Hoffman wrote (November 8, 2011): Bach's church music for the 11th Sunday after Trinity is grounded in traditional Lutheran teaching and music, with the dominant theme of repentance as part of the Lutheran concept of the "New Life of Righteousness." It is the last of the six Sundays of this Trinity Time conceptual cycle that began on the 5th Sunday after Trinity, preceded by the initial cycle dealing with "The Kingdom of Grace and the "Call" to enter therein.

The texts and chorales relate to the Sunday Gospel, Luke 18: 9-14, the "Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican," are found only in the third Gospel. They show the Lutheran contrast between the Old Testament law observance of the proud, priestly Pharisee and the Gospel of the humble Publican, a Roman contractor and servant, with his plea of mercy as a sinner as his justification. The parable of the two contrasting men also represents the Middle Trinity Time Gospel pairing of Jesus' parables and miracles, in this case with the Gospel for the subsequent 12th Sunday after Trinity: Mark 7: 31-37, "Miracle of the Deaf Man," the first of Jesus' healing miracles at the beginning of his public ministry. Thus the theme of repentance is couple with healing.

The Leipzig cantor presented four different cantatas between 1723 and 1726, utilizing a variety of texts and penitential chorales: Cantatas BWV 199 (soprano solo), BWV 179 (chorus), and BWV 113 (chorale cantata), as well as a Rudolstadt one-part cantata of cousin Johann Ludwig in 1726.

The titles of the cantatas and their chorales reveal various facets of humility, penitence and ultimate justification:

*Cantata BWV 199, "My heart swims in blood," with the hymn stanza "I, your troubled child, cast all my sins" from the hymn "Where should I fly from here";
*Cantata BWV 179, "See that your fear of God is not hypocrisy," to the opening hymn stanza, "I poor man, I poor sinner," set to the melody, "Who only the loving God lets govern";
*Cantata BWV 113, "Lord Jesus Christ, you highest good," with the closing Stanza 8, "Strengthen me with your joyful spirit"; and
*JLB-15, "Through thy recognition will he, my servant" with two different chorales: "Zion mourns with anxiety and pain" and stanza 10, "Therefore on you alone, Lord Christ, I rely" from "Where should I fly from here," also found in Cantata BWV 199.

Re-enforcing the theme of repentance is the central Christian doctrine of the Resurrection of Christ, found in this Sunday's Epistle, 1 Corinthians 15: 1-10, the Apostle Paul's testimonial of Christ's resurrection. Together with other readings, they

Attention is called to Francis Browne's 10/6, [BachCantatas] "BWV 199 Notes on the text"; BCW http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/BWV199-Eng3.htm, scroll down to “Notes on the text.”

"The tax collectors plea, "Gott sei mir Sünder gnädig" [God, be gracious to me, a sinner] is placed in the centre of the text as the turning point where anguish for sin turns to repentance and hope," found in No. 3, Recitative strings, "Doch Gott muß mir gnädig sein" (But God must be gracious to me). Here is the Lutheran pivot point in many of Bach's Trinity Time cantatas, when the text shifts from the Law that condemns to the Gospel that redeems from the law's condemnation, often with tonal allegory key shifting upwards (anabasis).

This focus on the Gospel's answer to the Law's question is "fundamental to Lutheran Theology" and is one of Bach's "Theo-Musico Hermeneutics," says theologian and scholar Robin Leaver in "Motive and Motif in the Church music of JSB."3 "The theological distinction between law and gospel frequently provides the ground plan for a good many of Bach's cantatas." The other three hermeneutics or explanatory devices, says Leaver, involve the Doctrine of the Trinity, the theme of Discipleship, and the use of the chorale melody. "Again and again in Bach's vocal works, he underscores Christological meaning by adding a further musical dimension to the text being set. Frequently he will use a chorale melody to achieve this end," Leaver observers.

The 11th Sunday after Trinity, closes the six-Sunday Trinity Time internal cycle of the "New Life of Righteousness." The previous five Sundays after Trinity had focused on the "New Life of Righteousness" in Jesus, replacing the Old Righteousness of the Law of the Scribes and Pharisees; the "holding out" for a "better righteousness"; adding to it the "gift of God"; warning of the false doctrines and prophets; and exhorting to that new life the necessity of faith, loyalty, fidelity, and stewardship, says Paul Zeller Strodach, The Church Year.4

Here are the four Cantatas, BWV 199, BWV 179, BWV 113, and JLB-15 with summaries of their chorales that are mainstays of the first half of Trinity Time Sundays:

1. BWV 199 "Mein Herze schwimmt im Blut" (My heart swims in blood); performances, 8/12/1714 (C Minor version), 1718-22 (?violin=soprano), and 8/8/1723 (D Minor version) is a soprano solo cantata with strings, and basso continuo. Cantata BWV 199 is set to a Georg Christian Lehms 1711 text (Movements Nos. 1-5, 7-8. Movement No. 6 is soprano chorale trio aria, chorale text of Johann Heermann (1630) the 11-stanza penitential and general communion hymn, "Wo soll ich fliehen hin" (Where should I fly from here). It is listed in the <Neu Leipziger Gesangbuch> (NLGB, 1682) as No. 182, a Buß Lied (Repent Song), and specifically as a communion hymn for the 3rd Sunday after Trinity. The soprano sings Stanza 3, "Ich, dein betrübtes Kind,/ Werf alle meine Sünd" (I, your troubled child, cast all my sins). The associated chorale melody in the Thuringian variant is "Wo soll ich fliehen hin"/"Auf meinen lieben Gott" (In my beloved God), a penitential (Confessional Catechism hymn. For further details, see BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity8.htm, Musical Context of Bach Cantatas: Motets & Chorales for 8th Sunday after Trinity]

2. BWV 179 "Siehe zu, daß deine Gottesfurcht nicht Heuchelei sei" (See that your fear of God is not hypocrisy) was first performed on a double bill with Cantata BWV 199 on 8/8/1723. It is a chorus cantata (2 oboes, 2 oboes da caccia, strings, bc) (19 minutes), possibly set to a Christian Weiss Sr. text. The chorale text author is Christoph Tietze (1663), "Ich armer Mensch, ich armer Sünder" (I poor man, I poor sinner). The Gospel reference is Luke 18: 13b, when the Publican says: "God be merciful to me a sinner." This <omnes tempore>7-stanza general plea for mercy is not found in the <NLGB>. Further details are found in the recent BCW discussions of Chorale Cantata BWV 93 (Trinity 5) and Cantata BWV 88 (Trinity 9). For the text, see BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale025-Eng3.htm. The chorale melody (<omnes tempore>) is Georg Neumark's (1657) "Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten" (Who only the loving God lets govern). [See, BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity5.htm, Chorales for the 5th Sunday after Trinity (Cantata BWV 93)]

3. BWV 113 "Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut" (Lord Jesus Christ, you highest good), first performed 8/20/1724 is chorale cantata using the text and melody of Bartholomäus Ringwaldt; Buß Lied (Repent Song), NLGB No. 181, general omnes tempore penitential hymn. Chorale Text and Melody of Bartholomäus Ringwaldt, “Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut” are cast in Bar form, with 8 stanzas of 7 lines, dating to 1588. The unaltered hymn stanzas are in Mvts. 1, 2, 4, 8), while the anonymous librettist(s) paraphrase Mvts. 3-7). The Cantata 113 libretto, Francis Browne English translation, is at BCW http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/BWV113-Eng3.htm. Ringwalt (1530-1599) BCW Short Biography, http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Ringwaldt.htm. The hymn is classified as a Catechism penitential song or Buß Lied (Repent Song), found in the Neu Leipziger Gesangbuch of 1682 (NLGB) as No. 181 (general omnes tempore penitential Lenten hymn). The text was first published in Ringaldt’s Christliche Warnung des Trewen Eckarts (Frankfort a. Oder, 1588). Ringwalt hymn text (EKG 167) and Francis Browne English translation, are found at BCW http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale008-Eng3.htm. Melody, Ringwalt No. 1 text set is set to the melody, also attributed to Ringwaldt (Zahn 4486), first published in Dresden Gesangbuch (1593), “Chorale Melodies used in Bach's Vocal Works,” BCW http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/Herr-Jesu-Christ-du-hochstes.htm. Melody also used in Text No. 2, Ringwalt “Herr Jesu Christ, ich weiß gar wohl” (1582, NLGB No. 333, Death & Dying), Bach’s use, BWV 166/3 soprano chorale trio aria (S. 3, “Ich bitte dich, Her Jesu Christ); Text No. 3, unknown Freiberg 1620 (not in NLGB), “Herr Jesu Christ, ich schrei zu dir,” Bach’s use BWV 48/7 plain chorale (S. 12, Herr Jesu Christ, einiger Trost. [See, BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity9.htm, Solo Cantata BWV 168, Associated Chorales.]. Untexted (melody only), BWV 48/1 (1723), BWV 334 (PC), NC 1114 (b1710).

4. For the 11th Sunday after Trinity in 1725 (August 12), no performance is documented.

5. On 9/1/1726, Bach performed Cantata JLB 15, "Durch sein Erkentniss wird er, mein Knecht" (Through its recognition will he, my servant), to a Rudolstadt text. It has two chorales. Movement No. 7b has the hymn text "Zion klagt mit Angst und Schermez" (Zion mourns with anxiety and pain), NLGB 294, a "Klag und Buß Lied" (Lament& Repent Song). The hymn also was set for the <omnes tempore> Second Sunday after Epiphany in Cantata BWV 13/3, alto aria, Stanza 2) to the associated melody, "Freu dich sehr o meine Seele (Rejoice greatly, o my soul). The closing chorale, Movement No. 8, is "Wo soll ich fliehen hin"/"Auf meinen lieben Gott"; text (Stanza 10): "Darum allein auf dich,/ Herr Christ, verlaß ich mich" (Therefore on you alone, Lord Christ, I rely). See Cantata BWV 199 above for details.

In addition, for the 11th Sunday after Trinity in 1728 (August 8), the Picander published cycle lists Cantata P-54, "Ich scheue mich, Gerechter Gott" (I shy away, righteous God) to the Johann Rist chorale "Werde munter mein Gemüte" (harmonized in plain chorales BWV 359-60). It is listed in the <NLGB> as No. 208, "Morgengesänge (Morning Song), melody to various texts. The Cantata text closes with Stanza 6, "Laß mich diese Nacht empfinden/ Eine sanft und süße Ruh" (Let me experience this night/ a sweet and gentle rest. Although Bach did not set this text, it appears that Picander, probably with the blessing of Bach and the Consistory and Town Council, approved the text for publication.

In summary, the cantatas Bach presented or considered for the 11th Sunday after Trinity in Lig between 1723 and 1728 are a balance between law and gospel, moving toward the affirmative, as are the Trinity Time chorales prescribed for the 11th Sunday after Trinity in Leipzig which Bach did not use in the cantatas he presented on that Sunday. They rely primarily on repentance hymns prescribed in the Dresden hymn schedules for this day, observes Günther Stiller in JSB and Liturgical Life in Leipzig. 5

Motet/Cantata BWV 1083, “Tilge, Höchester, meine Sünden" (Blot out, Highest, My Sins), BWV 1083, penitential Psalm 51 set to Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater, was performed in Leipzig c. 1746-47). Full details are available at BCW http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV1083.htm, especially at BCML “General Discussions - Part 2 (3rd round),” http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV1083-Gen2.htm, scroll down to

“William Hoffman wrote (June 24, 2012): Introduction to BWV 1083 -- The Dresden Connection?.”

Psalm 51 English Text (KJV) & Bach Cantata References

Here is the Psalm 51 English text (King James Version) and references in other Bach cantatas:

1. Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy loving-kindness: according unto the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my transgressions. ["tender mercies" or "goodness" of the Lord, Misericordias Domini (Second Sunday after Easter, Shepherd Cantatas 85, 104, 112]
2. Wash me thoroughly from mine iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin.
3. For I acknowledge my transgressions: and my sin is ever before me. [Cantata 97/5]
4. Against thee, thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil in thy sight: that thou mightest be justified when thou speakest, and be clear when thou judgest. (Rom. 3.4) [Cantata 132/4]
5. Behold, I was shapen in iniquity; and in sin did my mother conceive me.
6. Behold, thou desirest truth in the inward parts: and in the hidden part thou shalt make me to know wisdom.
7. Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow. [Cantata 78/1]
8. Make me to hear joy and gladness; that the bones which thou hast broken may rejoice.
9. Hide thy face from my sins, and blot out all mine iniquities.
10. Create in me a clean heart, O God; and renew a right spirit within me.
11. Cast me not away from thy presence; and take not thy Holy Spirit from me.
12. Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation; and uphold me with thy free Spirit. [Cantata 25/4]
13. Then will I teach transgressors thy ways; and sinners shall be converted unto thee. [Cantata 194/11]
14. Deliver me from bloodguiltiness, O God, thou God of my salvation: and my tongue shall sing aloud of thy righteousness.
15. O Lord, open thou my lips; and my mouth shall show forth thy praise. [Cantata 68/4]
16. For thou desirest not sacrifice; else would I give it: thou delightest not in burnt offering.
17. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.
18. Do good in thy good pleasure unto Zion: build thou the walls of Jerusalem. [Cantata 199/3]
19. Then shalt thou be pleased with the sacrifices of righteousness with burnt offering and whole burnt offering: then shall they offer bullocks upon thine altar.
(http://www.bartleby.com/108/19/51.html)

De profundis Psalm 130 Motet Settings


The polyphonic Latin motet settings of the De profundis could include works of Josquin Desprez, Michel Richard Delalande, and Orlando Lassus, and the German settings of Heinrich Schütz. In addition, Bach could have performed penitential German motets such as BWV 118, “O Jesu Christ, meins Lebens Licht,” BWV Anh. 159, “Ich lasse dich nicht, du segnest mich”; BWV 227, “Jesu, meine Freude”; BWV 228, Furchte dich nicht, ich bin bei dir; BWV 229, Komm, Jesu, komm, mein Leib ist Mude; and BWV 230, lobet den Herrn, alle Heiden.

Among the plain chorale, sacred song, and organ chorale preludes are possibly the following:

“Penitence and amendment” (Confession, Penitence & Justification) see also Lent (Passiontide)
OB 67. “Aus tiefer Noth schrei ich zu dir” (From deep affliction I cry out to you, Psalm 130, Luther) (Zahn 4438, NLGB 270, Christian Life & Conduct, Psalm); BWV 686-7(OBIII), BWV 1099(NC); also CC 38 (Tr.+21)
68. “Erbarm’ dich mein, O Herre Gott” (CT Erhard Hegenwald 1524, Have mercy on me, O Lord God; Psalm 51, NLGB No. 256; CM J. G. Walther Gesangbuch 1524); BWV 305(PC), 721(MC)
69. “Jesu, der du meine Seele”(Jesus, by whom my soul, CT Johann Rist 1641, CM Paxis pieta 1662); BWV 352-4(PC), BWV 752(MC); also CC 78 (Tr.+14)
70. “Allein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ” (Alone toward you, Lord Jesus Christ; T Johann Schneesing 1542, CM Valentin Babst Gesangbuch 1545; NLGB No. 178, Catechism BWV 261(PC), BWV 1100 (NC); also CC 33 (Tr.+13)
71. “Ach Gott und Herr” (Ah God and Lord; CT Martin Rutilius 1604; CT hmnodus sacer, Leipzig 1625 NLGB No. 180, Catechism) BWV 255(PC), BWV 692-3(KC, J. G. Walther); BWV 714 (MC in NC)
72. “Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut” ; BWV 334(PC); ?BWV1114(NC);
73. “Ach Herr, mich armen Sünder” (Ah Lord, poor sinner that I am, CT Cyriacus Schneegas 1597; melody “Herzlich tut, mich verlangen,” Hans Leo Hassler 1601; NLGB No. 246, Christian Life & Conduct, Psalm 13 Usquequo, Domine, How long wilt thou forget me, O Lord? (KJV); BWV 270-71(PC), BWV 742(MC, NC); also CC 135 (Tr. +3)
74. “Wo soll ich fliehen hin” (Where should I fly from here?, CT Johann Heermann 1630), NLGB No. 182, Catechism); BWV646(SC)=188/6, 694(KC); cf melody Auf meinen lieben Gott” (In my beloved God, Jacob Regnart 1609, NLGB No. 299, Zahn 2164, “Cross, Persecution & Challenge” (OB136)
(Judgment; Death and the Grave (/Dying, Death & Eternity)
75. “Wir haben schwerlich” (Zahn 2099) (no NLGB); no Bach setting
76. BWV 637 — “Durch Adams Fall ist ganz verderbt” (Through Adam’s fall is completely corrupted, Lazarus Spengler 1524, NLGB No. 229, Justification; CM anon. 1525 Zahn 7546) BWV 705(KC); 1101(NC), alt. mel. “Ich ruf zu dir, H.J.C.” (I call to you, Lord Jesus Christ, Joseph Klug Gesangbuch 1535, Zahn 2496), OB 91, BWV 639; also CC BWV 177(Tr.4), BWV 1124(PC)
77. BWV 638 — “Es ist das Heil uns kommen her” (Salvation has come to us; CT Paul Speratus 1523, CM Wittenberg 1524, NLGB No. 230, Justification (Zahn 4430); also CC BWV 9 (Tr.+6)
Saturday Penitential Vespers and Vesper Penitential Psalms (7), 6, 32, 38, 51, 102, 130, and 143
No OB -- “Ach, was soll ich Sünder machen?” (Ah, what shall I poor sinner do?), Johann Flittner (1661); NLGB 389 (“Death & Dying”), BWV 259(PC); BWV 770(CP-?spurious); also SG No. 66 (tuneless)
-- “Christe, du Beistand deiner Kreuzgemeine” (Christ, defender of your congregation) Matthäus Appelles von Löwenstein (Justification & Penance, no NLGB), BWV 275(PC)
-- “Eins ist not! ach Herr, dies eine” (One thing I lack, O lord) CT Johann Heinrich Schröder, CM Freylinghausen (Halle), 1704; BWV 304(PC) (Zahn 7127), BWV 453(SG, #112)
-- “Erwürgtes Lamm, das die verwahrten Siegel” (Slain lamb, who broke the kept seals), CT U.B. v. Bonin (1704), CM Freylinghausen (Halle) 1704; BWV 455(SG, Justification & Penance)
-- “Herr, ich habe Mißgehandelt” (Lord, I have done wrong), CT Johann Franck (1674), CM Johann Crüger (Berlin 1649); BWV 330-31(PC)=?BWV 247/32
-- “Herr, nicht schicke deine Rache” (Psalm 6, Domine, ne in furore, Lord, rebuke me not in thine anger); BWV 463(SG, Bußlieder)
-- “Mache dich, mein Geist bereit” (Make yourself ready, my spirit; CT Johann Burchard Freystein 1697), CM Johann Georg Albinius “Straf mich nicht in deinem Zorn” (O Lord, do not punish me in your anger, 1681, NLGB 244, “Christian Life & Conduct, Psalm 6); CC BWV 115 (Tr.+22)
-- “Mein Jesu, dem die Seraphinen” Wolfgang Christph Dreßler (1692); BWV 486(SG) “Vindication/Juistification”
-- “Wo ist mein Schäflein, das ich liebe” (Where is my little shepherd, whom I love, Julia Patientia von Schultt, 1701); BWV 507(SG, Bußlieder,)
-- “Tilge, Höchester, meine Sunden” (Blot out, Highest, My Sins; Psalm 51, ), motet; Pergolesi Stabat mater, Vesper hymn, BWV 1083

Introductory Psalm Motets

“NOTES: Like Tr9, no motets are listed for Trinity 11, unlike the preceding week, Trinity 10, which has four options,” says Douglas Cowling, BCW “Musical Context of Bach Cantatas, Motets & Chorales for 11th Sunday after Trinity,” http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity11.htm. Given the generic, omnes tempore texts of many of the Trinity season motets, Bach may well have chosen from the preceding Sunday¹s list.2

The use of Psalm motets in the main services for 10 Sunday after Trinity are found in the “Musical Context: Motets & Chorales for 10th Sunday after Trinity,” http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity10.htm (Douglas Cowling wrote (October 24, 2011). “NOTES: Unlike Trinity 9 which had no prescribed motets, Trinity 10 has four motets with three settings of text from Psalm 137, “By the Waters of Babylon” [Super flumina of Tibutio Massaine (Massaini), Orlando (di Lasso?), and Melchior Vulpius; and one of Psalm 126, “When the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion.” In addition, The Main Service Introit Psalm for the 10th Sunday after Trinity is Psalm 5, Verba mea airbus (Give ear to my words, O Lord (KJV), Psalm of David to Chief Musician upon Nehiloth; https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm+5&version=KJV (Psalm 5 full text). The Babylonian motets are related to the Trinity 10 Hymn of the Day, “An Wasserflüssen Babylon,” based on the same psalm text. The texts may have been chosen to complement the Gospel, Luke 19:41-48, which describes Christ weeping over the future destruction of Jerusalem.

The Introit Psalm for the 11th Sunday after Trinity is penitential Psalm 130, De profundis (Out of the depths have I cried to thee, O Lord), says Martin Petzoldt in BACH Kommentar, Vol. 1, Trinity Sundays.4 Petzoldt calls Psalm 130 the “Prayer for the Forgiveness of Sins.” Bach set Psalm 130 as Cantata 131, “Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, Herr, zu dir,” for a Mühlhaüsen memorial service in 1707 and it includes the Ringwaldt chorale, “Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut.” Bach also composed chorale Cantata BWV 38, “Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir” (Luther’s setting) for the 21st Sunday after Trinity 1724 (BCML Discussion, October 19). The sermon following Cantata 113 on August 20, 1724, was given at the early service of St. Thomas by Pastor Christian Weisse (1671-1736) but is not extant, says Petzoldt (Ibid.: 282).

Bach may have presented motet settings of the De profundis, the two best known being Josquin Desprez (c. 1440-1521), and Michel Richard Delalande [de Lalande] (1657-1726). Often referred to simply as Josquin, he composed two “De profundis” settings, including motet for 4 parts (1520, poss. spurious), Amazon.com. Delalande’s Grand Motet “De Profundis,” etc. are found at Higginbottom (Erato), http://www.answers.com/topic/michel-richard-delalande. Clemens non Papa (c.1510/15 –1555/56) setting is found at http://www.brabantensemble.com/discography/clemens-non-papa-missa-pro-defunctis-penitential-motets/. A comparison of Josquin and Orlando Lassus (1532-94) penitential psalms settings (1559) is at http://www.haverford.edu/musc/multimedia/renaissance/Van%20Berg/DEPROF.html. Heinrich Schütz (1585-1672) systematically produced settings of the psalms, including produced “Aus der Tiefe, SWV 25, and “Aus tiefer Not, SWV 235, but no Latin version of the De profundis is extant.

Chorales for the 11th Sunday after Trinity (NLGB)

HYMN OF DAY (de tempore) "Allein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ,” http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale111-Eng3.hm; Digital sample: http://ingeb.org/hymn_a.htm
CHORALES for Pulpit and Communion Hymns: "Aus tiefer Not,” http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale085-Eng3.htm; "Herr Gott ich ruf zu dir,” “Ebarm dich mein” [also Trinity 3], “O Herr Gott begnade mich” [also Trinity 3], “Es ist das Heil” [also Trinity 6], http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale020-Eng3.htm Digital sample: http://ingeb.org/spiritua/esistdas.mid; “Vater unser im Himmelreich [also Trinity 5, Trinity 7]; http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale049-Eng3.htm; Digital sample: http://ingeb.org/spiritua/vateruns.mid

Trinity Time Chorales Repeat
ed

"The chorales are less specifically prescribed for this Sunday, having all been options for earlier Sundays in the Trinity season,” observes Douglas Cowling's 10/6, [BachCantatas] Motets & Chorales for Trinity 11;

In <Das Neu Leipziger Gesangbuch> (1682), for the 11th Sunday after Trinity, four thematic chorales featured in previous Trinity Time Sundays are listed, as well as the repeat appearances of two Trinity Time Luther Catechism chorales: the penitential hymn setting of Psalm 130, the <De profundis>, "Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir" (Out of the depths I cry to thee), and the setting of the Lord's Prayer, "Vater unser im Himmelreich" (Our Father in the heavenly kingdom).

1. "Erbarm dich mein, o Herre Gott," Psalm 51 (Prayer for Forgiveness, Christian Life & Conduct, Penitence and amendment [Confession, Penitence & Justification]), NLGB 256 (Tr. 3, 13, 14, 22; Bar form, 5 stanzas text Erhart Hegenwalt 1524); Johann Walter melody Geystlich Gesangk-Buchelyn 1524 (Zahn 5851); Bach’s use BWV 305, plain chorale; listed in OB 68 but not set; BWV 721 (MC).
2. "O Herre Gott begnade mich," Psalm 51 meditation, NLGB 257 (Tr. 13, 19, 22); Matheus Greitters , 5 stanzas, Zahn 8451; not set by Bach
3. "Allein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ (Catechism-Confession), NLGB 178 (Tr. 3, Tr. 22, Tr. 24); chorale Cantata 33 (Trinity 13); For Bach's uses of these chorales, see BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity3.htm; Motets & Chorales for 3rd Sunday after Trinity, CHORALES for Pulpit and Communion Hymns.
4. "Es ist das Heil uns kommen her" (It is the salvation that comes to us); omnes tempore proclamation) NLGB p. 230 (no hymn number) (Eph. 4, Septuagesima; Tr. 6, 13, 18), see BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity6.htm; Musical Context of Bach Cantatas: Motets & Chorales for 6th Sunday after Trinity, Hymn of the Day.
5. "Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir" (Tr. 1, 19, 21), NLGB No. 270; Motets & Chorales for 6th Sunday after Trinity, William Hoffman wrote (June 10, 2011), Trinity Time Chorales for Various Services: `Bach also set another Luther Psalm chorale: "Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir" (Out of the depths I cry to Thee) the <de profundis" (Psalm 130) as Chorale Cantata BWV 38 for Trinity +21, as well as the organ chorale preludes BWV 686 Clavierübung (Catechism), and BWV 1099 (Neumeister). The melody is listed in the Orgelbüchlein as an <omne tempore> Catechism chorale, No. 67, "Confession, Penitence, and Justification," but not set.' See, BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity1.htm,
6. "Vater unser im Himmelreich" (Tr. 7, 15, 25), NLGB No. 175; see BCW, http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity7.htm, Motets & Chorales for 7th Sunday after Trinity.

Bach’s performance calendar, 11th Sunday after Trinity, Cantatas:

*BWV 199 Mein Herze schwimmt im Blut (Weimar, 1714), alto solo, repeated 8/8/1723 with BWV 179
*BWV 179 Siehe zu, daß deine Gottesfurcht nicht Heuchelei sei (Leipzig, 8/8/1723), chorus cantata
*BWV 113 Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut (Leipzig, 8/20/1724), chorale cantata, probably repeated August 26, 1732 as part of repeat of Cycle 2 chorale cantatas.
*JLB 15, "Durch sein Erkentniss wird er, mein Knecht," (Leipzig, 9/1/726.
BWV 1083, Tilge, Höchester, meine Sünden" (Blot out, Highest, My Sins), BWV 1083, penitential Psalm 51 set to Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater (Leipzig c. 1746-47.

Thomas Braatz wrote (August 18, 2002): BWV 113 - Provenance (BCW, http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Ref/BWV113-Ref.htm)
<<The autograph score: At the distribution of J. S. Bach’s estate, this score went to W. F. Bach. The sequence of owners looks like this: W.F. Bach >> unknown owner >> Carl Pistor >> Adolf Rudorff >> Ernst Rudorff >> Music Library of the Peters Music Publishing Firm, Leipzig >>private owner in the USA >>private owner in West Germany >>since 1982 on continuous loan to the International Bachakademie Stuttgart, Germany.

The original parts: Almost all of the original parts for cantatas from the 2nd yearly Leipzig cycle, of which this is one, were in the library of the St. Thomas School in Leipzig. This is one of the very few sets that are missing from that entire yearly cycle. Mendelssohn already notes that he could not find them there in 1841, and the BG did not have access to them either for its printed edition of this work. [On Sept. 29, 1755, St. Thomas prefect Christian Friedrich Penzel copied a full score (P1034) from a set of parts, presumably for performance, the source probably being the original set of parts at the Thomas School, now lost. 1st performance: August 20, 1724 [Dürr] Later performances in Bach’s lifetime are probable, but no evidence of this has been found.

Text: The librettist is unknown and the printed text has not survived. Judging on the basis of the style of poetry, Harald Streck in his “Die Verskunst in den poetischen Texten zu den Kantaten J. S. Bachs” Hamburg, 1971, pp. 181, has found certain parallels to the texts of Salomo Franck and states that certain passages are reminiscent of Franck’s style, but he does not go so far as to consider Franck as the actual author. Verses, see above>>

FOOTNOTES

1 Petzoldt, Martin. Bach Kommentar: Die geistlichen Kantaten des 1. Bis 27. Trinitas-Sontagges, Vol. 1; Theologisch Musikwissenschaftlicke Kommentierung der Geistlichen Vokalwerke Johann Sebastan Bachs, Internationale Bachakademie Stuttgart (Kassel: Bärenreiter, 2004: Commentary, 249; Cantata 131 256-63, and "Tilge, Höchester,” BWV 1083, 290-302.
2 BACH'S MOTET COLLECTION: Otto Riemer, "Erhard Bodenschatz und sein Florilegium Portense,"
Schünigen: Kaminsky,1927. ML 410 B67R4. Partial Index of Motets in “Florilegium Portense with links to online scores and biographies: http://www3.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Florilegium_Portense. Dissertation on Bodenschatz Collection http://etd.ohiolink.edu/view.cgi/Chaney%20Mark%20A.pdf?osu1180461416.
3 Leaver in Bach Essays, edited by Ya Tomita (Ashgate, Burlington VT, 2011: 120ff).
4 Strodach, The Church Year: Studies in the Introits, Collects, Epistles and Gospels (United Lutheran Publication House, Philadelphia PA, 1924: 211).
5 Stiller (Concordia Publishing: St. Louis MO, 1985: 243f.

 

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