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General Discussions - Part 8: Year 2004

Continue from Part 7: Year 2003

Trying to identify a cantata

Jeremy Thomas wrote (January 8, 2004):
Please forgive my ignorance.

I am trying to identify a cantata I heard on the radio some time ago. Its movements were based on the movements of a Bach concerto - from memory, it was either an oboe concerto or a violin concerto.

I appreciate these are pretty sketchy details, but am sure that someone here will know the answer. I've searched the list archives, and the Bach cantatas website, without success.

(The particular recording I heard was performed by James Bowman, if that makes any difference, but it's the cantata I'm trying to track down rather than the individual performance.)

With grateful thanks - hoping this isn't stopping more informed debate.

Johan van Veen wrote (January 8, 2004):
[To Jeremy Thomas] That is cantata BWV 169, Gott soll allein mein Herze haben.

The Sinfonia and the aria 'Stirb in mir' are based upon a concerto which we know as the Harpsichord concerto BWV 1053, but which is presumably a later arrangement of a concerto for another instrument, perhaps the oboe.

Bradley Lehman wrote (January 8, 2004):
[To Jeremy Thomas] Jeremy, my best (quick) guess would be cantata BWV 156, "Ich steh mit einem Fuss im Grabe," which opens with the bit from the middle of the *harpsichord* concerto in F minor BWV 1056. That movement sometimes gets used as part of an oboe-concerto reconstruction, taken from this cantata along with cantata BWV 35. (That is, they take a movement from BWV 35, a movement from BWV 156, and the fragmentary concerto BWV 1059, and arrange it together as an oboe concerto.)

That opening movement of BWV 156 is also sometimes played on violin, instead of oboe: again reconstructing the harpsichord concerto BWV 1056 back into a violin concerto instead of an oboe concerto. (The assumption is that all the harpsichord concertos started life as concertos for something else, now lost, but reconstructed eagerly by modern people eager to play them on various other instruments.)
Whatever.

My second best guess would be cantata BWV 169. That's tied to several movements of the E-major harpsichord concerto BWV 1053, which is also in turn sometimes played on oboe in a reconstruction. And a Bowman recording of that BWV 169 is listed at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV169.htm

Also check cantata BWV 49, where a different movement of that same harpsichord concerto turns up. (But that cantata is only for soprano and bass; Bowman wouldn't be there.)

Robert Killinsworth wrote (January 8, 2004):
[To Jeremy Thomas] You might have heard the Virtuosi Saxoniae recording. See item M-6 at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV169-2.htm

David Glenn Lebut Jr. wrote (January 8, 2004):
[To Jeremy Thomas] I know that BWV 208 uses (in the recording by Helmuth Rilling) both BWV 1046a and BWV 1040, that BWV 1045 was used in a Kantate, and BWV 65 (or BWV 165, I don't remember which) contains a movement (the Arioso) that was used in both BWV 1056, BWV 1056R, and (according to most of the reconstructions) BWV 1059, and that the 1st movement of BWV 174 uses an orchestrated version of the first movement of BWV 1006. I also read somewhere that a movement of a Kantate was based on the first movement of another Kammerwerk.

Jeremy Thomas wrote (January 9, 2004):
To Johan, Brad, Bob & David - sincere thanks. Yes, concerto BWV 1053 (and hence cantata BWV 169) is exactly what I had in mind.

I see Bowman has recorded it on Hyperion.

Most grateful, gentlemen - and quite impressed by your memories!

 

Bach Cantatas sets

Ian Pace wrote (March 8, 2004):
Steve Molino wrote:
< Which brings me to my embarrassment - the Bach cantatas. Other than a handful of the more famous ones, I haven't heard most of Bach's cantatas. I figure there will come a time when I buckle down with some complete set and work through them, but at this point I can't envision that time. >
On that subject, for those well-disposed to HIP performances: for a complete set, would you go for Koopman or Suzuki (or Harnoncourt/Leonhardt, maybe)?

Peter Schenkman wrote (March 9, 2004):
[To Ian Pace] Helmuth Rilling on Hänssler is to my ears by far the most satisfying cycle on disc, striking as he does a good balance between the old and the new. Koopman, and Harnoncourt/Leonhardt I avoid like the plague.

Allen Tyler wrote (March 9, 2004):
[To Peter Schenkman] Agree about the Harnoncourt portion, but I like the Leonhardt contributions. Too bad he didn't do the complete set. And I also like the Rillings--I wish that I had all of them. I don't get very hung up on the HIP-nonHIP controversy--I just listen for the best insight into the music.

Alain Dagher wrote (March 9, 2004):
Ian Pace wrote:
< On that subject, for those well-disposed to HIP performances: for a complete set, would you go for Koopman or Suzuki (or Harnoncourt/Leonhardt, maybe)? >
I don't think Koopman or Suzuki are complete. I do not know Koopman, but I like very much the few Suzukis I have - very elegant Bach. Nonetheless I prefer Herreweghe to Suzuki in general, especially his more recent HM recordings.

Harnoncourt/Leonhardt is old faithful. You just can't go wrong with that set (if you like HIP of course).

Paul Ilechko wrote (March 9, 2004):
[To Alain Dagher] I have Koopman's Christmas Oratorio and I think it's very good. I don't like him as much as Gardiner, at least from what I've heard, but I like him more than Herreweghe. Actually, I think Herreweghe's creamy, almost romantic style is better in later repertory - have you heard his Brahms Requiem and Schubert D.678 ?

 

Cantatas series

Continue of discussion from: Pieter Jan Leusink & Holland Boys Choir & Netherlands Bach Collegium - Bach Cantatas & Other Vocal Works - General Discussions - Part 4

Uri Golomb wrote (June 15, 2004):
Just a brief point: In this discussion, Herreweghe was mentioned alongside Suzuki, Koopman and Leusink. If the context is complete series of the cantatas, then this is an error: Herreweghe is not planning to record a complete series, although he has recorded a substantial number (and will no doubt produce quite a few more...). I know some people here have voiced hopes that he will do the complete series. Now, I am a great admirer of Herreweghe, but perhaps there is some advantage to his avoiding a complete series, and doing just those cantatas that he really feels he wants to do (if an artist records a work simply because he wants to complete a cycle, there's always the danger that the performance will lack conviction).

Donald Satz wrote (June 15, 2004):
[To Uri Golomb] I forgot to mention the Rifkin cantata discs on Decca - the performances are outstanding and sharper than the Herreweghe.

 

Holy Bach!

Jonathan Howard wrote (July 14, 2004):
I'm still trying to find the greatest Bach recordings, this appears to be the right group, ;-p.

Now: Trevor Pinnock with the English Concert (BWV 1066-1069, Die Overturen), any better? I had some 'LaserLight' only suites 1-3 (made in 1990, West Germany). I was never quite satisfied and so I got the English Concert one. But can I get better?

Brandenburg: I've got two blue discs (forgot origin, now all ripped for security), Disc One is Concertos #1, #2 and #3, the second disc is the rest. What're the best versions?

The Goldberg Variations and the Noterbuchen (misspelled?) fur Anna Magdalena, both Gustav Leonhardt himself on the Harp, is there anyone/thing better than him?

St Matthäus's Passion (BWV 244) and the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232) I have by John Eliot Gardiner, any better?

That'll do for now, Hertz und Mund und Tat und Leben I have is an excellent version and the rest aren't such favourites of mine.

Thanks, everyone,

Bradley Lehman wrote (July 15, 2004):
Jonathan Howard wrote:
< I'm still trying to find the greatest Bach recordings, this appears to be the right group, ;-p.
Now: Trevor Pinnock with the English Concert (BWV 1066-1069, Die Overturen), any better? I had some 'LaserLight' only suites 1-3 (made in 1990, West Germany). I was never quite satisfied and so I got the English Concert one. But can I get better? >
I like Parrott's, Kuijken's, and Guttler's, especially; among dozens of others. And for something completely different, the old set of Klemperer/Philharmonia that has been reissued on Testament, from 1954. I have some of those old Pinnock/English Concert set on LPs, but I don't like them very much: lively yet bland, too streamlined, not enough shape to the phrasing....

< Brandenburg: I've got two blue discs (forgot origin, now all ripped for security), Disc One is Concertos #1, #2 and #3, the second disc is the rest. What're the best versions? >
The two I couldn't do without are Savall's and Il Giardino Armonico. But again, there are so many excellent other ones....

< The Goldberg Variations and the Noterbuchen (misspelled?) fur Anna Magdalena, both Gustav Leonhardt himself on the Harp, is there anyone/thing better than him? >
For the Goldbergs, Leonhardt has recorded them three times and my favorite among those is the last one (Deutsche Harmonia Mundi), not the Teldec (Telefunken) or Vanguard. And Hantai; I have only the earlier of his two, so far. Other members here have said nice things about the newer one. And Schiff's newest one on piano is wonderful. But again, there are 40 others that are also very enjoyable.......

Try also this review I wrote a few years ago; I should update it to mention the new Schiff, too: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~bpl/zhu-goldbergs.htm

For the Magdalena book, excerpts, the one by the continuo group "Tragicomedia" as I mentioned here a few days ago.

< St Matthäus's Passion (BWV 244) and the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232) I have by John Eliot Gardiner, any better? >
This has been discussed forever and ever on both the BCML and BRML; see
http://www.bach-cantatas.com for zillions of opinions by everybody.

So much about all these pieces is also in the list archives:
http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/BachRecordings/messages

< That'll do for now, Hertz und Mund und Tat und Leben I have is an excellent version and the rest aren't such favourites of mine. >
For some especially good harpsichord-playing, get the sets of Partitas and English Suites played by Parmentier.

David Glenn Lebut Jr. wrote (July 15, 2004):
Jonathan Howard wrote:
< I'm still trying to find the greatest Bach recordings, this appears to be the right group, ;-p.
Now: Trevor Pinnock with the English Concert (BWV 1066-1069, Die Overturen), any better? I had some 'LaserLight' only suites 1-3 (made in 1990, West Germany). I was never quite satisfied and so I got the English Concert one. But can I get better? >
Reinhard Goebel's recording (it also features BWV 1070).

John Pike wrote (July 15, 2004):
My suggestions inserted.

Jonathan Howard wrote: < I'm still trying to find the greatest Bach recordings, this appears to be the right group, ;-p.
Now: Trevor Pinnock with the English Concert (BWV 1066-1069, Die Overturen), any better? I had some 'LaserLight' only suites 1-3 (made in 1990, West Germany). I was never quite satisfied and so I got the English Concert one. But can I get better?
Brandenburg: I've got two blue discs (forgot origin, now all ripped for security), Disc One is Concertos #1, #2 and #3, the second disc is the rest. What're the best versions? >
My favourite is Reinhard Goebel with Musica Antiqua Köln. JP

< The Goldberg Variations and the Noterbuchen (misspelled?) fur Anna Magdalena, both Gustav Leonhardt himself on the Harp, is there anyone/thing better than him? >
My current favourite of the Goldbergs is Schiff's second recording.JP

< St Matthäus's Passion (BWV 244) and the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232) I have by John Eliot Gardiner, any better? >
I enjoy both of these. They were my favourites for a long time. I recently greatly enjoyed Parrott's OVPP recording of the B minor mass (BWV 232), (and Junghänel with Cantus Cölln has also been very well reviewed but I don't yet have it). For the SMP (BWV 244) I would now suggest Harnoncourt 3 or Herreweghe 1 (I haven't yet heard Herreweghe 2 or McCreesh). JP

Sw Anandgyan wrote (July 15, 2004):
Jonathan Howard wrote:
<couic> < St Matthäus's Passion (BWV 244) and the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232) I have by John Eliot Gardiner, any better? >
I'm still a beginner in this vast musical heritage, I have two versions for the BC; Leonhardt and Harnoncourt II and they are both fine to me.

Today I have amused myself listening to only two excerpts of all the SMP (BWV 244) recordings I currently own; the very first chorus 'Kommt, ihr Töchter, helft mir klagen' and the famous aria 'Erbarme Dich"

I'm by myself and hardly unanimous ;-)

Today, Herreweghe II edged out Herreweghe I, Suzuki deserbes all the praise he gets, I have a definite soft spot for Brüggen ...

It could very well write the same thing about the MBM (BWV 232), depending on circumstances I may resonate more to a particular conductor and this is having noticed prefering period-instruments and yet enjoying the contrast with way older recordings as in Mengelberg for the SMP (BWV 244) and Enescu for the MBM (BWV 232).

Herreweghe, Brüggen any better ? I could'nt say ... I would try to take a listen for I consider them very good !

 

What is the last vocal work of J.S. Bach you have listened to?

Aryeh Oron wrote (November 1, 2004):
The last long discussion in the BCML was dedicated to the education of J.S. and his sons.

It seems that everyone has forgotten that we have planned to discuss Bach's other (non-cantatas) vocal works during 2004. You can see a list of the works for discussion at the page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Order-2004.htm and a reminder at the right side of Bach Cantatas Website Home Page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/
The weeks of Lukas-Passion BWV 246 and Markus-Passion BWV 247 have passed without mentioning these works by any member. Last week we should have been discussing the 3rd Cantata from Weihnachts-Oratorium BWV 248...

I have managed the cantata discussions in the BCML for more than four years. It is now the turn of other members to carry the torch. If any member is interested in taking upon himself/herself this mission, please contact me either through the BCML or off-list.

I hope, at least, that you are listening to some of Bach's vocal works.

My question is:
"What is the last vocal work of J.S. Bach you have listened to?
It would be nice if you also add short description of your impression of the recording.

Yoël L. Arbeitman wrote (November 1, 2004):
Maura Moreira (Re: What is the last vocal work of J.S. Bach you have listened to?)

Aryeh Oron wrote:
< The weeks of Lukas-Passion BWV 246 and Markus-Passion BWV 247 have passwithout mentioning these works by any member. >
Odd coincidence that you mention Lukas-Passion (BWV 246) as the other day I listened to a favorite disk of mine: it was a disk of the contralto (a real deep contralto) Maura Moreira and I was thinking about the oddity that this Lukas-Passion is the only "Bach" and almost the only anything she recorded. The disk I listened to has Wagner's Wesendonck Lieder, Schumann's Requiem for Mignon, Brahms's Alto Rhapsody, and finally Mahler's Rückert Lieder (on Vox). In my view she is more effective with her deep and gorgeous voice and nuanced phrasing in everything but the Mahler. Nevertheless this Brazilian contralto who has recorded almost nothing else (Zimmermann's Die Soldaten and Pseudo-Bach Lukas-Passion (BWV 246), and supposedly there are some Tristan excerpts as Brangäne, none of which I have heard) leaves a gap.

John Pike wrote (November 1, 2004):
[To Aryeh Oron] I have been working my way through Bach's sacred cantatas over the past year. Most of them I had never heard before joining the list over a year ago now. I then gradually accumulated the complete cycle from Harnoncourt/Leonhardt. I am now just over half way through Vol. 10, the last one. I will then start on the secular cantatas. I am greatly enjoying all the cantatas in this last volume. It seems to me that it contains some of Bach's finest music, and I haven't reached 199 (or 200) yet, which are two of my very favourites. Over the past year, I have also bought multiple recordings of the SMP (BWV 244) and SJP (BWV 245), as recommended by list members. There was not a single disappointing one. I have also been filling in the other gaps in my collection with recordings in the Haenssler series. That cost me well over UKP 200 for about 25 CDs. Last month, I got the whole set for under UKP 100 from jpc.de, so now I can hear all Rilling's performances of the cantatas. Over the past year, I have gained so much from the advice and expertise of people on the list, so a big thank you to so many who have given good advice or brought things to my attention. Despite the problems on the list of which we are all aware, it is well worth sticking with it. My own feeling is that we are very privileged to have people like Brad and Uri giving their valuable time and expertise in what is often a hostile environment.

Bradley Lehman wrote (November 1, 2004):
[To Aryeh Oron] The Magnificat BWV 243, Fasolis' recording, probably to include in a short published collection of reviews of Christmas music. That excellent disc also includes Cantata BWV 21 "Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis" and motet BWV 225 "Singet dem Herrn".

Sw Anandgyan wrote (November 1, 2004):
Aryeh Oron wrote:
< My question is: "What is the last vocal work of J.S. Bach you have listened to? It would be nice if you also add short description of your impression
of the recording. >
My usual pleasure of gleaning second-hand CD shops reignited when I came across one in a different part of my hometown and finally got my hands on the Morrissey ( of The Smiths fame ) 'Vauxhall and I" AND Magdalena Kozena's Bach Arias.

Now on my wish list are the Motets done by Bernius and the ones done by Junghänel ( aren't they reissued in the DHM Splendeurs edition ? ) but this one was available. I'm usually not too keen on an album of excerpts, even if arias, and I do remember the many good things I had read about this recording.

I was extremely pleased with the quality of the playing, The period-instruments Musica Florea is nicely smooth to my beginners'ears and because of the interesting choices of arias, "Erbarme dich, mein Gott", "Zerfliesse, mein Herze, in Fluten der Zähren" and the "Laudamus te" from respectively the SMP (BWV 244), SJP (BWV 245) and the MBM (BWV 232), among others was another golden opportunity to hear this sumptuous voice applied to
some Bach vocal music.

It got me to put on the Katleen Ferrier CD of the arias she sang from the SMP (BWV 244) and MBM (BWV 232) under the govern of Herbert Von Karajan in Vienna 1950 ( Urania label )
...

Oh ! I answered Aryeh's question wrongly. Magdalena 's CD was the next-one-to-last ...

Yeah, my only two CDs of only arias but their acquisition was hard to resist for these have moments of excellency.

Adrian Horsewood wrote (November 1, 2004):
Aryeh Oron wrote:
< My question is: "What is the last vocal work of J.S. Bach you have listened to? It would be nice if you also add short description of your impression
of the recording. >
The last vocal work of JSB that I listened to was Karl Richter's recording of the Advent cantata BWV 61 'Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland', with Mathis, Schreier, and Fischer-Dieskau as the soloists. This is one of the few cantatas that I have actually sung in (the chorus, not as a soloist!), and I particularly like the bass recitative 'Siehe, siehe' - I would love to sing it at some point!.

While I am a great fan of HIP recordings (my other recording of this cantata is John Eliot Gardiner's), I love Richter's broad, expansive approach to this work, especially the opening instrumental passage - in comparison, the JEG recording just seems very lightweight to me.

I am a great fan of all of the soloists on Richter's recording, but I find the two recitatives (tenor and bass) the most interesting (this is only personal, mind!). This may have something to do with the fact that, on a choir tour to Germany, we passed time on long coach journeys by substituting phrases from a 1945 German phrasebook for the real words...
:o)

Anyway, I hope that starts some discussion...!

Bradley Lehman wrote (November 2, 2004):
Adrian Horsewood wrote:
< The last vocal work of JSB that I listened to was Karl Richter's recording of the Advent cantata BWV 61 'Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland',(...) While I am a great fan of HIP recordings (my other recording of this cantata is John Eliot Gardiner's), I love Richter's broad, expansive approach to this work, especially the opening instrumental passage - in comparison, the JEG recording just seems very lightweight to me. >
Well, at least pick up Herreweghe's also, with 61/62/36.

I've been listening this week to Praetorius' concerted setting of that same chorale. First track of this album: http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/details/66200.asp

Santu De Silva wrote (November 2, 2004):
Aryeh Oron wrote:
< My question is: "What is the last vocal work of J.S. Bach you have listened to? It would be nice if you also add short description of your impression
of the recording. >
I recently obtained the B minor Mass (BWV 232) recorded by Scherchen, and this was the last recording I listened to.

It was generally far less satisfactory than the recordings I usually listen to: King Consort, or J.E.Gardiner. I suppose it is of historical value. Too much vibrato in the soprano & alto soloists.

However much I deplore the over-polished perfection of Gardiner's performances, I'm getting so accustomed to it that anything else seems lacking!

Matthew Neugebauer wrote (November 2, 2004):
[To Santu De Silva] Currently traversing the McCreesh SMP (BWV 244) -have mixed feelings about it (as anyone on the Handel-L list would know...) but will reserve my final comments to, well, the end...

David Glenn Lebut Jr. wrote (November 2, 2004):
Aryeh Oron wrote:
< My question is: "What is the last vocal work of J.S. Bach you have listened to? It would be nice if you also add short description of your impression
of the recording. >
This is an easy question to answer. As I am much into Passion music, the answewould be as follows: Max's recording of the Fourth Version of the Johannespassion BWV 245, the Helbich recording of the Lukaspassion BWV 246, the Richter (1979 and 1958) recordings of the Matthäuspassion BWV 244, the Richter recording of the Johannespassion BWV 245, the Rilling (1997) recording of all five versions of the Johannespassion BWV 245, and the Koopman and Goodman recordings of the Markuspassion BWV 247. I am in the process of purchasing the Henning recording of the Matthäuspassion BWV 244b, the Rhem recording of the Lukaspassion BWV 246, and the Brembeck recording of the Weimarer Fassung des Passionspasticcio ueber der Markuspassion von Friedrich Nikolaus Bruhns (Weimar version of the Passionspasticcio on the Keiser/Bruhns Markuspassion). I am also planning to expand to cover all Passiontide works by Bach's sons and friends and contemporaries (I have taped copies of the 1759 Markuspassion and the 1765 Johannespassion by Georg Philipp Telemann as well as his Passionsoratorium "Betrachtung der neunten Stunde der Todestage Jesu) and in general.

Rianto Pardede wrote (November 2, 2004):
Well, the latest vocal work that I have listened to was the recording of St Matthew Passion under the direction of Philippe Herreweghe. However, since I only listened to this only casually and only to a few first movements, I'm afraid I'm not able to say anything particular about it, yet.

But talking about impression, just recently I was very much impressed by a DVD titled "Glorious Bach". This DVD features the performance of -Nun komm der Heiden Heiland-, -Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben- and -Magnificat (BWV 243) -, under the direction of Nikolaus Harnoncourt. I would like to mention the first recitative "Gebenedeiter mund ..." sung by Ian Bostridge, in -Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben-.

For a long time, of a few JS Bach's recordings I own, it's the chorales and the choruses that always draw my attention. At my loss, I've never been attracted that much to the recitatives. Not until I saw and listened to "Gebenedeiter mund ..." in this particular DVD. From the first time, I was so captivated by the music. The pace, the dissonance, the built up of a drama, the intensity and the climax, and everything is such that I was forced to be wholly attentive to this single recitative. Powerful interpretation! It was a kind of turning point, really. Now, I can listen to any recitative any time.

Jimmy Setiawan ]Jakarta, Indonesia] wrote (November 4, 2004):
[To David Glenn Lebut Jr.] I just listened to Missa Brevis (forget the BWV), performed by Purcell Quartet. OVPP. The soprano is a bit darker to my ear, I prefer the bright one like Sally McNair. But I love it though.

Also I listened to Trio Sonatas in arrangement for violine, guitar and harpsichord (Pacifica Musica?). Actually, I so much want to collect trio sonatas in different arrangement. I have 3 cd: besides the one already mentioned, I also have arrangement for solo harpsichord and trio guitar.Could any one of you tell me the others?

 

Rating Cantatas

Aryeh Oron wrote (December 10, 2004):
Eric Bergerud wrote:
"I'd really like to see a top ten or top twenty cantata list from all interested members. I think the results would be interesting (although I suppose some poor soul would have to tabulate it). But it would be fun to see a work one is not very familiar with recommended and try it out. Personally I use Simon Crouch's list for this very reason pretty often. I think the list members could do just as well. Just a thought."
I have to admit that I do not like the concept of rating cantatas. In the previous cycle of cantata discussions (1999-2003), when every week I was listening couple of time to every recording of the cantata under discussion at my disposal, taught me that every cantata has its own merits. Every cantata deserves investigation and repeated listening, and every cantata is a small world in itself. However, I am aware that other members might have different view regarding cantata rating.

As a warm-up to the upcoming second round of cantata discussions, I suggest to build a rating system based on the combined taste of the BCML members.

Each member will suggest:
Up to 5 cantatas in level A (5 points)
Up to 5 cantatas in level B (4 points)
Up to 5 cantatas in level C (3 points)
Up to 5 cantatas in level D (2 points)
Up to 5 cantatas in level E (1 point)

When we have enough voters, I shall do the calculation and present the combined rating system at the Bach Cantatas Website.

Before sending your personal rating, please say if you accept my proposal or propose another formula.

John Pike wrote (December 10, 2004):
Aryeh Oron wrote:
< I have to admit that I do not like the concept of rating cantatas. In the previous cycle of cantata discussions (1999-2003), when every week I was listening couple of time to every recording of the cantata under discussion at my disposal, taught me that every cantata has its own merits. Every cantata deserves investigation and repeated listening, and every cantata is a small world in itself. ?
I agree with these comments. I am not in favour of ratings and on the few occasions that I looked at Simon Crouch's comments/ratings, I did not agree with them. For what it's worth, here is a list of some of my favourite cantatas from the top of my head. I am aware that there will be many missing.

BWV 11, BWV 21, BWV 51, BWV 68, BWV 78, BWV 82, BWV 95, BWV 106, BWV 115, (motet BWV 118), BWV 133, BWV 137, BWV 140, BWV 147, BWV 156, BWV 158, BWV 170, BWV 188, BWV 198, BWV 199, BWV 200, BWV 208, BWV 211, BWV 212, BWV 249

 

Continue on Part 9: Year 2005-1

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Last update: ýMarch 13, 2012 ý09:04:19