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Musical Context of Bach Cantatas
Motets & Chorales for 10th Sunday after Trinity

 

Readings: Epistle: 1 Corinthians 12: 1-11; Gospel: Luke 19: 41-48

Dates in the lifetime of J.S. Bach, including works composed for the event

Motets and Chorales for the 10th Sunday after Trinity (Trinity 10)

Douglas Cowling wrote (October 24, 2011):
THE MUSICAL CONTEXT OF BACH'S CANTATAS:
MOTETS AND CHORALES FOR THE TENTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY

Sources:

* BACH'S HYMN BOOK:
Jürgen Grimm, "Das neu [?] Leipziger Gesangbuch des Gottfried Vopelius
(Leipzig 1682)",
Berlin: Merseburger, 1969.
ML 3168 G75

* BACH'S MOTET COLLECTION:
Otto Riemer, "Erhard Bodenschatz und sein Florilegium Portense"
Schünigen: Kaminsky,1927
ML 410 B67R4

Partial Index of Motets in ³Florilegium Portense² with links to online scores and biographies:
http://www3.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Florilegium_Portense

Dissertation on ³Florilegium Portense² (downloadable):
http://etd.ohiolink.edu/view.cgi/Chaney%20Mark%20A.pdf?osu1180461416

NOTES:

* Unlike Trinity 9 which had no prescribed motets, Trinity 10 has four motets with three settings of text from Psalm 136, ³By the Waters of Babylon².

* The Babylonian motets are related to the Hymn of the Day, based on the same psalm text. The texts may have been chosen to complement the Gospel, Luke 19:41-48, which describes Christ weeping over the future destruction of Jerusalem.

* Biographical information is lacking for Antonio Savetta.

1) MOTETS for Introit, Before Sermon at mass and vespers for Choir II, and During Communion:

i) ³Hymnum Cantate² (8 voices) - Tibutio Massaine (Massaini) (before 1550 ­after 1609)
Biography: http://www.hoasm.org/IVO/Massaini.html
(second half of text, ³Super Flumina²
Text: Psalm 136:3-4:

Sing us one of the songs of Sion.
How shall we sing the Lord's song : in a strange land?

ii) ³In convertendo² (8 voices) ­ Orlando (di Lasso?) (1532-94)
Biography: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Lasso-Orlando.htm
List of Online Scores: http://www2.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Orlando_di_Lasso
Score: http://tinyurl.com/6j6jjoz
Text: Psalm 126:1-6
When the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion, we were like them that dream.
Then was our mouth filled with laughter, and our tongue with singing: then said they among the heathen, The Lord hath done great things for them.
The Lord hath done great things for us; whereof we are glad.
Turn again our captivity, O Lord, as the streams in the south.
They that sow in tears shall reap in joy.
He that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him.


iii) ³Super Flumina Babylonis² (8 voices) ­ Melchior Vulpius

Biography: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Vulpius.htm

List of Online Scores: http://www2.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Melchior_Vulpius

Text: Psalm 136:1-2:

By the waters of Babylon we sat down and wept : when we remembered thee, O Sion.
As for our harps, we hanged them up : upon the trees that are therein.

iv) ³Super Flumina Babylonis² (8 voices) ­ Antonio Savetta (? - ?)

Text: Psalm 136:1-2: [see above]

2) HYMN OF DAY (de tempore)

³An Wasserflüssen Babylon²
Melody & Translation:
http://matthaeusglyptes.blogspot.com/2011/08/wasserflussen-babylon-repost.html
Online Sample:
http://www.amazon.com/An-Wasserfl%C3%BCssen-Babylon/dp/B000UBOM5S

3) CHORALES for Pulpit and Communion Hymns:

³Ach lieben Christen seid getrost²
Text & Translation: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale087-Eng3.htm

Ed Myskowski wrote (October 24, 2011):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< NOTES:
* Unlike Trinity 9 which had no prescribed motets, Trinity 10 has four motets with three settings of text from Psalm 136, By the Waters of Babylon.
* The Babylonian motets are related to the Hymn of the Day, based on the same psalm text. The texts may have been chosen to complement the Gospel, Luke 19:41-48, which describes Christ weeping over the future destruction of Jerusalem. >
This caught my eye in a quick scan, certainly worthy of further consideration.

Ed Myskowski wrote (October 24, 2011):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< Text: Psalm 136:1-2:
By the waters of Babylon we sat down and wept : when we remembered thee, O Sion.
As for our harps, we hanged them up : upon the trees that are therein. >
This is Psalm 137 in my NRV Bible. The sense remains, the renumbering is reason enough to weep further.

Douglas Cowling wrote (October 24, 2011):
Numbering of Psalms

Ed Myskowski wrote:
< This is Psalm 137 in my NRV Bible. The sense remains, the renumbering is reason enough to weep further. >
Catholics and Orthodox follow the Greek numbering of the psalms; Protestants follow the Hebrew numbering.

Table of correspondences: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psalms

The Italian composers of the "Super Flumina" motets used the Catholic numbering.

Ed Myskowski wrote (October 24, 2011):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< Catholics and Orthodox follow the Greek numbering of the psalms; Protestants follow the Hebrew numbering. >
Different strokes for different folks (thanks Will)? My NRV is actually the RSV (Revised Standard Version). I inadvertently added *N* for new. Not much new under the sun.

Humor aside, this is in fact a key reference for the cantata texts?

Michael Cox wrote (October 25, 2011):
[To Ed Myskowski] The ”renumbering” of the Psalms goes back to the early translations of the Bible into Greek and Latin.

Protestant Bible translations follow the Hebrew numbering, as in the Jewish tradition. The Greek Orthodox follow the Septuagint Greek numbering and the Latin Vulgate similarly.

Thus Psalms 42 and 43 are a single psalm, arbitrarily divided into two. There is also a Psalm 151.

The division of the Bible into verses was the work of the French book printer Étienne (Stephanus), a follower of Calvin in the 16th century.

Hope this helps rather than confuses the issue.

David McKay wrote (October 25, 2011):
[To Michael Cox] Also, Hebrew Bbible verse numbering is different from the verse numbering in the English Bible at times.

For example, Tehillim [Psalms] in the Hebrew Bible gives verse numbers to the superscriptions, whereas in the English Bible, the verse numbers begin after the headings.

Ed Myskowski wrote (October 26, 2011):
Michael Cox wrote:
< The ”renumbering” of the Psalms goes back to the early translations of the Bible into Greek and Latin.
[...]
Hope this helps rather than confuses the issue. >
Helpful, indeed. It has been informative for me over the past few years, in trying to understand the sources of Bachs texts, to realize how very early are the splits in Christian doctrine.

Michael Cox wrote (October 26, 2011):
David NcKay wrote:
“Also, Hebrew Bible verse numbering is different from the verse numbering in the English Bible at times.”
This is one example of the early split between Christianity and Judaism - the Church and the Synagogue. The numbering of Tehillim in Hebrew follows Jewish tradition. Christian tradition in the West was Greek-Latin until the Reformation. Catholic church music e.g. Monteverdi and Vivaldi, follows the numbering in the Latin Vulgate, which follows the Greek Septuagint. Protestant Bible translations and music generally follow the Hebrew tradition in the numbering of the Psalms, but the division into verses in () Christian Bibles was a Christian (Calvinist) invention and is not based on Jewish tradition. Handel, for instance, wrote both Catholic-Latin and Protestant-English settings of Psalms; he might appear inconsistent in the numbering, but in reality he only followed the differing traditions.

Moreover, biblical names differ e.g. Elias (from Greek) = Elijah (from Hebrew). This can be very confusing not only for Bible readers but also for musicologists!

Luther knew Hebrew, but I suspect that he didn’t know Aramaic. In the Greek NT Jesus cries out on the cross: “Eli, Eli, lima sabachthani” (= Eli, Eli, lema šəbaqtanî). Luther translated this into Hebrew: “Eli, Eli, lama azabtani”, as is familiar to us from Bach’s St. Matthew Passion. As far as I know, Bach did not know any Hebrew.

I know that Bach’s duties in Leipzig included teaching Latin, until he could find a substitute teacher. Can anyone tell me/us whether he knew any Greek other than Kyrie eleison and Christe eleison? I would be interested to know.

Ed Myskowski wrote (October 28, 2011):
Michael Cox wrote:
< I know that Bach’s duties in Leipzig included teaching Latin, until he could find a substitute teacher. >
Teaching Latin was an obligation of Bachs postition. I believe it is documented that he *passed* an examination which qualified him. Also documented that it was agreed from the beginning that he would not teach Latin, but would pay for someone else to assume the duties.

Not so much a substitute, as that Bach satisfactorily demonstrated his ability to oversee the actual Latin teacher, paid for out of Bachs salary. Not exactly equivalent to saying that Bach was able and/or willing to teach Latin.

Continue of this part of the discussion, see: Bach's Languages [General Topics]

 

Trinity 10 Chorales

William Hoffman wrote (October 13, 2011):
Bach's three extant cantatas for the 10th Sunday after Trinity (BWV 46, BWV 101, and BWV 102) show considerable commonality besides being representative of his three cycles: chorus cantata (1723), chorale chorus cantata (1724) and chorus cantata in two parts (1726). All three works use penitential hymns and are rooted in minor keys to reflect the Gospel, Luke 19: 41-48 Jesus weeps over Jerusalem, as well as tonal allegory.

Chorus Cantata BWV 46

Cantata BWV 46, "Schauet doch und sehet,/ ob irgendein Schmerz sei wie mein Schmerz) (Behold and see if any grief is like my grief) opens with the quoto from Lamentation 1:12].
*Cantata Text & Translation: BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/BWV46-Eng3.htm

Movement No. 6, an elaborated chorale in g-D uses the chorale melody and text: "O großer Gott von Macht" (O God, great in your power), Stanza 9, <O großer Gott von Treu" (Oh God great in your faithfulness). It is Bach's only extant setting.
*Chorale Text & Translation: BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale024-Eng3.htm.

The text authors are Balthasar Schnurr (1632) & Johann Matthäus Meyfart (verse 9, 1633; Song of Penance). The chorale melody: "O großer Gott von Macht" | Composer: Balthasar Schnurr (1632)
*Chorale source information: BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/O-Grosser-Gott.htm

The choralr is found in <Das Neu Leipziger Gesangbuch> (NLGB) 1682, No. 783 (<omnes tempore> Psalm-influenced hymn, undesignated service).

"O großer Gott von Macht" "was the hymn of the day for this Sunday in Weißenfels," says Günther Stiller in <JSB and Liturgical Life in Leipzig> (Concordia, St. Louis MO, 1984: 243). "The Dresden hymn schedules for this day [10th Sunday after Trinity] prescribe in addition to specific hymns, the general direction `Hymns concerning Repentance.' Bach chose such repentance hymns for the two other cantatas for this Sunday (BWV 101 and BWV 102).


Chorale Chorus Cantata BWV 101

"The basic text of [Chorale] Cantata BWV 101 is a hymn specifically listed in the Leipzig and Dresden hymn schedules," says Stiller, "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott/ Die schwere Straf und große Not (Take from us, you faithful God,/ the heavy punishment and great distress). Author: Martin Moller (1584).
It is the first alternate text set to the anonymous/Luther text, "Vater unser im Himmelreich" (Our Father in the Heavenly Kingdom, better known as the Lord's Prayer).

Movement No. 7, plain chorale (d minor): "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott" (Take from us, you faithful God):
Stanza 7, "Leit uns mit deiner rechten Hand" (Guide us with your right hand)
Chorale Text & Translation: BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale050-Eng3.htm
Chorale source information: BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/Vater-unser-im-Himmelreich.htm

Chorale "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott" is found in the NLGB, No. 822, undesignated service.


Two-Part Chorus Cantata BWV 102

Cantata BWV 102, "Herr, deine Augen sehen nach dem Glauben!" (Lord, your eyes look for faith!)
*Cantata Text & Translation: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/BWV102-Eng3.htm

Movement No. 7, plain chorale (in c minor), melody "Vater unser im Himmelreich" | Composer: Anon/Martin Luther
Text No. 3 Author: Johann Heermann (1630), "So wahr ich lebe, spricht dein Gott:/ mir ist nicht lieb des Sünders Tod" (As truly as I live, says your God:/ I take no pleasure in the death of a sinner):
Stanza 6: "Heut lebst du, heut bekehre dich" (Today you live, today be converted),
Stanza 7: "Hilf, o Herr Jesu, hilf du mir" (Help, oh Lord Jesus, help me)
Chorale Text & Translation: BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale051-Eng3.htm
Chorale source information: BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/Vater-unser-im-Himmelreich.htm

Luther's Lord's Prayer

The chorale "Vater unser im Himmelreich" is found in the NLGB, No. 505 (Catechism Hymn, the Lord's Prayer [Luke 11: 2-4].

Luther's German text and Catherine Winkworth's English translation of the nine verses of the Lord Prayer are found at the C. S. Terry Luther Chorales on line:
http://oll.libertyfund.org/?option=com_staticxt&staticfile=show.php%3Ftitle=754&chapter=87939&layout=html&Itemid=27

William Hoffman wrote (July 13, 2011): Cantata 93: Trinity +5 chorales, Texts, Themes
BCW Cantata 93 Discussion 4: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV93-D4.htm

While the Neumark hymn is not assigned to any Sunday in the 1682 <Neu Leipziger Gesangbuch> (NLGB), it was designated for the 5th Sunday after Trinity "in the Leipzig and Dresden hymn schedules of the day, as well as in Weißenfels was assigned to this Sunday," says Günter Stiller in <JSB and Liturgical Life in Leipzig>: 242. The NLGB listing of chorales appropriate for this Sunday has the early Trinity Time featured chorale, "Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ> (I call to Thee, Lord Jesus Christ, NLGB 627), and introduces

1. Another Catechism chois Luther's "Vater unser im Himmelreich" (NLGB 505, The Lords Prayer -- Our Father in the heavenly kingdom),

2. Two other Psalm chorales:
A. Luther's setting of Psalm 124, "Wär Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit" (If God were not with us at this time, NLGB 696), and
B. Johann Kolrose three-verse setting of Psalm 134 "Wo Gott zum Haus nicht gibt sein Gunst" (Where God to the house gives not his goodwill. NLGB 701).

Martin Luther's 1539 poetic setting of the Lord's Prayer (Luke 11:2-4) has nine six-line stanzas: introduction, the seven petitions, and the closing Amen. It is probably based upon a Middle Ages secular melody published for the first time by Valentine Schumann in 1539. In the 1682 NLGB "Vater unser im Himmelreich" is appropriate for the following Sundays: Epiphany +3, Septuagesima, Lent 1, Easter +6, and Trinity +7, 11, and 22. Like the Neumark hymn, "Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten," the Schumann melody has two succeeding <omne tempore >text settings, Martin Moller's 1584 "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott" (Take from us, you faithful God) and Johann Heermann's 1630 "So wahr ich lebe, spricht dein Gott" (As truly as I live, says your God)

Bach set the Schumann melody in the four-part chorale, BWV 416 (Trust in God, Hänssler Complete Bach Edition, v. 85), as well as organ chorale preludes BWV 636 (Baptism, <Orgelbüchlein>), BWV 682 (Catechism, <Clavierübung>) and BWV 737 (miscellaneous chorales). Bach has two variant settings of the plain chorale to Luther's Verse 4 (Thy will be done), the earlier version of the chorale in the St. John Passion (SJP No. 5), now listed as BWV 416, and the c.1740 SJP version, both in D Minor.

The best source on the history of "Vater unser im Himmelreich" is BCW Chorale Melody: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/Vater-unser-im-Himmelreich.htm. The Moller seven-sanza text setting, "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott," is founding the Chorale Cantata BWV 101 for the 10th Sunday after Trinity in 1724 as well as the closing chorale (stanza 7) in Cantata 90 for the 25th Sunday after Trinity 1723. Verses 6 and 7 of Heerman's seven-stanza setting of <So wahr ich lebe, spricht dein Got> is found in the closing chorale of Cantata BWV 102, for the 10th Sunday after Trinity 1726.


Other Chorales for Trinity 10

In Picander's published 1728 church cantata cycle, the text designated for the 10th Sunday after Trinity is P-53, "Laßt meine Tränen euch bewegen" (Let my tears move you), closes with the <omnes tempore> plain chorale, "O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort" (O eternity, thou thunder-word), Stanza 13, "Wach auf, o Mensch, vom Sündenschlaf" (Wake up, o man, from the sleep of sin), text found also closing Cantata BWV 20 for the 1st Sunday after Trinity, and in the St. Mark Passion, BWV 247/11(30), at Christ's suffering in the Garden of Gethsemane. See BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity1.htm , Musical Context. . .Chorales for 1st Sunday after Trinity, Trinity Time, Cycle 2 (1724).


<The New Leipzig Song Book> (NLGB) of 1682 lists two <omnes tempore> hymns for the 10th Sunday after Trinity: "An Wasserflüssen Babylon" and "Ach lieben Christen seid getrost"


Chorale `An Wasserflüssen Babylon'

*Hymn of the Day, NLGB No. 706, "An Wasserflüssen Babylon" (On Babylon's flowing waters), a non-liturgical setting of Psalm 137 (<Super flumina>, A Lament of Israelites in Exile). Of the original Wolfgang Dachstein 1526 five-verse translation of the vesper Psalm 137, Bach used only Dachstein's melody that Paul Gerhardt in 1653 set to his popular ten-verse Passion text, "Ein Lämlein geht und trägt die Schuld" (A lambkind goes and bears our guilt). An English translation of Dachstein's "An Wasserflüssen Babylon" is found in the On-Line Liberty Library of C. S. Terry's <Bach's Chorales>:

Original German Text: Wikipedia: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/An_Wasserflüssen_Babylon

1. An Wasserflüssen Babylon,
Da sassen wir mit Schmerzen;
Als wir gedachten an Sion,
Da weinten wir von Herzen;
Wir hingen auf mit schwerem Mut
Die Orgeln und die Harfen gut
An ihre Bäum der Weiden,
Die drinnen sind in ihrem Land,
Da mussten wir viel Schmach und Schand
Täglich von ihnen leiden.

2. Die uns gefangen hielten lang
So hart an selben Orten
Begehrten von uns ein Gesang
Mit gar spöttlichen Worten
Und suchten in der Traurigkeit
Ein fröhlichn Gsang in unserm Leid
Ach lieber tut uns singen
Ein Lobgesang, ein Liedlein schon
Von den Gedichten aus Zion,
Das fröhlich tut erklingen.

3. Wie sollen wir in solchem Zwang
Und Elend, jetzt vorhanden,
Dem Herren singen ein Gesang
Sogar in fremden Landen ?
Jerusalem, vergiss ich dein,
So wolle Gott, der G'rechte, mein
Vergessen in meim Leben,
Wenn ich nicht dein bleib eingedenk
Mein Zunge sich oben ane häng
Und bleib am Rachen kleben.

4. Ja, wenn ich nicht mit ganzem Fleiss,
Jerusalem, dich ehre,
Im Anfang meiner Freude Preis
Von jetzt und immermehre,
Gedenk der Kinder Edom sehr,
Am Tag Jerusalem, o Herr,
Die in der Bosheit sprechen:
Reiss ab, reiss ab zu aller Stund,
Vertilg sie gar bis auf den Grund,
Den Boden wolln wir brechen!

5. Die schnöde Tochter Babylon,
Zerbrochen und zerstöret,
Wohl dem, der wird dir gebn den Lohn
Und dir, das wiederkehret,
Dein Übermut und Schalkheit gross,
Und misst dir auch mit solchem Mass,
Wie du uns hast gemessen;
Wohl dem, der deine Kinder klein
Erfasst und schlägt sie an ein Stein,
Damit dein wird vergessen![3]

English Translation:

i. At the ryvers of Babilon,
There sat we downe ryght hevely;
Even whan we thought upon Sion,
We wepte together sorofully.
For we were in soch hevynes,
That we forgat al our merynes,
And lefte of all oure sporte and playe:
On the willye trees that were thereby
We hanged up oure harpes truly,
And morned sore both nyght and daye.

ii. They that toke us so cruelly,
And led us bounde into pryson,
Requyred of us some melody,
With wordes full of derision.
When we had hanged oure harpes alwaye,
This cruell folke to us coulde saye:
Now let us heare some mery songe,
Synge us a songe of some swete toyne,
As ye were wont to synge at Sion,
Where ye have lerned to synge so longe.

iii. To whome we answered soberly:
Beholde now are we in youre honde:
How shulde we under captivite
Synge to the Lorde in a straunge londe?
Hierusalem, I say to the,
Yf I remember the not truly,
My honde playe on the harpe no more:
Yf I thynke not on the alwaye,
Let my tonge cleve to my mouth for aye,
And let me loose my speache therfore.

iv. Yee, above all myrth and pastaunce,
Hierusalem, I preferre the.
Lorde, call to thy remembraunce
The sonnes of Edom ryght strately,
In the daye of the destruction,
Which at Hierusalem was done;
For they sayd in theyr cruelnes,
Downe with it, downe with it, destroye it all;
Downe with it soone, that it may fall,
Laye it to the grounde all that there is.

v. O thou cite of Babilon,
Thou thy selfe shalt be destroyed.
Truly blessed shall be that man
Which, even as thou hast deserved,
Shall rewarde the with soch kyndnesse
As thou hast shewed to us gyltlesse,
Which never had offended the.
Blessed shall he be that for the nones1
Shall throwe thy chyldren agaynst the stones,
To brynge the out of memorie.

Wolfgang Dachstein (d. c. 1561) Tr. Bishop Myles Coverdale2 .
http://oll.libertyfund.org/?option=com_staticxt&staticfile=show.php%3Ftitle=2057&chapter=197558&layout=html&Itemid=27

Bach harmonized the "An Wasserflüssen Babylon" melody as a plain chorale in G Major, BWV 268, and set it as a bar-form ritornello organ chorale prelude in F Major in the "Great 18 (Leipzig) Organ Chorales," BWV 653(a). Both are found in the Hänssler Complete Bach Edition, Volume 82, as a psalm chorale. The Dachsmelody also is listed in the Orgelbüchlein, No. 101, under "Christian Life and Conduct," but not set by Bach.

The popular Gerhardt setting of Stanza 1, is found in at least six Passion settings (the first two performed by Bach):

1. Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel's Passion Oratorio, "Ein Lämmlein geht und trägt die Schuld," performed by J.S. Bach at Leipzig Thomas Church on Good Friday, April 23, 1734 (text only);

2. Carl Heinrich Graun's c.1730 Brunswick Passiontide Cantata, "Ein Lämlein geht und trägt die Schuld," in a Passions-Pasticcio probably was performed by Bach in Leipzig, 1743-48, with additional music of Telemann, Kuhnau, Altnikol, and two Bach movements: Chorale Cantata 127/1, chorus, and bass arioso, "So heb ich denn mein Auge sehnlich auf" (I lift my longing eye to Heav'n above), BWV 1088, a "parody" of the tenor arioso, "O Schmerz" (Ah woe!), BWV 244/19(25), from the <St. Matthew Passion> [BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV1088.htm ;]

3. Johann Friedrich Fasch's <Brockes-Passion>, FWV F:1, 1723, in Zerbst, the plain chorale setting opening Part 2 [recording: http://www.amazon.com/Fasch-Passio-Christi-Johann-Friedrich/dp/B000ZJVI5M

4. Telemann's 1723 annual Hamburg Oratorio Passion, <Markus-Passion>, TVWV 5.8, opening with the chorus, "Ein Lämmlein geht und trägt die Schuld" (music survives);

5. Christoph Graupner's 1724 Quinquagesima Estomihi Cantata GWV 119/24, "Ein Lämmlein geht und trägt die Schuld," in G Major for SATB, chorus, strings and basso continuo (J.C. Lichtenberg text); and

6. Telemann's 1745 annual Hamburg Oratorio Passion, <Johnnes Passion>, TVWV 5.30, opening with the chorus, "Ein Lämmlein geht und trägt die Schuld." [Recording: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Telemann-Johannes-Passion-Brugensis-Collegium-Instrumentale/dp/B0000267JD ]


Chorale "Ach lieben Christen seid getrost"

*Communion Hymn, NLGB No. 843, "Ach lieben Christen seid getrost" (Ah dear Christians, be comforted). Authors: David Spaiser (Verse 1, 1521) and Johann Gigas (Verses 2-6, 1561)
Chorale Melody: Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns hält | Composer: Anon (1529). Bach set the melody and text to Chorale Cantata BWV 114 for the 17th Sunday after Trinity 1725, as well as a harmonized plain chorale, BWV 256, in A minor-Major that may have been intended for the Christmas Festival 2 (Dec. 6, 1728), based on the Picander published 1728 text, P-6, Kehret wieder, kommt, zurücke; Stanza 5, "Dein' Seel' bedenk', bewahr dein'n Leib" (Consider your soul, preserve your body).
BCW Text & Translation: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale087-Eng3.htm


Tonal Allegory in Cantatas BWV 46 and BWV 102

Chafe's Tonal Allegory in Cantata BWV 46 is summarized in Cantata BWV 46, Discussions, Part 2: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV46-D2.htm, Peter Smaill wrote (September 4, 2005).

Chafe also discusses Tonal Allegory in Cantata BWV 102 (<Tonal Allegory in the Musc of JSB, 1991: p. 208f) which will be summarized in two weeks in the Cantata BWV 102 Discussion.

 

Cantata 101: Part 2, Chorale Topics

William Hoffman wrote (August 6, 2014):
1st part of this message, see: Cantata BWV 101 - Daiscusions Part 4

Chorale Topics & Usages

The genesis of Martin Moller’s 1684 hymn text is described in detail in Francis Browne’s “Notes on the text,” BCW
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/BWV101-Eng3.htm. <<BWV 101 was written for the 10th Sunday after Trinity and .first performed on 13th August 1724 . It is a chorale cantata from Bach’s second cycle of Leipzig cantatas. As is usual in these cantatas the first and last stanzas of the chorale are used without alteration. In the recitatives in movements 3 and 5 the texts of the chorale are also included unaltered but are expanded by comments. Stanzas 2, 4 and 6 are each paraphrased to form an aria.

The text of the chorale used by Bach’s librettist in BWV 101 has a complicated origin. The unknown author of Bach’s text based his libretto on a hymn by Martin Moller written in 1584 in a time of pestilence. Moller in turn based his hymn on Aufer immensam,deus, aufer iram a Latin poem in sapphic stanzas published in Wittenberg in 1541, possibly written by Georg Klee or Johann Spangenberg. This text was set by Heinrich Schütz. (SWV 337, Op.9/32) This poem is in its turn apparently a reworking of a Late medieval Latin prose prayer, but I have not found that text.

The neo-latin poem is skilfully written and besides Moller’s version there are other German translations from the sixteenth century. I have translated the Latin poem and Moller’s hymn so that it is possible to see the successive adaptation of the text.
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale050-Eng3.htm

The German is a free adaptation, almost a paraphrase , rather than a literal translation. In Leipzig Moller’s chorale was the primary hymn assigned to the 10th Sunday after Trinity . In the gospel for the day Jesus foretells the destruction of Jerusalem. At Vespers on this Sunday in Leipzig Josephus’ account of the fall of Jerusalem in AD70 was read. It was inevitable that Bach anonymous librettist should use this chorale and that Bach’s setting should strike such a sombre tone. Moller in 1584 was writing in a time of pestilence but in the opening stanza includes other misfortunes besides 'Seuchen' (plagues ) so that the hymn was listed in hymn books under the heading “In allgemeiner Not”. This general distress of the people is seen as deserved because of their sins. The second stanza develops this notion of sin, acknowledging the people's guilt but asking God not to judge strictly according to our deserts but according to his mercy. In his adaptation of the second stanza Bach's librettist in general strives for greater elaboration: the aabbcc rhyme scheme is replace with aabcbc, bösen Knecht is changed to Sündenknecht, Herr to Höchster, unserer Tun to sündlich Tun. Imagery of 'das Schwert der Feinde' and the mention of Jerusalem make more explicit connection with the day's readings.

In the recitatives of the third and fifth movement the cantata text quotes one or two lines of the chorale – easily distinguishable by the use of the chorale tune in the accompaniment – and comments or expands on them, generally striving to make the words of the hymn more immediate and particular in application for those present eg when the chorale mentions “ Der Teufel plagt uns” the cantata text uses scriptural references to reinforce the danger posed by the devil. Like the second movement aria the arias in movements 4 and 6 adapt the text of the corresponding stanzas in the chorale. In the dramatic bass aria the chorale's emphasis on human weakness is replaced by concentration on God's response to man's sinfulness : present experience of his anger and hope for his paternal forgiveness. In the aria for soprano and alto the chorale stanza is lengthened by the repetition of the opening line and the appeal made to God is given more immediacy by the replacement of the abstract mention of Baumherzigkeit with the striking phrase , Baumherziger Gott, Baumherzigkeit and the personal reference of the additional line :Ich seufze stets in meiner Not. The cantata text has developed from the generalising collective wir to the particularity of ich

As is customary the last stanza is used unaltered and sung by the choir. It seems A fitting closure to conclude with both a general appeal once more for “ Stadt und Land” and a more personal plea for help ithe distress each must face alone, the hour of death. Whatever its origins and literary merit, this text serves Bach as the basis for sombre, subtle music. Although BWV 101 may not have the immediate appeal of more popular cantatas, it repays attentive listening and close study.>> The use of Psalm motets in the main services for 10 Sunday after Trinity are found in the “Musical Context: Motets & Chorales for 10th Sunday after Trinity,” http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity10.htm (Douglas Cowling wrote (October 24, 2011).5 “NOTES: Unlike Trinity 9 which had no prescribed motets, Trinity 10 has four motets with three settings of text from Psalm 137, “By the Waters of Babylon” [Super flumina, and one of Psalm 126, “When the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion.” In addition, The Main Service Introit Psalm for the 10th Sunday after Trinity is Psalm 5, Verba mea airbus (Give ear to my words, O Lord (KJV), Psalm of David to Chief Musician upon Nehiloth; see Psalm 5 full text, https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm+5&version=KJV. * The Babylonian motets are related to the Trinity 10 Hymn of the Day, “An Wasserflüssen Babylon,” based on the same psalm text. The texts may have been chosen to complement the Gospel, Luke 19:41-48, which describes Christ weeping over the future destruction of Jerusalem. * Biographical information is lacking for Antonio Savetta.

1) MOTETS for Introit, Before Sermon at mass and vespers for Choir II, and During Communion:
i) “Hymnum Cantate” (8 voices) - Tibutio Massaine (Massaini) (before 1550 ­after 1609) Biography:
http://www.hoasm.org/IVO/Massaini.htm
(second half of text, “Super Flumina” Text: Psalm 136:3-4: Sing us one of the songs of Sion. How shall we sing the Lord's song: in a strange land?
*ii) “In convertendo” (8 voices) ­ Orlando (di Lasso?) (1532-94) Biography:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Lasso-Orlando.htm List of Online Scores: http://www2.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Orlando_di_Lasso. Score: http://tinyurl.com/6j6jjoz; Text: Psalm 126:1-6: When the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion, we were like them that dream. Then was our mouth filled with laughter, and our tongue with singing: then said they among the heathen, The Lord hath done great things for them. The Lord hath done great things for us; whereof we are glad. Turn again our captivity, O Lord, as the streams in the south. They that sow in tears shall reap in joy. He that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him.
*iii) “Super Flumina Babylonis” (8 voices) ­ Melchior Vulpius; Biography:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Vulpius.htm; List of Online Scores: http://www2.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Melchior_Vulpius
Text: Psalm 137:1-2: By the waters of Babylon we sat down and wept : when we remembered thee, O Sion. As for our harps, we hanged them up : upon the trees that are therein.
*iv) “Super Flumina Babylonis” (8 voices) ­ Antonio Savetta (? - ?) Text: Psalm 137:1-2: [see above]
The New Leipzig Song Book (NLGB) of 1682 lists two omnes tempore hymns for the 10th Sunday after Trinity: "An Wasserflüssen Babylon" (Hymn of the Day) and "Ach lieben Christen seid getrost" (Pulpit/Communion Hymn). 2) HYMN OF DAY (de tempore) “An Wasserflüssen Babylon” Melody & Translation:
http://matthaeusglyptes.blogspot.com/2011/08/wasserflussen-babylon-repost.htm; Online Sample:
Amazon.com.
3) CHORALES for Pulpit and Communion Hymns: “Ach lieben Christen seid getrost,” Text& Translation:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale087-Eng3.htm

Trinity 10 Chorales William Hoffman wrote (October 13, 2011):
Bach's three extant cantatas for the 10th Sunday after Trinity (BWV 46, BWV 101, and BWV 102) show considerable commonality besides being representative of his three cycles: chorus cantata (1723), chorale chorus cantata (1724) and chorus cantata in two parts (1726). All three works use penitential hymns and are rooted in minor keys to reflect the Gospel, Luke 19: 41-48 Jesus weeps over Jerusalem, as well as tonal allegory.

Cantata 101 Chorales & Recordings

"The basic text of [Chorale] Cantata BWV 101 is a hymn specifically listed in the Leipzig and Dresden hymn schedules" “for the greater days of penitence and prayer” at “preaching services,” says Günther Stiller6

known as "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott/ Die schwere Straf und große Not (Take from us, you faithful God,/ the heavy punishment and great distress), Author: Martin Moller (1584). It is the first alternate text set to the anonymous/Luther text, "Vater unser im Himmelreich" (Our Father in the Heavenly Kingdom, better known as the Lord's Prayer).

Cantata 101 closing Movement No. 7 is the plain chorale (d minor): "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott" (Take from us, you faithful God): Stanza 7, "Leit uns mit deiner rechten Hand" (Guide us with your right hand); Chorale Text & Translation: BCW:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale050-Eng3.htm; Chorale source information: BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/Vater-unser-im-Himmelreich.htm.

Chorale "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott" is found in the NLGB, No. 316, “Word of God & Christian Church, for an undesignated service. One new recording has includes Cantata 101 as well as related organ chorales and a motet, Gesulado YouTube recording: Preludium in C - BWV 545; Cantate Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott - BWV 101 (2:45); Orgelkoraal Vater unser im Himmelreich - BWV 682 (30:17); Motet Der Geist hilft unser Schwachheit auf - BWV 226 (38:30); Orgelkoraal Vater unser im Himmelreich - BWV 737 (46:52); and
Fuga in C - BWV 545 (?). Details: Uitvoerenden: Musica Amphion & Gesualdo Consort Amsterdam; Wolfgang Zerer, orgel; Pieter-Jan Belder en Harry van der Kamp, muzikale leiding. Datum: vrijdag 13 september 2013, 19:30; Plaats: Zöblitz, Duitsland; Locatie: Stadtkirche. Youtube (Part 1, 51:47), see:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpbbO4I_TEM BCW Recording details, http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Performers/Belder.htm#C4a.

Aryeh Oron’s BCW updated listing of recordings also has YouTube versions of Cantata 101 performances of Harnoncourt (1978), Rilling (1979), Koopman (1998), and Leusink (2000), see Cantata 101 Details & Discography,
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV101.htm.

Luther's Lord's Prayer

The chorale "Vater unser im Himmelreich" (Dorian mode) is found in the NLGB,7 No. 175 (Catechism Hymn, the Lord's Prayer [Luke 11: 2-4]. Luther's German text and Catherine Winkworth's English translation of the nine verses of the Lord Prayer are found a the C. S. Terry Luther Chorales on line:
http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/754/87921.78

A related uses of Luther’s hymns is found in the recent BCML Discussion (Week of June 29) of Cantata 93 for the 5th Sunday after Trinity (William Hoffman wrote [July 13, 2011]: Cantata 93: Trinity +5 chorales, Texts, Themes, BCW Cantata 93 Discussion 4:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV93-D4.htm): << While the Neumark hymn is not assigned to any Sunday in the 1682 <Neu Leipziger Gesangbuch> (NLGB), it was designated for the 5th Sunday after Trinity "in the Leipzig and Dresden hymn schedules of the day, as well as in Weißenfels was assigned to this Sunday," says Günter Stiller (Ibid: 242). The NLGB listing of chorales appropriate for this Sunday has the early Trinity Time featured chorale, "Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ> (I call to Thee, Lord Jesus Christ, NLGB 627), and introduces Luther’s Lord’s prayer and Psalm 124 and 134 chorales: 1. Another Catechism chorus, Luther's "Vater unser im Himmelreich" (NLGB 175, The Lords Prayer -- Our Father in the heavenly kingdom); and 2. Two other Psalm chorales: A. Luther's setting of Psalm 124, "Wär Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit" (If God were not with us at this time, NLGB 266), and B. Johann Kolrose three-verse setting of Psalm 134 "Wo Gott zum Haus nicht gibt sein Gunst" (Where God to the house gives not his goodwill. NLGB 268) under “Christian Life and Conduct: David Psalms.”

Martin Luther's 1539 poetic setting of the Lord's Prayer (Luke 11:2-4) has nine six-line stanzas: introduction, the seven petitions, and the closing Amen. It is probably based upon a Middle Ages secular melody published for the first time by Valentine Schumann in 1539. In the 1682 NLGB "Vater unser im Himmelreich" is appropriate for the following Sundays: Epiphany +3, Septuagesima, Lent 1, Easter +6, and Trinity +7, 11, and 22. Like the Neumark hymn, "Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten," the Schumann melody has two succeeding omne tempore text settings, Martin Moller's 1584 "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott" (Take from us, you faithful God) and Johann Heermann's 1630 "So wahr ich lebe, spricht dein Gott" (As truly as I live, says your God), not found in the NLGB but see text and Francis Browne English translation, BCW http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale051-Eng3.htm

The best source on the history of "Vater unser im Himmelreich" is BCW Chorale Melody:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/Vater-unser-im-Himmelreich.htm. The Moller seven-sanza text setting, "Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott," is founding the Chorale Cantata BWV 101 for the 10th Sunday after Trinity in 1724 as well as the closing chorale (stanza 7) in Cantata 90 for the 25th Sunday after Trinity 1723. Verses 6 and 7 of Heerman's seven-stanza setting of “So wahr ich lebe, spricht dein Got” is found in the closing chorale of Cantata BWV 102, for the 10th Sunday after Trinity 1726.

Bach set the Schumann melody in the four-part chorale, BWV 416 (Trust in God, Hänssler Complete Bach Edition, v. 85), as well as organ chorale preludes BWV 636 (Baptism, Orgelbüchlein), BWV 682 (Catechism, Clavierübung III) and BWV 737 (miscellaneous chorales). Bach has two variant settings of the plain chorale to Luther's Verse 4 (Thy will be done), the earlier version of the chorale in the St. John Passion (SJP No. 5), now listed as BWV 416, and the c.1740 SJP version, both in D Minor.

Other Chorales for Trinity 10

In Picander's published 1728 church cantata cycle, the text designated for the cantata for the 10th Sunday after Trinity is P-53, "Laßt meine Tränen euch bewegen" (Let my tears move you), closing with the omnes tempore plain chorale, "O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort" (O eternity, thou thunder-word), Stanza 13, "Wach auf, o Mensch, vom Sündenschlaf" (Wake up, o man, from the sleep of sin), text found also closing Cantata BWV 20 for the 1st Sunday after Trinity, and in the St. Mark Passion, BWV 247/11(30), at Christ's suffering in the Garden of Gethsemane. See BCW:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Trinity1.htm, Musical Context . . . Chorales for 1st Sunday after Trinity, Trinity Time, Cycle 2 (172

Chorale `An Wasserflüssen Babylon'

*Hymn of the Day, NLGB No. 271, "An Wasserflüssen Babylon" (On Babylon's flowing waters), a non-liturgical setting of Psalm 137 (, A Lament of Israelites in Exile). Of the original Wolfgang Dachstein 1526 five-verse translation of the vesper Psalm 137, Bach used only Dachstein's melody that Paul Gerhardt in 1653 set to his popular ten-verse Passion text, "Ein Lämmlein geht und trägt die Schuld" (A lambkind goes and bears our guilt) while an English translation of Dachstein's "An Wasserflüssen Babylon" is found in the On-Line Liberty Library of C. S. Terry's Bach's Chorales.

Original German Text (Wikipedia:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/An_Wasserflüssen_Babylon):

1. An Wasserflüssen Babylon, Da sassen wir mit Schmerzen; Als wir gedachten an Sion, Da weinten wir von Herzen; Wir hingen auf mit schwerem Mut Die Orgeln und die Harfen gut An ihre Bäum der Weiden, Die drinnen sind in ihrem Land, Da mussten wir viel Schmach und Schand
Täglich von ihnen leiden.
.2. Die uns gefangen hielten lang
So hart an selben Orten
Begehrten von uns ein Gesang
Mit gar spöttlichen Worten Und suchten in der Traurigkeit Ein fröhlichn Gsang in unserm Leid Ach lieber tut uns singen
Ein Lobgesang, ein Liedlein schon
Von den Gedichten aus Zion,
Das fröhlich tut erklingen.
3. Wie sollen wir in solchem Zwang
Und Elend, jetzt vorhanden,
Dem Herren singen ein Gesang
Sogar in fremden Landen ?
Jerusalem, vergiss ich dein,
So wolle Gott, der G'rechte, mein
Vergessen in meim Leben,
Wenn ich nicht dein bleib eingedenk
Mein Zunge sich oben ane häng Und bleib am Rachen kleben.
4. Ja, wenn ich nicht mit ganzem Fleiss,
Jerusalem, dich ehre,
Im Anfang meiner Freude Preis
Von jetzt und immermehre,
Gedenk der Kinder Edom sehr,
Am Tag Jerusalem, o Herr,
Die in der Bosheit sprechen:
Reiss ab, reiss ab zu aller Stund,
Vertilg sie gar bis auf den Grund,
Den Boden wolln wir brechen!

5. Die schnöde Tochter Babylon, Zerbrochen und zerstöret, Wohl dem, der wird dir gebn den Lohn
Und dir, das wiederkehret,
Dein Übermut und Schalkheit gross, Und misst dir auch mit solchem Mass, Wie du uns hast gemessen; Wohl dem, der deine Kinder klein Erfasst und schlägt sie an ein Stein, Damit dein wird vergessen![3]

English Translation:

i. At the ryvers of Babilon,
There sat we downe ryght hevely;
Even whan we thought upon Sion,
We wepte together sorofully.
For we were in soch hevynes,
That we forgat al our merynes,
And lefte of all oure sporte and playe:
On the willye trees that were thereby
We hanged up oure harpes truly,
And morned sore both nyght and daye.

ii. They that toke us so cruelly,
And led us bounde into pryson,
Requyred of us some melody,
With wordes full of derision.
When we had hanged oure harpes alwaye,
This cruell folke to us coulde saye:
Now let us heare some mery songe,
Synge us a songe of some swete toyne,
As ye were wont to synge at Sion,
Where ye have lerned to synge so longe.

iii. To whome we answered soberly:
Beholde now are we in youre honde:
How shulde we under captivite
Synge to the Lorde in a straunge londe?
Hierusalem, I say to the,
Yf I remember the not truly,
My honde playe on the harpe no more:
Yf I thynke not on the alwaye,
Let my tonge cleve to my mouth for aye,
And let me loose my speache therfore.

iv. Yee, above all myrth and pastaunce,
Hierusalem, I preferre the.
Lorde, call to thy remembraunce
The sonnes of Edom ryght strately,
In the daye of the destruction,
Which at Hierusalem was done;
For they sayd in theyr cruelnes,
Downe with it, downe with it, destroye it all;
Downe with it soone, that it may fall,
Laye it to the grounde all that there is.

v. O thou cite of Babilon,
Thou thy selfe shalt be destroyed.
Truly blessed shall be that man
Which, even as thou hast deserved,
Shall rewarde the with soch kyndnesse
As thou hast shewed to us gyltlesse,
Which never had offended the.
Blessed shall he be that for the nones1
Shall throwe thy chyldren agaynst the stones,
To brynge the out of memorie.9

Bach harmonized the "An Wasserflüssen Babylon" melody as a plain chorale in G Major, BWV 268, and set it as a bar-form ritornello organ chorale prelude in F Majoin the "Great 18 (Leipzig) Organ Chorales," BWV 653(a). Both are found in the Hänssler Complete Bach Edition, Volume 82, as a psalm chorale. The Dachstein melody also is listed in the Orgelbüchlein, No. 101, under "Christian Life and Conduct," but not set by Bach. Chorale "Ach lieben Christen seid getrost" *Communion Hymn, NLGB No. 326, "Ach lieben Christen seid getrost" (Ah dear Christians, be comforted). Authors: David Spaiser (Verse 1, 1521) and Johann Gigas (Verses 2-6, 1561). The NLGB theme “Death & Dying” (Ns. 324-389) is the penultimate one, followed by “Last Days, Resurrection of the Dead, and Eternal Life (Nos. 390-396). The Chorale Melody is “Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns halt,” Composer: Anon (1529). Bach set the melody and text to Chorale Cantata BWV 114 for the 17th Sunday after Trinity 1725, as well as a harmonized plain chorale, BWV 256, in A minor-Major that may have been intended for the Christmas Festival 2 (Dec. 6, 1728), based on the Picander published 1728 text, P-6, Kehret wieder, kommt, zurücke; Stanza 5, "Dein' Seel' bedenk', bewahr dein'n Leib" (Consider your soul, preserve your body).>> BCW Text & Translation:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale087-Eng3.htm

Chorale Categories. The two categories of chorales listed in the Orgelbüchlein (OB, Little Organ Book), and later used in Bach’s vocal works and organ chorale preludes are: Lord’s Prayer (Melody) OB 65. BWV 636 — Vater unser im Himmelreich; BWV 416(PC), BWV 682-3(CU), 737(NC), 760-661 (Georg Böhm), BWV 662(MC); see “Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott” (text), b. God’s Holy Word, OB 120 etc.
[Persecution & Tribulation; b) God’s Holy Word (Word of God & Christian Church, NLGB 305-22)
OB120. “Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern” (NLGB 313, Word of God & Christian Church, Trinity 20); CC BWV 1(Ann.), BWV 436 (PC), 739(MC)*; BWV 763 (MC)
121. “Wie nach einer Wasserquelle” (Riemenschneider 29 et al); BWV 1119(NC)*; Anh. 50(MC)
122. “Erhalt’ uns, Herr, bei deinem Wort”; BWV 1103(NC)*; BWV 126/1,3,6 (CC); BWV 6/6 (PC), BWV deest (EOC #63, BWV Anh. 50 (OC,D) (Zahn 1945)
123. “Lass’ mich dein sein und bleiben” (Riemenschneider 2 et al or Zahn 5427); BWV 742 (MC, mel. “”Herzlich tut, mich verlangen” (BWV 724)* --- “Nimm von uns, Herr, die treuer Gott” (mel. “Vater unser im Himmelreich); CC BWV 101
--- “Keinen hat Gott verlassen”; BWV 247/41=BWV 369(PC)
--- “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme”; CC BWV 140(Tr.27)

GLOSSARY
AMB – Anna Magdalena Buch AS = Alternate setting CP = Chorale Partitas, BWV 765-771 Cü III = Clavierübung III (Mass & Catechism Chorales), BWV 669-689 D = Doubutful work of JSB
KC = Kirnberger Chorales, BWV 690-713
MC = Miscellaneous Chorale Preludes, 714-64, etc.
NC = Neumeister Chorale Collection, BWV 1090-1120
OB = Orgelbüchlein Collection, BWV 599-644 PC = Plain Chorale, BWV 250-438, etc., c.1730 SBCB = Sebastian Bach’s Chorale Buch c.1740
SC = Schubler Chorales, 645-50 1746
SG = Schmelli Gesangbuch 1735
18 = Great 18 (Leipzig) Organ Chorale Collection, BWV 651-668
CH = Communion (& vespers) hymn
GH – Gradual Hymn (between Epistle & Gospel), Hymn de tempore PH = Pulpit Hymn before sermon
CC = Chorale Cantata, (CC) = Chorale Chorus
EC = Elaborated Chorale setting
OC = Organ Chorale
EOC = Emans Organ Chorales = NBA KB IV/10 (2007)
NLGB = Das Neu Leipziger Gesangbuch> 1682 (Gottfried Vopelius)
Z = Johannes Zahn Melody Catalogue

Leipzig Performances: 10th Sunday after Trinity

Bach’s Leipzig performance calendar cantatas for the 10th Sunday after Trinity:

*BWV 46, “Schauet doch und sehet, ob irgendein Schmerz sei, wie mein Schmerz” (Cycle 1, August 1, 1723; reperformance 1727-35).
*BWV 101, “Nimm von uns Herr, du treuer Gott” (Cycle 2, August 13, 1724; reperformance ?Aug. 19, 1732) *On August 5, 1725, Bach may have presented repeat of Cantata BWV 101 possibly opening with plain chorale BWV 101/7 set to Stanza 1 text. *BWV 102 Herr, deine Augen sehen nach dem Glauben! (Cycle 3, August 25, 1726).
*1727-35, reperformance of Cantata 46.

 

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Last update: ýNovember 10, 2014 ý06:57:38