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Chorale Melodies: Sorted by Title | 371 4-Part Chorales sorted by Breitkopf Number | Explanation

Chorale Melodies used in Bach's Vocal Works
Was mein Gott will, das g’scheh allzeit

Melody & Text | Use of the CM by Bach | Use of the CM by other composers

 

Melody & Text: Zahn: 7568 | EKG: 280

Text:

Although the evidence is not completely clear, it would appear that the author of the text was Duke Albrecht of Prussia (1490-1568) and that it first appeared in 1547 at which time it was coupled with the melody which has a different origin. A fourth and final verse was added by an unknown author in Nürnberg in 1555. Duke Albrecht of Prussia was born as Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach in Ansbach, was named the ‘High Master’ of the German Order (of Knights?). During the Reichstag in Nürnberg in 1522/1523, he was persuaded to join the Reformation and proceeded to introduce the Reformation in Prussia which he then transformed into secular duchy. He died of the plague in Tapiau (East Prussia) in 1568.

 

Melody:

The melody was composed by Claudin de Sermisy (circa 1495-1562) who was a famous French composer at home in both secular and sacred music. He even composed two parody masses in which secular themes/melodies, such as this one, were used as the basis for a church mass. The melody first appeared in print in a collection of secular songs for 4 voices entitled “Trente et quatre chansons…” printed by Pierre Attaingnant on January 28, 1528. The soprano part is reproduced here in modern notation:

Here is the text of this secular song with a translation:

Original French Text

English Translation

Il me suffit de tous mes maulx,
Puis-quil mont livre amort,
Jay endure peine et travaulx,
Tant de douleur et desconfort,
Que voules vous que je vous face,
Pour ester en vostre grace;
De douleur mon cueur si est mort,
Sin e voit vostre face.

(Ich habe genug) I’ve had enough of all my troubles/difficulties
Because I am surrendering myself to death (because I am ready to die)
I have endured pain and travail/hardship
And so much suffering and distress,
What is it that you want me to do to make you happy
So that I can find favor with you/be in your good graces/so that you would have a good opinion of me?
My heart would die of pain/sorrow if it did not behold your face.
(I would die from my suffering if I did not get to see you.)

The first appearance and use of this melody in a sacred setting where it provides the melody for a Dutch versification of Psalm 129 is found in “Souterliedekens” published in Antwerp in 1540.

The German text, for which this melody was chosen, is attributed to Duke Albrecht of Prussia who presented it on the occasion of the death of his first wife in 1547.

 

Early Sources of the Melody:

An early representation of the melody is provided by Johann Eccard in a chorale motet based on the text and melody of Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit from 1597:

Another setting from about the same time, a setting that cannot be precisely dated, is by Seth Calvisius:

In a 17th century hymn book, the melody appears as follows:

Comparison of the original French melody with the German chorale, line by line, one above the other:

 

Use of the Chorale Melody by Bach:

Text 1: Was mein Gott will, das g'scheh allzeit | EKG: 280
Author: Markgraf Albrecht von Brandenburg-Ansbach (Verses 1-3; 1547) / Anon (Verse 4; 1555)

Ver

Work

Mvt.

Year

Br

RE

KE

Di

BC

Score

Music Examples

1

BWV 72

Mvt. 6

1726

-

344

-

-

A37:6

PDF

Mvt. 6 (MG) [midi] | Mvt. 6 (Leusink) [ram]

1

BWV 111

Mvt. 1

1725

-

-

-

-

A36:1

-

Mvt. 1 (Leusink) [ram]

4

BWV 111

Mvt. 6

1725

-

345

-

-

A36:6

PDF

Mvt. 6 (MG) [midi] | Mvt. 6 (Leusink) [ram]

1

BWV 144

Mvt. 6

1724

265

343

265

44

A41:6

PDF

Mvt. 6 (MG) [midi] | Mvt. 6 (Leusink) [ram]

1

BWV 244

Mvt. 25

1727?

115

342

115

 

D3:25

PDF

Mvt. 25 (MG) [midi]

 

Text 2: Barmherzger Vater, höchster Gott | EKG:
Author: Paul Gerhardt (1653)

Ver

Work

Mvt.

Year

Br

RE

KE

Di

BC

Score

Music Examples

9

BWV 103

Mvt. 6

1725

120
348

348

120
349

102

A69:61

PDF

Mvt. 6 (YFM) [midi] | Mvt. 6 (MG) [midi] | Mvt. 6 (Leusink) [ram]

BWV 103/6: Dietel 102 Ich hab in Gottes Herz und Sinn; Breitkopf 120 Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit; Breitkopf 348 Ich hab in Gottes Herz und Sinn.

 

Text 3: Ich hab in Gottes Herz und Sinn | EKG:
Author: Paul Gerhardt (1647)

Ver

Work

Mvt.

Year

Br

RE

KE

Di

BC

Score

Music Examples

10

BWV 65

Mvt. 7

1724

41

346

41

-

A27:7

PDF

Mvt. 7 (MG) [midi] | Mvt. 7 (Leusink) [ram]

1

BWV 92

Mvt. 1

1725

-

-

-

-

A42:1

-

Mvt. 1 (Leusink) [ram]

2

BWV 92

Mvt. 2

1725

-

-

-

-

A42:1

-

Mvt. 2 (Leusink) [ram]

5

BWV 92

Mvt. 4

1725

-

-

-

-

A42:1

-

Mvt. 4 (Leusink) [ram]

10

BWV 92

Mvt. 7

1725

-

-

-

-

A42:1

PDF

Mvt. 7 (MG) [midi] | Mvt. 7 (Leusink) [ram]

12

BWV 92

Mvt. 9

1725

-

347

-

-

A42:1

PDF

Mvt. 9 (MG) [midi] | Mvt. 9 (Leusink) [ram]

BWV 65/7: Breitkopf 41 Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit.

 

Use of the Chorale Melody by other composers:

Joachim Magdeburg (c1525-after 1587):
4-part setting of Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit from Christliche und tröstliche Tischgesenge (Erfurt, 1572)

Orlando di Lasso (c1532-1594):
Parody Mass for 4 voices on Il me suffit

Johann Eccard (1553-1611):
Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit, from Chorale Motet for 5 voices found in Geystliche Lieder, auff den Choral oder gemeine Kirchen-Melodey durchaus gerichtet (1597). See: Score

Sethus Calvisius (1556-1615):
Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit, 4-pt. setting. See: Score

Johann Hermann Schein (1586-1630):
Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit, hymn for 4 voices (& continuo), A II/2,55 (1627)

Heinrich Schütz (1585-1672):
Motet Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit, for alto, tenor, 4 instruments & continuo, SWV 392 (Op. 11/24) from the collection Geistliche Chor-Music (1648)

Johann Erasmus Kindermann (1616-1655):
Fuga for organ on Was Mein Gott Will, das G'scheh Allzeit (from Harmonia organica, in tabulaturam germanicam (5 parts) (1645)

Sebastian Knüpfer (1633-1676):
Cantata: Was mein Gott will for 2 Violins, 3 Violas, Bassoon, 2 Cornetti, 3 Tromboni. 2 S, A., 2 T., B. and bc.

Johann Friedrich Meister (1638-1697):
Cantata: Was mein Gott will, das muß geschehen [This is probably not the same chorale, but a different one – with a different melody?]

Johann Pachelbel (1653-1706):
3 Chorale Prelude for organ Was mein gott will, das gescheh' allzeit (I), PWC 488 (T. 66), PWC 489 (T. 67), PWC 489

Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow (1663-1712):
Chorale Prelude for organWas mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit 

Georg Friedrich Kauffmann (1679-1735):
Chorale Prelude for organ Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit

Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767):
Sacred Cantata Was mein Gott will, das gescheh allzeit, for chorus, 2 oboes, strings & continuo, TWV 1:1529 (1719)
2 Chorale Preludes for organ in A major Was mein Gott will, das g'scheh allzeit', TWV 31:35-36, from Telemanns fugirende und veraendernde Choraele (Hamburg, 1735)

Johann Gottfried Walther (1684-1748):
Chorale Prelude for organ Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit

Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (1710-1784):
Chorale Prelude for organ Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit, F. 38/1/5 (BR A97), from 7 Chorale Preludes for Organ

Johann Friedrich Doles, sr.(1715-1797):
Cantata: Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit

Johann Ludwig Krebs (1713-1780):
Chorale Prelude for organ Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit
Chorale Prelude for trumpet & organ Was mein Gott will, das gescheh allzeit

Johann Gottfried Müthel (1728-1788):
Chorale Prelude for organ Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit

Johann Gottlob Töpfer (1791-1870):
Grand Concert-fantasie for organ on Was mein Gott will, das g'escheh' allzeit

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847):
Was mein Gott will, chorale harmonization for chorus (April 1827)
Organ Sonata No. 1 in F minor/F major, Op. 65/1 (Dec 1844)
The addition was contributed by Mary Ann Winden (July 26, 2009)
From
All Music Guide (Author: Blair Johnston):

The Organ Sonata No. 1 is in four movements. Mendelssohn's original blueprint for these four movements was, however, quite a bit different than the one that ultimately went to print -- as a matter of fact, the original first and second movements were cast out of the sonata altogether and replaced with the two we know today (the originals do, however, survive as independent pieces -- the Fugue in F minor and the Chorale in A flat major). The final version, then, opens with an Allegro moderato e serioso in F minor, fully and richly scored in fortissimo homophony at the beginning and continuing along contrapuntal lines of nearly equal strength. The movement is a fascinating one: 40 measures in, Mendelssohn reaches into the tool-kit of traditional organ music and draws out a harmonization of the chorale "Was mein Gott will gescheh' allzeit"; the chorale, played quietly on one manual, has dignity enough to hold its own against the louder and much more assertive commentary that continues on the other manual.

Wilhelm Strade (1817-1902):
Was mein Gott will, das g'scheh' allzeit, for organ

Max Reger (1873-1916):
Chorale Prelude for organ Was mein Gott will, das gscheh allzeit, Op. 135a/27 (September 1914)

Franz Schmidt (1874-1939):
Chorale Prelude for organ Was mein Gott will (Little Choral Preludes No. 2) (1926)

Reinhard Schwarz-Schilling (1904-1985)
Chorale for organ Was mein Gott will, das g'scheh allzeit (1945-1948)

 

Sources: NBA, vols. III/2.1 & 2.2 in particular [Bärenreiter, 1954 to present] and the BWV ("Bach Werke Verzeichnis") [Breitkopf & Härtel, 1998]
The PDF files of the Chorales were contributed by Margaret Greentree J.S. Bach Chorales
Software: Capella 2004 Software, version 5.1.
Prepared by Thomas Braatz & Aryeh Oron (January 2006, July 2009)

Chorales BWV 250-438
Recordings | General Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Chorales in Bach's Vocal Works: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Hidden Chorale Melody Allusions | Passion Chorale
Individual Recordings:
Hilliard - Morimur | Chorales - Matt | Chorales - Rilling | Preludi ai Corali - Quartetto Italiani di Viola Da Gamba
References:
Chorales BWV 250-300 | Chorales BWV 301-350 | Chorales BWV 351-400 | Chorales BWV 401-438
Texts & English Translations of Chorales:
Sorted by Title
Chorale Melodies:
Sorted by Title | 371 4-Part Chorales sorted by Breitkopf Number | Explanation
MIDI files of the Chorales:
Cantatas BWV 1-197 | Other Vocal Works BWV 225-248 | Chorales BWV 250-438
Articles:
The Origin of the Texts of the Chorales [A. Schweitzer] | The Origin of the Melodies of the Chorales [A. Schweitzer] | The Chorale in the Church Service [A. Schweitzer] | Choral / Chorale [C.S. Terry] | The History of the Breitkopf Collection of J. S. Bach’s Four-Part Chorales [T. Braatz] | Chorale Melody Allusions in Bach's Vocal Works [T. Braatz]
Hymnals used by Bach | Abbreviations used for the Chorales | Links to other Sites on the Chorales

Chorale Melodies: Sorted by Title | 371 4-Part Chorales sorted by Breitkopf Number | Explanation

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Last update: ýJuly 29, 2009 ý08:50:19