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Guide to Bach Tour
Kleinzschocher
[V]

Contents

Description | History
J.S. Bach: Connection | Events in Life History | Performance Dates of Vocal Works | Festivals & Cantata Series
Features of Interest | Information & Links
Photos: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Maps

 

Description

Kleinzschocher is a neighborhood in the southwest of Leipzig, and was until 1891 a separate parish in its incorporation.

Population: 9,600 (1992)

History

Kleinzschocher originated in the 11th Century as a Slavic village. The starting point of the settlement here was the hill where now stands Taborkirche (Tabor Church) and has served as a place of worship (so called Tanzberg). In 1287 the place was the first time mentioned as ""pavorum Scochere" (Zschoche Slavonic."Zypergras"). Kleinzschocher initially consisted of a south of the church situated upper village with shepherds and north lying lower village with cottagers and farm goods quarter. The family Hayn was documented in 1350 as the first owner of estate in the place. In 1484 the place in mentioned as Cleyn Tschocher. With the Reformation, the surrounding villages Groß-Miltitz, Schleußig and Plagwitz were parishioners (parish Kleinzschocher). In 1562, 34 families already lived in Kleinzschocher. In 1599 Kleinzschocher got its own school. In 1632 the village was looted and destroyed by Tilly's horsemen; in 1636 and 1680, it suffered from the rampant plague. On August 26, 1703 the village was raged by a huge fire, which was slso destroyed much of the historical records. A heavy burden came on the population from 1706 to 1707, when Kleinzschocher was sentenced for troop meals in the Northern War. The public pillory was abolished in 1731.

In 1742 the manor came into the possession of the Kammerherrn Heinrich von Dieskau. During the transfer of the estate Peasant Cantata, composed by J.S. Bach, was premiered. Two years later, the town consisted of 90 houses, 52 goods, brick, sheep, shepherd's house, rectory, church and school. In 1812 Schloss Kleinzschocher was bought by the merchant David Johann Förster. He the coming years he promoted good gardening, greenhouses and designed the nearby wooden rooster into a public park. In October 1813, the population fled from Kleinzschocher during the Battle of Nations in the Auewald. With 134 inhabited buildings Kleinzschocher was in 1815 the largest village near Leipzig. In 1817 Kleinzschocher housed 300 residents, 23 horses and 260 cows. Until 1834 the population rose to 724. In between Schleußig and Kleinzschocher held fighting the French and Austrian troops, now marked by a double eagle monument inaugurated in 1913. In 1848, the Leipzig publisher Christian Bernhard Tauchnitz, a ne land owner in the viullage, developed the west wing of the Schloss and in in 1865 the entire schloss was substantially rebuilt. Der Allgemeine Turnverein Kleinzschocher (The General Gymnastics Club) was founded in 1849.

The situation of the working population was subjected to a change from 1870: many of the residents employed in bricklaying and carpentry craftsmanship, then worked largely in the textile and metal factories of Plagwitz. In 1877, the important people's hygienist and co-founder of the Dresden Hygiene Museum Arthur Luerssen was born here. In the same year, the windmill, what is on today's Gießerplatz, was demolished and replaced by a new mill made of stone. In 1879 an agency of the German Imperial Post opened in Kleinzschocher. Since, however, had no telegraph, Kleinzschocher needed to be informed by Plagwitz or Großzschocher in an emergency. The Grains Pharmacy was opened in 1886 by Paul Wild, and is still in operation today. Although the pharmacy was rebuilt several times, a part of the original Art Nouveau-establishment of the dispensary is remained. In 1888 Rudolf Sack inaugurated the Kleinzschochernschen Feldern, now at Park Street, an agricultural research station, after 1945 the Volksgut Kleinzschocher was there. Today, a sports field and a school are located on the territory.

On January 1, 1891 there was amalgamated with the city of Leipzig, five years later the neighborhood was connected to the tram network of the LVB. In 1892, the first gymnastics and sports festival was held at the Leipziger Arbeitersports. Additionally, during the same year the cemetery of Kleinzschocher opened. Pastor Godfrey Christian Lohse (1854-1906) led the first funeral. Richard Lucht, built the chapel in the style of the Neo-Romanesque style. Due to the prevailing housing shortage after the annexation of the land began development and more intensive housing (particularly Meyer's house from 1908). From 1902 to 1904, the new Taborkirche (Tabor Church), designed by A. Rossbach, was built. It is the only twin-towered church in Leipzig's city. In 1905 the Alte Dorfkirche (old village church), located in the immediate vicinity of the Taborkirche, was demolished.

On January 1, 1909, the 140-acre estate district Kleinzschocher was also incorporated to Leipzig. From 1910 to 1913 a landscaped park (Robert-Koch-Park) was designed for the industrialist Rudolph Sack. After World War I, the city acquired the estate and sold the related fields. On them emerged in the wake numerous residential buildings. At the beginning of the World War II, a war and forced labor camps was built in Kleinzschocher. The bombs fell next to the to the air raids victims of the 49th School and the Schloss.

In 1992 about 9,600 people lived in Kleinzschocher. In September 1994 it was decided to make Kleinzschocher a redevelopment area. Since then the area is continuously structurally modernized and improved.

Source: German Wikipedia, English translation by Aryeh Oron (December 2009)

 

Bach Connection

J.S. Bach's Peasant Cantata Mer hahn en neue Oberkeet, BWV 212, one of his most popular, original, and cheerful works, is the last of his cantatas that can be dated. The many corrections in the hastily written autograph score, evidently prepared within a very short period, indicate that only in a few cases did J.S. Bach make use of older music. Only Mvt. 20 is unquestionably a parody (it is based on Mvt. 7 of Cantata BWV 201) and the music for Mvt. 14 was probably borrowed from the lost cantata BWV Anh. I 11, Mvt. 9. The other movements are probably all, or nearly all, new compositions.

We should not be misled by the title 'Peasant' Cantata or, as Christian Friedrich Henrici, alias Picander's printed libretto styles it, 'Cantate en burlesque': this is no rustic piece, to be performed by or for peasants. It is rather a homage cantata like many others, performed on August 30, 1742 in honour of one Carl Heinrich von Dieskau. Upon the death of his mother in 1742, Dieskau, who was born of an old noble family, inherited a number of properties, and on August 30 he was paid the customary homage by his subordinates at the village of Kleinzschocher near Leipzig. As superintendent of the collection of taxes in the Leipzig area, Dieskau was the immediate superior of Picander, and it may have been Picander who, seeking Dieskau's favour through his poetic talent, requested J.S. Bach to set the text he had written and to perform the homage cantata.

Source: Alfred Dürr: The Cantatas of J.S. Bach, Revised and translated into English by Richard D.P. Jone (Oxford University Press, 2005), p. 888

Events in Life History of J.S. Bach

Date/Year

Event

Leipz(1741-1750)

Aug 30, 1742

Performance of the Peasants’ Cantata BWV 212 in Kleinzschocher

Performance Dates of J.S. Bach’s Vocal Works

Date

Event

BWV

Title

Remarks

1742 [Leipzig]

 

Aug 30, 1742

Hommage

212

Mer hahn en neue Oberkeet

[Kleinzschocher]

Bach Festivals & Cantata Series: None.

 

Features of Interest

Taborkirche (Tabor Church)

Information & Links

Kleinzschocher (Official Website) [German]
Kleinzschocher [German]
Kleinzschocher (Wikipedia) [German]
Kleinzschocher (Wikimedia) [Photos]
Leipzig Kleinzschocher- Ein Stadtteil von Leipzig [German]

 

Prepared by Aryeh Oron (March 2004 - December 2009)

Guide to Bach Tour: Main Page | Life History of J.S. Bach | Performance Dates of J.S. Bach’s Vocal Works | Maps | Route Suggestions | Bach Organs | Discussions of Bach Tour
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Last update: ýDecember 13, 2009 ý22:37:16