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Cantata BWV 120
Gott, man lobet dich in der Stille
Examples from the Score

Mvt. 2 Chorus

Example 1

Notice that the second instance of "Steigen" in BWV 120 most closely resembles the "Amen" of BWV 232, taking into account, of course, the fact that the latter has two soprano parts instead of one.

 

Example 2

This shows the four/four time of BWV 120 vs. the cut time of BWV 232. The "Et expecto" section of BWV 232 contains 105 measures, while BWV 120 has 86 measures but with the Da capo included it would be 151 measures. But because of the cut time in BWV 232, one measure of BWV 120 equals 2 measures in BWV 232 (a visual inspection of this file will confirm this). So now you have BWV 120 = 282 measures and BWV 232 remains at 105, quite a difference!

 

Example 3

Here we see two separate versions of the Jauchzet motif in BWV 120 and the application of the first instance in BWV 232 on the word 'resurrectionem'. Notice that the second instance of "Jauchzet" in BWV 120 has an exciting octave jump in the tenor voice right after announcing the first fugal entrance of the theme. The other voices follow with large intervals as well. This version, as exciting and 'jumpy' as it is, does not make it into BWV 232.

 

Example 4

Another unique fugal section in BWV 120 that did not make it into BWV 232. It illustrates how closely the words and the music are connected. With the word "erhebet" directly on top of the uplifting fugal motif, it seems to prove that this could be the original form of the composition.

 

Sources for these snippets - NBA I/32.2 and II/1
Contributed by Thomas Braatz (March 7, 2001)

Cantatas BWV 120, BWV 120a & BWV 120b: Complete Recordings of BWV 120 | Recordings of Individual Movements from BWV 120 | Complete Recordings of BWV 120a | Recordings of Individual Movements from BWV 120a | Details of BWV 120b | Discussions

Scores: Main Page | Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Other Vocal BWV 225-249 | Chorales BWV 250-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-524 | Other Vocal BWV 1081-1127, BWV Anh | Instrumental | Chorale Melodies | Sources
Discussions: Scores of Bach Cantatas: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Bach’s Manuscripts: | Part 1 | Part 2 | Scoring of Bach's Vocal Works
Scoring Tables of Bach Cantatas: Sorted by BWV Number | Sorted by Voice | Abbreviations | Search Works/Movements

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Last update: ýFebruary 20, 2008 ý11:09:14