Recordings/Discussions
Background Information
Performer Bios

Poet/Composer Bios

Additional Information

References: Main Page | Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Other Vocal BWV 225-249 | Chorales BWV 250-300 | Chorales BWV 301-350 | Chorales BWV 351-400 | Chorales BWV 401-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-524 | Vocal Works BWV Anh | BGA | NBA | BC: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | Sources
Discussions of BWV Numbering System: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Cantata BWV 27
Wer weiß, wie nahe mir mein Ende?
Provenance

Thomas Braatz wrote (September 20, 2002):
BWV 27 - Provenance:

The Autograph Score:

The autograph score is in the BB (Staatsbibliothek Berlin, Preußischer Kulturbesitz.)

After Bach’s death the score came into C.P.E. Bach’s possession, where it was recorded as existing in his (CPE’s) estate at the time of his death. From there it went to the library of the Berliner Singakademie. In 1855 it was sold to the Royal Library of Berlin (Königliche Bibliothek Berlin.)

The original title in Bach’s handwriting is missing. C.P.E. Bach writes out the title, but on top of the 1st page of the score Bach wrote:

J. J. Concerto Doīca 16 post Trinit. [The line over the ‘ī’ is an abbreviation for ‘mini’.]

Between mvts. 2 & 3:
Aria à Hautb da Caccia e Cembalo obligato

And above the oboe part:
Hautb. da Caccia

Mvt. 4:
Recit. Violini e Viole

After mvt. 4:
Aria sequitur

Beginning of mvt. 5:
Aria Violini è Viole

At the end of mvt. 5:
Choral

Under the chorale:
Fine SDG.

The Original Parts:

Although several of the original parts had remained with C.P.E. Bach along with the autograph score, the remaining parts found their way via the Berliner Singakademie to the BB. At some point they had belonged to the manuscript collection of the Counts Voß-Buch where the missing pages were united with the others.

Ten separate copyists [anonymous/unknown] were involved in creating the set of parts. Christian Gottlob Meißner (not among the above) is the only one known by name. Bach revised and made corrections to the parts, but he did not finished putting in the numbers for the figured bass. He probably ran out of time before finishing it.

The final chorale is a composition by Johann Rosenmüller, dating from 1649 where it served as part of the funeral service for Johann Elisabeth Teller, Leipzig. In the printed version of the latter, the title is “Valet und Trostlied eine Sterbenden” [“A Farewell and Song of Comfort for a person who is dying.”]

 

Cantata BWV 27: Details & Complete Recordings | Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

References: Main Page | Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Other Vocal BWV 225-249 | Chorales BWV 250-300 | Chorales BWV 301-350 | Chorales BWV 351-400 | Chorales BWV 401-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-524 | Vocal Works BWV Anh | BGA | NBA | BC: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | Sources
Discussions of BWV Numbering System: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Introduction | Cantatas | Other Vocal | Instrumental | Performers | General Topics | Articles | Books | Movies | New
Biographies | Texts & Translations | Scores | References | Commentaries | Music | Concerts | Festivals | Tour | Art & Memorabilia
Chorale Texts | Chorale Melodies | Lutheran Church Year | Readings | Poets & Composers | Arrangements & Transcriptions
Search Website | Search Works/Movements | Terms & Abbreviations | Copyright | How to contribute | Sitemap | Links



 

Back to the Top


Last update: ýApril 1, 2012 ý16:49:41