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Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

Cantata BWV 188
Ich habe meine Zuversicht
Discussions - Part 4

Continue from Part 3

Discussions in the Week of July 22, 2012

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 22, 2012):
Introduction to BWV 188 -- Ich habe meine Zuversicht

Weekly reminder:

This week we continue Trinity season cantatas with BWV 188, the last of four works for the 21st Sunday after Trinity. Details of text, commentary, recordings, and previous discussion for this week are accessible via: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV188.htm

The commentary by Julian Mincham, music examples included, is especially recommended as an introduction to listening.

The BWV 188 page has convenient access to notes from the Gardiner, Koopman (notes by Christoph Wolff), Suzuki, and Leusink (and more!) CD issues, via link beneath the cover photo.

The chorale text and melody are accessible via links at the BWV 188 page. Francis Browne has recently added new commentary on the cantata texts to his interlinear translations, linked via [English 3]. We can expect these to continue, not necessarily weekly. Douglas Cowling and William Hoffman are also posting relevant to chorales and other music for the Lutheran Church Year, accessible via LCY pages.

I do not always take the time to check all links before posting. Special thanks to the folks who provide timely corrections.

Charles Francis wrote (July 22, 2012):
[To Ed Myskowski] There is a technically excellent performance of the opening Sinfonia with Alte Musik Berlin conducted by Hans-Christoph Rademann available as a video. Superb and enjoyable as it is, it strikes me as a virtuosic concert hall-like rendition, rather than reverential - perhaps appropriate, though, given this movement's secular origin. I also wonder whether it would sound quite so impressive without the close miking, say in the middle of a sizeable church, with the performers up in the organ loft. The link is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gehHKBjR7eg

Leonhardt's remarks on contemporary early music performance come to mind: http://www.earlymusicworld.com/id2.html

As an exercise I had a go at arranging the closing chorale for organ and have uploaded the result here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnHwOO6GbG4

Julian Mincham wrote (July 23, 2012):
[To Charles Francis] This is a reconstruction of the last movement of the concerto for harpsichord now for organ but we don't know what changes Bach may have made in transcribing it because only the last 25 or so bars have survived. Interestingly this D minor work is one of only two (from memory!) concerti which Bach took all three movements from for the cantatas--mostly he just cherry picked a movement here and there. We can get some clues from Bach's own transcription of the first movement of this work though--e.g. simplification of some figuration and sustained chords replacing rapid note movement. I think it like that he would have made a number of similar changes in the transcription of this work too but as we don't have the score we don't know.

Douglas Cowling wrote (July 23, 2012):
Charles Francis wrote:
< I also wonder whether it would sound quite so impressive without the close miking, say in the middle of a sizeable church, with the performers up in the organ loft. The link is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gehHKBjR7eg >
This is a classic modern performance which, as polished as it is, uses a small portative organ that can barely be heard above the orchestra. The strings and oboes are pulling back on their harmonic oom-pahs but they still swamp the organ. I'm not saying a big organ sound is preferable, but certainly the colour of a large organ is required.

Charles Francis wrote (July 23, 2012):
[To Douglas Cowling] I suppose one issue is that modern audiences expect a multimedia spectacle where performers are placed at the front to be clearly seen and heard. A collocated positive/portative/modern organ then obviates any timing and/or logistical issues. All made possible because today's cantata performances are commonly divorced from liturgy.

Sacred music concerts in my part of the world inevitably take place in ancient churches and on occasion the performers will be situated in the gallery. This happens infrequently in the case of Bach, however, and the only such cantata performance I can bring to mind was conducted by a certain Count Nikolaus de la Fontaine und d'Harnoncourt-Unverzagt in Graz Dom. I recall being seriously underwhelmed at the time, but perhaps a slower tempo and fewer singers would have added sonic clarity.

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 24, 2012):
Charles Francis wrote:
< Count Nikolaus de la Fontaine und d'Harnoncourt-Unverzagt >
Presumably this is the same gentleman usually know as H (as in H&L) on these pages?

Charles Francis wrote (July 24, 2012):
[To Ed Myskowski] Yep - he descends from aristocratic lineage - one of those peculiar European things (I'm guessing here you're from Hawaii where I once tramped over hot lava and viewed the rings of Saturn).

In the late eighties and early nineties I was fortunate to spend much time in Graz, H's home town, which enjoyed a very healthy Early Music scene with concerts of often obscure repertoire packed with young people in jeans and tea shirts. Memorable ones included GL and Arvo Pärt (not so early, though).

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 26, 2012):
Charles Francis wrote:
< I'm guessing here you're from Hawaii where I once tramped over hot lava and viewed the rings of Saturn). >
Actually I (Ed M) am from Salem MA. I adopted the Aloha spirit via several research trips to the Big Island, under sponsorship of the Peabody Essex Museum, which represents an enduring maritime (and missionary!) connection between Salem and the former Sandwich Islands.

A special thank you to Charles Francis for taking the time to create and/or find and post many enjoyable and informative U-tube links.

 

Cantata BWV 188: Details & Complete Recordings | Recordings of Individual Movements | Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4

Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

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Last update: żAugust 23, 2012 ż00:19:38