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Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

Cantata BWV 140
Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme
Discussions - Part 4

Continue from Part 3

Aryeh Oron wrote (December 30, 2002):
BWV 140 – the importance of the recitatives

The Recordings

During the last ten days I have been listening to the following 25 recordings of Cantata BWV 140:

Traditional recordings

[2] Felix Prohaska (1st recording, 1951)
[3] Hermann Scherchen (1952)
[6] Marcel Couraud (Mid 1950’s?)
[8] Felix Prohaska (2nd recording, 1959)
[9] Fritz Werner (1st recording, 1959)
[10] Kurt Thomas (1960)
[12] Erhard Mauersberger (1966)
[13] Wolfgang Gönnenwein (1967)
[14] Fritz Werner (2nd recording, 1970)
[15] Anders Öhrwall (1972)
[16] Karl Richter (2nd recording, 1977-1978)
[18] Raymond Leppard (1981)
[19] Hans-Joachim Rotzsch (1981-1983)
[20] Helmuth Rilling (1983-1984)
[21] Karl Münchinger (1984)
[26] Greg Funfgeld (1989)
[28] Blanche Honegger Moyse (1990)

HIP recordings

[22] Nikolaus Harnoncourt (1984)
[24] Joshua Rifkin (1986)
[27] John Eliot Gardiner (1990)
[30] Jeffrey Thomas (1995)
[31] Heinz Hennig (1995)
[32] Ton Koopman (TV programme, 1997)
[36] Stephen Cleobury (1999-2000)
[38] Pieter Jan Leusink (2000)

Background

With so many commentaries available on the Web and fine contributions by many members of the BCML, I shall allow myself skipping this section this time.

Review of the two recitatives

With so many recordings to listen to, it is indeed ‘mission-impossible’ to review them all. In a pace of 3 to 5 recordings to hear per day and after listening to each one of the above 25 recordings at least twice, I felt really exhausted. I could not force myself to listen to them in their completeness all over again. I do also remember that next week’s cantata (BWV 28) is already knocking on the door.

My main conclusion after so many listenings is that this cantata is well-tailored, both textually and musically, that the flow from movement to movement comes so naturally, as if the movement ensuing the one we hear is the most obvious link in the chain. The two recitatives form an important and integral part of this continuity. They are different from each other: the first – secco – for tenor; the second – accompanied – for bass. But both are full of substance and very enjoyable to listen to (with a capable singer, of course). I decided to give them special attention this time. Although inseparable organs from the body of the cantata, they deserve this, because the other movements of this cantata are already well-known and have been discussed by other members. Dick Wursten summarised so aptly the main message of both movements in his review sent to the BCML couple of days ago. I shall allow myself quoting him this time.

I do not have the time to write an extended review. I shall only summarise my impressions in a ranking table. The rating system is simple and in the final round of listening, each rendition fell into its place in the table according to its own merits and in relation to other renditions.

What do we ask from a singer in performing a recitative? Not so much indeed: expressive powers, which should be used with taste and without over-interpretation; intelligence, which will enable him (or her) understanding of the message he (or she) has to convey; technical abilities, which should be used rather sparingly; and of course, good, rich, and pleasant voice with wide range and many colours and nuances. In short, a good recitative singer should avoid over-expressiveness on the one hand, but should not sound bland or apathetic on the other. He should give attention to every detail, while maintaining the overall picture. Other factors, which should be considered, are clean diction, precise pronunciation, and tasteful accentuation. While singing a recitative the singer is barely exposed (especially in secco recitatives). All his shortcomings become more evident when he (or she) is singing, because he (or she) does not have a melody to rely on to grab the attention of the listener, or solo instrument to share the responsibility with.

Some singers are getting lost when they have to sing a recitative; others are masters of this domain. The worst cause you to re-think, if the recitatives are inapplicable at all. The best are telling you a story, to which you want to listen again and again. If a singer is capable of giving a touching rendition of a recitative, you forget about all the technical matters and other factors and just listen.

The ranking scheme:

A: Excellent (to take to a lonely island)
B: Good (deserves repeated hearings)
C: Above average (almost good)
D: Mediocre (nothing to write home about)
E: Poor (not so bad, but certainly below average), or simply irritating, or boring
F: Bad (should be avoid)

Mvt. 2 Recitative for Tenor
Continuo
Er kommt, er kommt
(He comes, he comes)
And indeed there he is already! The best friend of the groom, or a watchman of David's city depicts how he is coming nearer, leaping over the hills, young and vital like a gazelle, eager to meet his beloved bride... The notification of the imminence of his coming becomes the announcement of his arrival… and in the following.

A: Mauersberger/Schreier [12], Gönnenwein/Altmeyer [13], Richter/Schreier [16], Rotzsch/Schreier [19], Harnoncourt/Equiluz [22]
B: Prohaska II/Equiluz [8], Werner I/Krebs [9], K. Thomas/Rotzsch [10], Werner II/Huber [14], Hennig/Kobow [31], Koopman TV/Odinius [32]
C: Rilling/Baldin [20], Rifkin/J. Thomas [24], Funfgeld/Gordon [26], Gardiner/Rolfe-Johnson [27]
D: Couraud/Paid [6], Öhrwall/Björkegren [15], Leppard/Baldin [18], J. Thomas/J. Thomas [30], Leusink/Meel [38]
E: Münchinger/Winbergh [21], Honneger-Moyse/Humphrey [28], Cleobury/Bostridge [36]
F: Scherchen/Kmentt [3], Prohaska I/Uhl [2],

Mvt. 5 Recitative for Bass
Violino I/II, Violino piccolo, Viola, Continuo
So geh herein zu mir
(So come inside to me)
The bridegroom invites the bride to enter... The communion is sealed and all miseries of life are taken off the bride, when she becomes 'one' with her groom. The communion is celebrated in an 'unio mystica', the blissfulness of which you can sense when you listen to.

A: Mauersberger/Adam [12], Gönnenwein/Sotin [13], Werner II/Stämpfli [14], Richter/DFD [16]
B: K. Thomas/Adam [10], Rotzsch/Lorenz [19], Rilling/Huttenlocher [20], Koopman TV/Mertens [32]
C: Prohaska II/Braun [8], Werner I/Kelch [9], Öhrwall/Hagegård [15], Münchinger/Krause [21], Hennig/Frank [31]
D: Scherchen/Pöll [3], Harnoncourt/Hampson [22], Rifkin/Opalach [24], Gardiner/Varcoe [27], J. Thomas/Sharp [30], Leusink/Ramselaar [38]
E: Prohaska I/Braun [2], Leppard/Ramey [18], Funfgeld/Lichti [26], Honneger-Moyse/Sylvan [28]
F: Couraud/Titze [6], Cleobury/George [36]

That’s all this time. I need now to take a rest from this cantata for a year or so.

Aryeh Oron wrote (Decmber 30, 2002):
BWV 140 – timings of recordings

Thomas Braatz wrote:
< [snip] If other listeners have the timings for the other recordings which I do not have, it might be helpful, particularly because there are so many recordings available, to include these in my list so that we can gain a better perspective regarding tempi used by various conductors over the past half-century. For instance, did Gardiner [27] break the speed barrier in Mvt. 1 or anywhere else in the cantata? >
Following your request I prepared a table of timings for all the 25 recordings of BWV 140 at my diposal. Here it is:

No.

Conductor

Year

Mvt. 1

Mvt. 2

Mvt. 3

Mvt. 4

Mvt. 5

Mvt. 6

Mvt. 7

TT

[1]

Robert Shaw

1946

[2]

Felix Prohaska I

1951

8:04

1:03

5:50

4:29

1:36

6:35

2:18

30:08

[3]

Hermann Scherchen

1952

8:02

1:19

5:35

4:05

1:48

7:29

2:58

31:16

[5]

Karl Richter I

1955

34:08

[6]

Marcel Couraud

1950’s

7:53

0:52

6:29

4:19

1:12

5:53

2:11

29:07

[8]

Felix Prohaska II

1959

7:15

1:13

6:05

4:39

1:47

4:14

1:51

27:04

[9]

Fritz Werner I

1959

8:38

1:01

5:44

5:08

1:32

6:10

2:21

30:43

[10]

Kurt Thomas

1960

8:02

1:04

6:56

5:00

1:35

7:10

2:26

32:13

[11]

Karl Ristenpart

1962

[12]

Erhard Mauersberger

1966

7:30

1:01

6:16

4:05

1:39

6:16

1:51

28:38

[13]

Wolfgang Gönnenwein

1967

8:06

1:11

6:50

4:44

1:23

6:51

1:56

31:04

[14]

Fritz Werner II

1970

8:07

1:18

5:31

5:05

1:37

6:33

2:06

29:32

[15]

Anders Öhrwall

1972

7:11

0:56

5:38

4:10

1:27

6:11

1:40

27:13

[16]

Karl Richter II

1977-8

9:38

1:20

6:54

5:58

2:00

6:21

1:49

34:00

[18]

Raymond Leppard

1981

7:17

1:05

6:38

4:18

1:26

5:53

2:14

28:51

[19]

Hans-Joachim Rotzsch

1981-3

7:27

0:53

6:08

4:03

1:33

6:28

1:38

28:14

[20]

Helmuth Rilling

1983-4

6:07

1:10

5:07

3:52

1:30

4:53

1:35

24:15

[21]

Karl Münchinger

1984

6:13

1:13

6:13

3:57

1:41

7:35

1:51

28:47

[22]

Nikolaus Harnoncourt

1984

7:10

0:58

6:33

3:59

1:37

6:23

1:49

28:29

[23]

Wayne Riddell

1985

28:30

[24]

Joshua Rifkin

1986

6:14

0:53

5:20

3:47

1:19

5:29

1:52

24:54

[26]

Greg Funfgeld

1989

6:47

0:56

5:56

3:59

1:37

5:47

1:56

26:58

[27]

John Eliot Gardiner

1990

6:17

0:52

5:32

3:49

1:27

5:03

1:35

24:35

[28]

Blanche Honegger-Moyse

1990

7:33

0:57

6:06

4:28

1:24

5:43

1:49

28:00

[30]

Jeffrey Thomas

1995

6:06

0:51

5:00

4:14

1:29

5:31

1:32

24:43

[31]

Heinz Hennig

1995

6:50

0:57

5:33

4:14

1:26

6:04

1:48

26:52

[32]

Ton Koopman TV *

1997

6:45

0:46

5:36

3:33

1:21

5:47

1:26

25:46

[36]

Stephen Cleobury

1999

6:09

0:53

5:56

4:15

1:14

5:11

1:56

25:34

[38]

Pieter Jan Leusink

2000

7:15

1:03

6:04

4:18

1:24

5:55

1:39

27:38

* The TT of Koopman’s programme includes also breaks between movements.

Francine Renee Hall wrote (December 31, 2002):
[To Aryeh Oron] My first time on BachRecordings you acted as supurb sleuth and figured out that a recording I heard long ago was none other than Mauersberger's BWV 140 [12]. And now my first time on BachCantatas you not only give a wonderful read concerning the recitatives but you rate Mauersberger an 'A'.

I want to learn all the ins and outs of Bach's cantatas, and your study here has been a joy. Thank you!

Matthew Neugebauer wrote (December 31, 2002):
[To Francine Renee Hall] And I'm so glad someone agrees with me about recitatives - I just love them!

(I really don't know why that is, except for maybe the fact that recits get through the text much faster? ah me and my adolescents!)

Ehud Shiloni wrote (December 31, 2002):
Following snippets from Aryeh's extensive review of the recitatives:
Aryeh Oron wrote:
< Traditional recordings
[13] Wolfgang Gönnenwein (1967)
The ranking scheme:
A: Excellent (to take to a lonely island)
Mvt. 5 Recitative for Bass
A: Gönnenwein/Sotin
[13]>
I am glad that Aryeh gave my favorite Sotin a well deserved "A". In fact, the main reason I take this CD from the shelf is to listen to that glorious voice again - not only in the recitative but also in the two excuisite duets with Elly Ameling. Hans Sotin had a voice without equal among modern day Bach singers - deep, dark, full-body, earth-moving, glass-shattering "Basso Profundo". It is always a moving experience for me to hear his voice, and I only regret that this opera singer did not record a lot of Bach.

Thanks, Aryeh, for the "A" rating, and many thanks for your unbelievable, continued work on the Cantatas.

Happy 2003 to all!

Neil Halliday wrote (January 2, 2003):
[To Aryeh Oron] You draw attention to the fact that the 1st recitative (for tenor) is 'secco', and contrast this with the 2nd for bass, which is accompanied.

Robertson's book confirms that the 1st is for Tenor and continuo, while the 2nd is for Bass, violins 1 and 2, violas and violoncello piccolo, plus continuo; but if one looks at the score of this cantata, available at the David Zale site, one notices that the 1st recitative has a fully written-out score which 'looks' the same as that for the 2nd, with treble and bass notes tied over into the next bar, and few places showing a full rest on both staves.

I wonder if the accompaniment of the 1st should be played as written, if only on the organ accompanied by a string bass (continuo), in contrast to Harnoncourt's rendition [22] which consists of the tenor line punctuated by mostly short detached chords on the organ, with much of what appears in the score entirely missing. Also notice that Harnoncourt employs this minimalist approach to the accompaniment of the 1st duet for and bass - with much of what is written in the score apparently missing.

Matthew Neugebauer wrote (January 2, 2003):
[To Neil Halliday] What's the url for the score of the David Zale site?

Is this a piano-vocal score only? These tend to do more complex fig bass realizations than if it were a full-score performance, because in the performance the realization is improvised, while the realization in a vocal score or any written-out realization for that matter is preset, so the realizer (if that's the right word) can make keyboard score, full with a 4-part harmonization, suspensions, anticipations, etc., while the continuo player in a performance may not necessarily be able to do that.

However, I've never even touched a harpsichord in my life-so I hope there are people out there who can comment on this more.

Ludwig wrote (January 2, 2003):
[To Matthew Neugebauer] First of all if you have never played a harpsichord in your life you should seek one out and ask to play if you can play. The first thing you will notice is that there are usually two manuals and stops as on an organ.

The next thing you will notice is that this instrument can not be played like a piano. The sound ceases the minute the key is released and somewhere between all the foregoing you will notice depending on the maker that the keys want to resist to being depressed or in a better instrument that the keys yield easily but there is still a resistence factor. This is because the keys are directly connected to a plucktrum (like a guitar pick--to over simply this) which must overcome the wires and then fall back into the holes from which they sprang when you depresses the key. The whole is someething like playing certain tracker organs with all the stops drawn where you not only have to overcome opening the wind channel so the pipes can sound but the springs beneath the pallet (a type of valve that admits wind to the wind channels for the pipes to speak) offer some resistence combine with the force of the wind against the closed pallet.

Now as far as figured bass is concerned ---the best way to learn this is to study the rules of harmony for the period of the music that you are playing for instance 7ths which Beethoven was fond of are not allowed. Once you have memorized these rules; the next thing you need to do is join a jazz group---and the rules here go against just about everything that you memorized before. When you get so you can play jazz well under no printed music conditions then you should go back and use the rules you memorized and use them to play figured base. The figures under a given note indicate the base of the harmony that is to be played but instead of playing boring chords you will instead improvise according to the rules as you did with jazz without the rules. If you are gifted in the areal you can take a mediocre composer's work and turn it into something of a great masterpiece.

Neil Halliday wrote (January 2, 2003):
[To Matthew Neugebauer] The URL is: www.mymp3sonline.net. (Sorry for the absence of a hyperlink).

Go to Bach Cantatas, and then follow directions. This is a wonderful site, if you have a broadband connection.

Yes, I forgot that the 'continuo' as Bach left it, in the secco recitatives, consists of only numbers below the stave (figured bass), and this is a (piano) realisation, which nevertheless would sound nice, if played as written in this score, on an organ similar to the one Harnoncourt uses in his recording [22] (which you can listen to, at the same site. Equiluz' singing is commendable, in this movement).

I agree with Mr. Beethoven's(!) post that mere, near staccato, detached chords (like those employed in Harnoncourt's performance of this recitative) are "boring", and wonder if Bach would have been content with such austere realisations.

In the 'accompanied' recitatives, such as the 2nd one in BWV 140 (ie, the 5th movement), the realisation of the figured bass is obviously not as critical because , in this case, you already have three upper string parts to listen to - I venture that, with the addition of an artistic string bass realisation, no harpsichord is really required for a satisfying performance (harpsichords often produce little more than a pitchless 'tinkling' sound in recordings anyway, when used as a continuo instrument), and Mr. Braatz has commented on the intrusive and possibly superfluous sound of the organ in some of Richter's recordings, in movements other than secco recitatives and arias with only continuo accompaniment.

Actually, Harnoncourt's realisation [22] (or rather, his organist) of the continuo of the 2nd (accompanied) recitative is not bad; the organ has a somewhat legato realisation which blends reasonably well with the strings, and does not overpower them.

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 2, 2003):
BWV 140 - The Chorale for Tenor ‘Zion hört die Wächter singen' (Mvt. 4): choir or solo?

I thought that Cantata BWV 140 is behind me when I got the following message to my personal e-mail address. I do not mind answering private messages, but I do not understand why a message of this kind was not sent directly to the BCML. After all, I assume that other members might have an interest in this topic.

Hugo Saldias [Denver, Co] wrote (December 31, 2002) (off-list):
Dear Aryeh Oron

I see that you have listened to lots of versions of BWV 140

So I have a question please that I have found no satisfactory answer, maybe because there is flexibility on this matter:

On the Choral "Zion..." with strings at unison:

Should the melody be sung by tenor solo (like an aria) or by all the tenors of the choir?

Also from all the versions that you have listened to which ones gives the melody to a solo tenor and which ones to the choir of tenors please?

Happy New Year....

In the following list I indicated who sing the chorale in each one of the recordings of BWV 140 at my disposal.

Traditional recordings
[2] Felix Prohaska (1st recording, 1951): Choir
[3] Hermann Scherchen (1952): Choir
[6] Marcel Couraud (Mid 1950’s?): Choir
[8] Felix Prohaska (2nd recording, 1959): Choir
[9] Fritz Werner (1st recording, 1959): Choir
[10] Kurt Thomas (1960): Choir
[12] Erhard Mauersberger (1966): Solo (Peter Schreier)
[13] Wolfgang Gönnenwein (1967): Choir
[14] Fritz Werner (2nd recording, 1970): Choir
[15] Anders Öhrwall (1972): Choir
[16] Karl Richter (2nd recording, 1977-1978): Solo (Peter Schreier)
[18] Raymond Leppard (1981): Choir
[19] Hans-Joachim Rotzsch (1981-1983): Choir
[20] Helmuth Rilling (1983-1984): Choir
[21] Karl Münchinger (1984): Choir
[26] Greg Funfgeld (1989): Choir
[28] Blanche Honegger Moyse (1990): Solo (Jun Humphrey)

HIP recordings
[22] Nikolaus Harnoncourt (1984): Solo (Kurt Equiluz)
[24] Joshua Rifkin (1986): Solo (Jeffrey Thomas)
[27] John Eliot Gardiner (1990): Choir
[30] Jeffrey Thomas (1995): Choir
[31] Heinz Hennig (1995): Solo (Jan Kobow)
[32] Ton Koopman (TV programme, 1997): Choir (8 singers)
[36] Stephen Cleobury (1999-2000): Solo (Ian Bostridge)
[38] Pieter Jan Leusink (2000): Solo (Nico van der Meel)

I do not know if is there any indication in the authorised score (NBA) whether the chorale be sung by the tenor section of the choir or by a tenor solo. I hope that the knowledgeable Thomas Braatz, and maybe others, would be able to throw a light on this matter. As in many other cases, it might all come up to personal taste. Judging by the recordings, most of those in which a tenor soloist was given the challenging task of singing the chorale are problematic, to say the least. Or are our ears already poisoned by over-familiarity with the chorale? Singing the chorale melody against the counter-melody played by the strings in unison, the tenor must have a rich and strong voice along the whole range, and he has to hold a stable line convincingly. Only Schreier in his recording with Mauersberger [12] (but not with Richter [16]) and, most surprisingly, Kobow with Hennig [31] come close to give satisfactory renditions.

Enjoy and have another great Bach Year,

Matthew Neugebauer wrote (January 2, 2003):
< Go to Bach Cantatas, and then follow directions. This is a wonderful site, if you have a broadband connection. >
Yeah, I've tried getting scores off the bach-cantatas site, but the acrobat reader always comes up a blank screen and never loads the score. I guess this is alright since I already have the study full score of BWV 140 from the NBA! (Barenreiter)

Thomas Braatz wrote (January 2, 2003):
[To Aryeh Oron] It is interesting to view the entire list of 'choir vs. solo' in Mvt. 4 of BWV 140!

The NBA does not reveal any further information on this point other than to report that the designation for the voice is 'Tenore' which is the same designation that Bach used for tenor arias which quite obviously are only for a single tenor. On the other hand, this same term is also used where nothing but a number of singers of the same voice is implied - the final chorales, etc. (unless you are a hard 'dyed-in-the-wool'-type OVVP person.)

Regarding the proper method for performing this cantata, one commentator astutely pointed out that what we have here is an interesting experiment on the part of Bach: This mvt. entails the combination of 3 disparate elements that are so cleverly combined that they seem to belong to each other from the start. The bc is a strong, very melodious bc beginning with a repeated note passage slightly reminiscent of Mvt. 1 (the tolling of the bells); the violins (in unison) playing a bourée-like dance, and the chorale suspended in long notes in interspersed passages.

In order to preserve the very different quality of the chorale sung (long notes which the other parts do not have) by the tenor, it is necessary for this part to stand out through its very nature. This can best be achieved by using more than a single tenor (no matter how great such a soloist might be!) The reasons for this become quite apparent when listening to the various recordings where only a single tenor is used: there are some passages in the low range of the tenor where the voice loses volume and strength unless supported by other similar voices (as I pointed out - singing "Hosianna!" in the low range with the exclamation mark indicated in the text and score simply does not work with a single tenor.) Some single tenor versions have the single vocalist attempting to 'load on' extra interpretation/expression much to the detriment of the mvt. and whether Schreier had to receive special 'miking' to pull off this mvt. (as I suspect) in order to make the performance palatable for a recording audience only raises questions about the validity of this type of approach. The most successful recordings (IMHO) were those with a tenor section that had voices with little or no vibrato and where the voices sang a sustained line with conviction from the beginning to the end of each line of the chorale. The violins then rendered a hint of the bourée origins of their part without overdoing it as some HIP versions were prone to doing. The bc, providing the necessary firm foundation for the other parts and also had an individual character.

This mvt. seems to receive wide dissemination (not only in the number of recordings that Aryeh listed - and he has not even begun to list all the recordings which have only this mvt.! - such a list must be endless with new arrangements appearing all the time.) I have found this piece being seriously played as Christmas music and, of course, weddings:

>>Given in marriage by her mother and father, the bride wore a sleeveless white, knee-length, silk tweed dress and white dendrobium orchids in her hair. She carried a nosegay of red, orange and yellow calla lilies and fuchsia roses. The bridal party processed to J.S. Bach's "Sleepers Awake" and recessed to the Beatles' "When I'm Sixty-Four." Both pieces were arranged by George Holcomb, who played clarinet along with Eric Miller on guitar and Sarah Miller on the flute.<<

Did these individuals ever choose the duet mvts. (which might be more appropriate) from the cantata for a wedding? Probably not, for who could sing these mvts. properly? It was difficult enough to find entirely satisfactory recordings of these mvts. among all the recordings that Aryeh had listed on his site.

Matthew Neugebauer wrote (January 2, 2003):
[To Aryeh Oron] Great question, to which I can only say that from Aryeh's criteria (or suggestions) for singing the chorale as a solo, it is much easier and nicer for the hymn to be sung by the choral tenors. Therefore, it is more likely, based on the only evidence we really have (Aryeh's criteria, which is of course merely subjective and circumstantial evidence) that Bach intended it as a choral (unis) mvmt sung by the tenors. However, is there any way of knowing what Bach's practices were when he performed the work? Perhaps the fact that this only occurred twice in his lifetime clouds the matter a bit.

< I do not know if is there any indication in the authorised score (NBA) whether the chorale should be sung by the tenor section of the choir or by a tenor solo >
The NBA, or at least my score, makes no such indication.

< [24] Joshua Rifkin (1986): Solo (Jeffrey Thomas) >
As well, please keep in mind that this is an OVPP recording, so I guess Thomas is both the soloist and the choir in this case.

 

Continue on Part 5

Cantata BWV 140: Details & Complete Recordings | Recordings of Individual Movements | Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7

Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

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Last update: ýDecember 29, 2012 ý15:37:16