Recordings/Discussions
Background Information
Performer Bios

Poet/Composer Bios

Additional Information

References: Main Page | Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Other Vocal BWV 225-249 | Chorales BWV 250-300 | Chorales BWV 301-350 | Chorales BWV 351-400 | Chorales BWV 401-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-524 | Vocal Works BWV Anh | BGA | NBA | BC: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | Sources
Discussions of BWV Numbering System: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Cantata BWV 156
Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe!
Provenance

The autograph score was lost early on. It is not known whether it still existed at the time of Bach’s death nor who might have inherited it. Likewise, there is no trace of the original set of parts which must have been created from the autograph score for the first performance of this cantata on January 23, 1729. There is no record of any repeat performance of this cantata during the remaining years of Bach’s tenure in Leipzig.

The first appearance of a set of parts very likely copied from an original source was listed in the music library inventory of the St. Thomas School executed in 1823 by the Thomaskantor at that time: Christian Theodor Weinlig (1780-1842). It is clear, however, that this set was not part of the original sets of parts that Anna Magdalena Bach had donated to the school in 1750. The watermark of the paper used for these parts point to the paper manufacturer Friedrich Georg Cahl whose shop was located in Freiberg/Saxony and where such paper was produced from 1684-1761. Since paper from this workshop was never used by Bach or any of his copyists, it becomes necessary to establish a connection by means of circumstantial evidence. The most likely connection would be through Johann Friedrich Doles (1715-1797) who became the Thomaskantor in 1755 and was known to have a large collection of music manuscripts. His points of contact with Bach occurred from 1739-1744 when he attended the University of Leipzig and studied under Bach after which he assumed a position as cantor in Freiburg where the paper for the parts was manufactured. These parts were copied by an unknown copyist who at times made some very careless mistakes. It is from this set of parts that other 19th-century scores of this cantata were compiled. This set of parts is now found in the Bach-Archiv Leipzig (it had been temporarily stored in the Stadtarchiv Leipzig).

There are 10 parts: the single continuo part is transposed without figured bass. Three parts have no watermark: Canto, Tenore, Viola. The Alto and Bass seem to have been added later. The other parts are Hautbois, Violino 1 & 2, Violono.

Re: Mvt. 2

This vocal part is entered both into the alto and bass parts.

The alto part:
Despite the fact that an alto clef is entered first, the fact is that the notes are entered as if it were a tenor clef.

The bass part:
Although a bass clef is used, the notes must be read a 3rd lower than they appear.

As an explanation it must assumed that a rather inexperienced copyist was copying from an original source having a tenor clef and transposed the notes upwards rather than downwards. Some notes were transposed by a 2nd which might occur when one is transposing from a tenor clef. Since the use of unison voices throughout an entire movement would be unparalleled in Bach’s oeuvre, it is necessary to depend upon other indications contained in the prime source: the Doles(?) copy of the parts. Facts that speak in favor of a tenor voice: 1) the vocal range is from c to a’; which would be unusually high for a bass voice and too low for an alto; 2 the vocal range is comparable to other tenor parts that Bach composed around this time.

 

Based on NBA KB I/6 pp. 83-100
Contibuted by Thomas Braatz (June 1, 2008)

Cantata BWV 156: Complete Recordings | Recordings of Individual Movements | Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

References: Main Page | Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Other Vocal BWV 225-249 | Chorales BWV 250-300 | Chorales BWV 301-350 | Chorales BWV 351-400 | Chorales BWV 401-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-524 | Vocal Works BWV Anh | BGA | NBA | BC: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | Sources
Discussions of BWV Numbering System: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Introduction | Cantatas | Other Vocal | Instrumental | Performers | General Topics | Articles | Books | Movies | New
Biographies | Texts & Translations | Scores | References | Commentaries | Music | Concerts | Festivals | Tour | Art & Memorabilia
Chorale Texts | Chorale Melodies | Lutheran Church Year | Readings | Poets & Composers | Arrangements & Transcriptions
Search Website | Search Works/Movements | Terms & Abbreviations | Copyright | How to contribute | Sitemap | Links



 

Back to the Top


Last update: ýSeptember 24, 2011 ý08:09:59