Recordings/Discussions
Background Information
Performer Bios

Poet/Composer Bios

Additional Information

Bach Cantatas Website - Newsletters
Year 2006

New Addition to the BCW - Composers

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 1, 2006):
J.S. Bach was not only the greatest composer of his generation but of all time. If anybody has needed any proof, he/she should listen to his works played around the clock for 10 days from BBC (UK) and from WKCR (NY). I cannot imagine any other composer justifying such ambitious broadcasting programmes. Greatest, indeed, but not an isolated figure. He belonged to a big musical family, his main post had other important composers before and after him, he used musical material of many composers, and this material has been used (and actually continued to be used) by many other composers.

In order to give fuller view of J.S. Bach's musical surroundings, I have started adding to the BCW short biographies of composers relating to J.S. Bach. These composers belong to one or more of the following categories:

a. Composers of Chorale Melodies.
Each composer page in this group includes a list of the CM he composed with links to the relevant CM pages.
See, for example, Andreas Hammerschmidt: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Hammerschmidt.htm

b. Composers who composed works based on CM used by J.S. Bach.
Each composer page includes a list of his works in which he used CM's with links to the relevant CM pages.
See, for example, Gottfried August Homilius: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Homilius-Gottfried-August.htm

s. Thomaskantors.
See list at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Performers/Thomaskantors.htm

d. Members of the Bach family.
See at list: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Family-Name.htm

A complete list of the composers together with hymn writers and librettists whose texts were used in J.S. Bach's works can be found at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/index.htm

Enjoy and Happy New Bach Year,

 

The Bach Cantatas Website celebrates its 5th anniversary

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 2, 2006):
The Bach Cantatas Website (BCW) was launched in its current form and address on December 30, 2000.

The BCW is located at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com
This a comprehensive site covering all aspects of J.S. Bach's cantatas and his other vocal works. The BCW contains discussions and detailed discographies of each cantata and other vocal works, performers and general topics. The BCW also includes texts and translations, scores, music examples, articles and interviews, and short biographies of more than 3,100 performers of Bach vocal works (singers, conductors, vocal and instrumental groups). There are also other relevant resources such as a discussion of the Lutheran church year, database of chorale texts & melodies and their authors, reviews and discussions of Bach's non-vocal works, terms and abbreviations, schedule of concerts of Bach's vocal works, guide to Bach tour, thousands of links to other relevant resources. The BCW is an international collective project, being compiled from various postings about the subject, most of which have been sent to the Bach Cantatas Mailing List.

I would like to use this opportunity to thank the numerous contributors to the discussions in the BCML, BRML, Bach Musicology and some other lists, whose messages are compiled into the pages of the BCW. Their names are mentioned accordingly above each quoted message. I would also like to thank the many Bach lovers who have sent me material to be included in the BCW, such as articles, translation of cantata texts, recording details, biographies, photos, music examples, links to other sites, etc. Their names are mentioned accordingly in the relevant pages.

There have been many improvements & additions to the BCW last year. I would not like to repeat them here. If you are interested, please take a look at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Topics/Newsletter-2005.htm

The number of visits at the BCW has been grown up significantly, and almost doubled over the past year. During the last couple months the number of DAILY visits is more than 10,000!. More statistics of the BCW can be found at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Statistics.htm

I am encouraged by the positive feedback the BCW is getting from all over the world. Many of the feedback messages from last year can be read at the pages: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Topics/About-2005.htm

To mark the beginning of the New Year, I have replaced the Bach picture at the Home Page of the BCW with a photo of Bach Memorial in Dornheim, which I took in my last Bach Tour in May 2004. This Memorial marks Bach's marriage with Maria Barbara on October 17, 1707.

I continue to look forward to receiving your comments (corrections, suggestions, improvements, etc.) about the BCW. The instructions how to send me comments, appear in the following page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/How.htm

I wish you all another Great and Happy Bach Year!

 

Lutheran Church Year - Update

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 15, 2006):
Dr. Thomas Jaenicke provided the Lutehran Church Year (LCY) for the years 2007 to 2012.
I had to spilt the LCY into several pages:

Explanation of the LCY: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/index.htm
LCY 2000-2005: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/Lutheran-2000-2005.htm
LCY 2006-2010: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/Lutheran-2006-2010.htm
LCY 2011-2015: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/Lutheran-2011-2015.htm

The Readings for each event in the LCY, provided by Francis Browne:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Read/index.htm

I hope you will find this info useful.

 

Bach Cantatas Website - Some major revisions

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 29, 2006):
I would like to inform you of some major revisions of the Bach Cantatas Website:

1. Revision of the Cantata Recording Pages:

The revision includes:

a. At the header of the page (Cantata Details):
Event: Adding the Readings with links to the Readings pages.
Composed: Adding exact performance dates & places, with links to the Place pages (Bach Tour section).
Text: Adding links to the CT's used by Bach in this cantata.
Scoring: Adding links to the Mvt. pages & to the CM's used by Bach in this cantata.

b. Recordings:
Re-arranging the recordings chronologically, according to recording date.
Adding many new recordings, both old and recent.
For each recording:
- Adding recording place.
- Adding links to stores as Amazon. The links to stores allow you to listen to extracts from the cantata and even continue to buy the album, if you wish.

This project has taken me several months and is now finished. The cantata pages would be updated continuously, as new recordings are released, CM's, CT's and translations pages are added, etc.

I am extremely grateful to all the people who have sent me info about unfamiliar and/or new recordings. Their named are mentioned at the bottom of the relevant pages.

2. Revision of the Translation Pages:

a. All the Dutch, Hebrew, Italian, Spanish & Portuguese translations were converted to parallel format. This format allows the listener following the German singing and understanding it by reading the translation. Other translations present the chosen language vs. the German in other formats, such as Interlinear (English, by Francis Browne), Note-to-Note (French, by Jean-Pierre Grivois) or Word-for-Word (Indonesia, by Rianto Pardede)
b. Adding cindex pages for each language, sorted by BWV Number, Title and Event.

This project has also taken me several months and is now finished. This section includes over 1,200 translation pages. I am grateful to the translators, who have contributed their translations to the BCW, and by that helped to make Bach texts more approachable to many people world-wide. I am always open to add translations to more languages.

3. Navigation Bar

To improve the navigation of the BCW (with over 10,000 pages), I have started replacing the Icon of the Home Page at the upper right corner of each page with Navigation Bar at the top of the page, which allows you getting easily to each section of the BCW with 1-click.

This project started about a week ago. All the main pages, CM pages, Readings pages and many other pages already include the new Navigation Bar.

I hope you would find the revised pages and the new feature useful.

As always, ideas for improvements, corrections, etc. are most welcome.

 

BCW - Short Descriptions

Aryeh Oron wrote (February 8, 2006):
About two weeks ago I informed you of the new Navigation Bar, which is being added at the top of the BCW pages, allowing you getting easily to each section with 1-click.

Realising that many users of the BCW (about 11,000 daily visits), especially first-time visitors, might need some guidance finding their way in the wealth of information (more than 30,000 files), I have added a short introduction at the beginning of each section. The short intro tells you what you can expect to find in the section, and how to contribute to the contents. I am grateful to Thomas Braatz and Francis Browne who have helped me writing some of the intros.

I hope you would like these short intros and find them useful. If you think they are not clear enough and/or should be improved, please inform me.

 

Search

Aryeh Oron wrote (March 12, 2006):
[To Ed Myskowski] In my question I was referring to the Search Works/Movements facility, which was added at that time (July 2005) to the BCW. A link to this facility is now included in the new Navigation Bar at the upper and lower ends of each page of the BCW. I know that this facility is being used because there are about 600-700 monthly queries. The question was about the convenience of using this facility. Since I have received no complaints so far, I understand that it is OK. Nevertheless, I am always open to suggestions for improvements.

Regarding Search, I have recently replaced the main Search facility at the Home Page of the BCW from FreeFind to Google. I believe that most visitors of the BCW are more used to Google than to FreeFind. A link to the Search Website facility is also included in the new Navigation Bar. The Search Website page includes now both Google and FreeFind.

 

Editing the BCML messages into the BCW

Aryeh Oron wrote (March 15, 2006):
The messages in the BCML are compiled into the various pages of the BCW through process of selection and editing. Following a good advice from Bradley Lehman, I changed the Copyright Notice to reflect this. See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Copyright.htm
The editing includes, among other things, adding missing BWV designations, links to the relevant page of each BWV number, etc. The editing also includes deleting unnecessary quotes of previous messages.

This selection and editing process is done, of course, manually. If you want to save me time, I would appreciate if you include BWV designation, as well as quote only the relevant paragraph to which your message is relating. See Guideline C: http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/BachCantatas/

BTW, following some feedback, I have started converting the discussion pages of the BCW into a new, narrower format, for easier reading.
See, for example: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV144-D.htm
and compare it to: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV83-D.htm
The converting process would be applied only to new pages or current pages to which new messages are added.

 

Inventions & Sinfonias BWV 772-801 - Recordings & Discussions

Aryeh Oron wrote (April 2, 2006):
I have compiled a list of the complete recordings of the Inventions & Sinfonias BWV 772-801 (I&S). I have used every possible source I could find, including websites as J.S. Bach Home Page, All Music Guide, web-stores as Amazon, and other websites I have been able to find using Google search engine, as well as various catalogues and my private collection.

You can find a list of the 63 complete recordings of I&S split into several pages, a page for a decade, starting at the page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV772-801.htm
In the same page you will be able to find links to discussion pages of these works (from 2001 onwards).

If you are aware of a recording of I&S not listed in these pages, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address.

Thanks & Enjoy,

 

New article on the Art of Fugue

Ewald Demeyere wrote (April 15, 2006):
I'm new to this list and would like to present myself a little bit. I'm 31 years old, I'm professor of harpsichord and musical theory at the conservatory of Antwerp (B). I also wanted to inform you that an article of mine about the Art of Fugue has been put on this site: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Articles/AOF-Demeyere.htm. In this text I examined the upper layer of Bach's counterpoint, a field within analysis which - I find - is quite neglected in our days. In doing this study I was bewildered to see how freely Bach treated the 'old rules'.

Looking forward to reactions!

 

Chinese translations of Bach cantatas

Yang Jingfeng wrote (April 18, 2006):
Aryeh Oron has kindly put my first four translations of Bach cantatas on the BCW.
Please see
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/IndexTexts-Chi-BWV.htm
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/IndexTexts-Chi-Title.htm
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/IndexTexts-Chi-Event.htm
I would be grateful if you have any comments on them.

My plan is to translate all the sacred cantatas into Chinese, either by doing it myself or inviting someone interested in it to join.

 

The Goldbergs Ride Again

Aryeh Oron wrote (May 1, 2006):
In January 2004, I informed you of a list I had compiled of the complete recordings of the Goldberg Variations BWV 988 (GV). The list included then 261 recordings. During the past two years I have gathered info of additional recordings, using every possible source I could find, including websites as a+30+a Goldberg Variations, J.S. Bach Home Page, All Music Guide, web-stores as Amazon, and other websites I have been able to find with Google search engine, as well as various catalogues and my private collection. Many members of the BRML and other Bach fans have supplied me info of unfamiliar recordings. Their names are mentioned as contributors at the bottom of the relevant pages. I am sincerely grateful to them all.

You can find the list of complete recordings of GV split into several pages, a page for a decade, starting at the page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV988.htm
All in all, 299 complete (or near complete) recordings of GV are listed (yes 300 minus one!). I am sure that somewhere an unfamiliar recording is hiding, waiting to be reported to make a round number. As a rule of thumb, each recording is listed only once. All the issues of each recording are presented together. If a performer has recorded the GV more than once, the info includes also the recording number. , the most prolific is Rosalyn Tureck with 7 recordings.

I have also compiled all the discussions of the GV from 2001 onwards (hundreds of messages). The discussions are arranged chronologically. If the recordings of GV of a certain performer are discussed, they are compiled into a dedicated page. Links to the discussion pages can be found at the starting page above, and at the recording pages.

If you are aware of a recording of GV not listed in these pages, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address.

Thanks & Enjoy,

 

Chorale Melodies & Chorale Texts Project - Progress Report and Questions

Aryeh Oron wrote (May 2, 2006):
Thomas Braatz, Francis Browne and I are progressing with the huge project of building a database of all the CM's (Choral Melodies) and CT's (Chorale Texts) used in Bach's vocal works. So far we have about 70 CM pages and about 60 CT pages. See:
Chorale Melodies: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/index.htm
Chorale Texts: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/IndexTexts-Chorales-Title.htm

AFAIK, there is no similar project over the web, and even info about the CM's and the CT's in good books is not so easy to use. The inter-links between the pages of CM's, CT's, authors of the CT's, composers of the CM's, other composers who used the CM, vocal works, movements, etc. should help the navigation and the make the research easier. The splitting of the data between the CT and CM helps to find simple solutions for complicated cases, where Bach set the same CT to several CM's, and vice versa.

The new CM pages are presented in a new format, which makes, so we hope, for even easier use. Each score sample is presented directly under the text where it is mentioned rather than all of them together at the lower part of the page. See, for example:
Old format: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/Christ-lag-in-Todesbanden.htm
New format: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/Christ-Jordan.htm

A few questions:
a. Do you find the new format easier to use?
b. When you print a hard copy of a chorale score sample on your own printers, are the images fuzzy or clear and sharp? Is the text typed under the notes directly and easily readable on the screen or on a printed copy or could this be improved?

And, of course, any corrections/additions/suggestions for improvements are most welcome.

Thanks & Enjoy,

 

The Duets BWV 802-805 - String or Pipe Keyboard?

Aryeh Oron wrote (May 6, 2006):
Following the discographies of the Inventions & Sinfonias BWV 772-801 and the Goldberg Variations BWV 988, I have added now a comprehensive discography of the 4 Duets BWV 802-805.

I have used every possible source I could find, including websites as J.S. Bach Home Page and All Music Guide, web-stores as Amazon and JPC, and other websites I have been able to find with Google search engine, as well as various catalogues and my private collection. Since I have not been able to find any similar discography of the Duets, I believe that this is the first time such an attempt is made and presented, at least on the web.

You can find the list of complete recordings of the Duets split into several pages, a page for a decade, starting at the page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV802-805.htm

All in all, over 90 complete (or near complete) recordings of the Duets are listed. As in previous discographies in the BCW, each recording is listed only once. All the issues of each recording are presented together. If a performer has recorded the Duets more than once, the info includes also the recording number.

With this impressive number of recordings, the Duets can hardly be called neglected. Maybe the explanation for their peculiar position lies in the short notes of Gunnar Johansen, to his recording of the Duets on Double Keyboard Piano in the early 1950's, done as a part of his Complete Bach Piano Works (20 albums, 43 LP's). Johansen wrote:

"THE FOUR DUETS, according to Schweitzer, came by accident to figure among the works for Organ contained in Clavierübung III (1739); how this accident occurred is not explained. Certainly these pieces in two voices are like maturer kin of the Inventions of almost two decades before. That these Duets categorically are for string keyboard instrument, would offer smallish fuel for argument - anyone who has heard these pieces as played by E. Power Biggs on the organ with "Bachish" registration will feel persuaded of their interchangeability between either string or pipe."

In my archives I found only one discussion of the Duets, from October 2002:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV802-805-Gen1.htm

These charming short pieces are called Duets because they were written for two equal parts, as the earlier 2-part inventions. Nos. 1 and 3 are joyful and fluent, whereas Nos. 2 & 4 are expressive harmonic fantasies. The minor key Duets (Nos. 1 & 4) embody some of Bach's most searchingly experimental chromatic counterpoint. The last is so expressive, varied and meticulous, that it can be considered as prelude to the Art of Fugue.

As almost every Bach piece, the Duets are opened for a wide variety of interpretations. Take, for example, four piano renditions: Gunnar Johansen, emotionally restrained, convinces you by his architectural approach that these pieces are 4 parts of a single work; Alexis Weissenberg, the most 'pianistic', is grasping you by a storm of feelings; Sviatoslav Richter (3 live recordings from a 1991 tour are available), with aristocratic playing, reveals the hidden tragic dimension of Duet No. 1; and the vivid Angela Hewitt, performs them with outmost sensitivity and endless nuances. I like them all, as well as many others.

I hope that the availability of the discography would evoke a discussion of these works. They certainly deserve it.
At least one BRML member has recorded them.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV802-805-Rec7.htm [91]

If you are aware of a recording of the Duets not listed in these pages, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address.

Thanks & Enjoy,

 

Order of Discussion - Update

Aryeh Oron wrote (June 8, 2006):
As you most probably know, this 2nd round, which started in January 2005, we discuss the cantatas chronologically, in the order J.S. Bach initially performed them. The chronological order allows us following Bach's development as a cantata composer. The discussion can cover every aspect relating to the cantata of the week: the music, the text, the recordings, a certain movement, etc.

In the 1st round of cantata discussions (1999-2003) the discussions were usually led by me. In order to make this 2nd round of cantata discussions successful, we have agreed that this responsibility would be shared among the members. Each person, who has agreed to take responsibility, is in charge for a period of 5 to 10 weeks, as he/she wishes. At the beginning of each week, this person sends a short notice to the BCML, reminding the members of the cantata for discussion that week. He/she has the option of adding some background, personal opinion, etc.

IMO, this concept has worked fine, and the cantata discussions are live and kicking. The leaders so far were: Neil Halliday, Thomas Shepherd, Peter Bright, Santu de Silva and, Thomas Braatz, John Pike, Douglas Cowling and Eric Bergerud. I am sincerely grateful to them all, as well as to thcontributors to the discussions.

The schedule of discussion leaders is covered until the end of 2006. See:
Year 2005: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Order-2005.htm
Year 2006: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Order-2006.htm

I have recently added Order of Discussions pages for 2007 and 2008; in other words, up to the end of the 2nd cycle of Cantata Discussions. See:
Year 2007: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Order-2007.htm
Year 2008: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Order-2008.htm

[Remark: since we started the 2nd cycle discussions, the page of Performance Dates of Bach's Vocal Works has been revised: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Date.htm
The consequence of this revision is that some works changed their places in the chronology. The few cantatas which we have skipped (BWV 143, BWV 202, BWV 158, BWV 37) are placed at the beginning of 2007 Order of Discussion page. After these 4, the order is as chronologically as possible.]

For 2007 and 2008 we do not have cantata discussions' leaders yet. More volunteers to lead the cantata discussions are needed. With more than 710 members of the BCML, many of them are experts in this field, I am hoping that more members would step forward and take upon themselves the responsibility of leading the cantata discussions. This is not a very difficult task and it helps putting the discussions into the right track.

Every member willing to lead the discussions for a certain period of time (5/10 weeks), is invited to write to me, either through the BCML or off-list.

 

Die Kunst der Fuge BWV 1080 - Revised Discography

Aryeh Oron wrote (June 13, 2006):
In January 2004, I informed you of a list I had compiled of the complete recordings of Die Kunst der Fuge (Art of Fugue = AOF) BWV 1080. During the past two years I have gathered info of additional recordings, using every possible source I could find, including: websites as J.S. Bach Home Page, All Music Guide and MusicWeb; web-stores as Amazon MDT and JPC; other websites I have been able to find with Google search engine; various catalogues and my private collection. Many members of the BRML and other Bach fans have supplied me info of unfamiliar recordings. Their names are mentioned as contributors at the bottom of the relevant pages. I am sincerely grateful to them all. Thomas Radleff deserves special gratitude for the info of the many recordings he has provided.

You can find the list of complete recordings of AOF split into several pages, a page for a decade, starting at the page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV1080.htm
All in all, 168 complete (or near complete) recordings of AOF are listed. As a rule of thumb, each recording is listed only once. All the issues of each recording are presented together. If a performer has recorded the AOF more than once, the info includes also the recording number.

I have not yet compiled the discussions of AOF (about 1,000 messages of this work in my archive!). It would take some time, and there are other projects of higher priority.

If you are aware of a recording of AOF not listed in these pages, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address.

 

The Thomaskantors - Update

Aryeh Oron wrote (June 13, 2006):
In January 2006 I informed you of a process I have been working on, of adding/expanding short biographies of all the Thomaskantors. I am glad to inform you that the list is now as complete as possible. See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Performers/Thomaskantors.htm
The list and the short biographies have been built with the help of Thomas Braatz and of Dr. Stefan Altner from the Thomanerchor.

There were 21 Thomaskantors before J.S. Bach and 16 after him to present. Among J.S. Bach's predecessors were important composers as: Johannes Galliculus and Wolfgang Figulus, and especially the line of six that served in this post before him: Sethus Calvisius, Johann Hermann Schein, Tobias Michael, Sebastian Knüpfer, Johann Schelle and Johann Kuhnau. The tradition of composers in this post continued after J.S. with figures as Johann Friedrich Doles (leading composer of Protestant church music), Johann Adam Hiller (creator of the German Singspiel) and Moritz Hauptmann (who was also an eminent theorist). It is interesting to note that during the on-going project of Chorale Melodies Thomas Braatz and I have found that many of these Thomaskantors/composers used CM's (which were also used by J.S. Bach) in their works.

However, you can find in the list also less important figures, even non-composers. For example, Johannes Scharnagel, who in 1511 flee from Leipzig because he was suspected in a homicide of a choir pupil, and was again accepted only later by the grace of the council.

If you find additional info/pictures, errors, etc. of any of the Thomaskantors, you are invited to send it to me, either through the BCML or to my private e-mail address.

 

Discographies of Bach's 4 big vocal works - Update

Aryeh Oron wrote (June 26, 2006):
During the past year I have revised, updated and expanded the discographies of complete recordings of Bach's 4 big vocal works: Mass in B minor BWV 232, Matthäus-Passion BWV 244, Johannes-Passion BWV 245, and Weihnachts-Oratorium BWV 248. After finishing this, I though that in order to make these discographies as complete as possible, I have to revise, update and expand also the recordings of individual movements from these works. I have used every possible source at my disposal: websites, web-stores, catalogues, my own collection, etc. Many members of the BCML and other Bach fans and collectors around the world have helped me in this enterprise and continue to do so. I am sincerely grateful to them all. The contributor names are listed at the bottom of the relevant discography pages.

I am glad to inform you that this project is now actually finished.

I set to myself a few guidelines:
- The recordings are presented chronologically, according to recording date.
- Each recording is listed only once, including reissues (all issues of each recording are presented together).
- Excerpts from complete recordings are not listed.
- If a conductor has recorded a big vocal work several times, the info includes also the recording number (a trivia question: who has recorded the MBM 5 times?).

For the complete recordings there is a page for each decade. The recordings of individual movements are listed in separate pages.

You can find them all through the main pages of each work:

Mass in B minor BWV 232 (127 complete recordings): http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV232.htm
Matthäus-Passion BWV 244 (117 complete recordings): http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV244.htm
Johannes-Passion BWV 245 (113 complete recordings): http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV245.htm
Weihnachts-Oratorium BWV 248 (92 complete recordings): http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV248.htm

If you are aware of a recording of these works (either complete or partial) not listed in these pages, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address.

 

Member Profiles

Aryeh Oron wrote (September 3, 2006):
The BCW includes a page of profiles of members & contributors.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Topics/Members-Profiles.htm

Last time there was a major update of this page was in 2004, when the Bach Mailing Lists have about halfmembers of what we have now. Many of the current contributors were not even members two years ago. Therefore, I thought it might be the right time to update this page in order to connect faces to names and to improve the communication.

All members, both new and veteran, contributors and lurkers alike, are invited to add their personal profile to the Member Profiles page. The needed details are: photo (jpg format, 180x235 pixels), name, occupation, town/country, when you joined the Bach List, personal website (if you have any). If you do not want your photo to appear, it is also acceptable. Simply write 'No photo'. Please send the details and the photo to my personal e-mail address: oron-a@inter.net.il and not to the Bach Lists.

I hope to see many member profiles in my inbox.

 

Schedule of Concerts of Bach's Vocal Works for 2006-2007 Season

Aryeh Oron wrote (September 10, 2006):
I am progressing with building the world-wide Schedule of Concerts of Bach's Vocal Works for the upcoming season (2006-2007).

For easier use each country has its own page for each calendar year. See:
Year 2006: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Concerts/Concert-2006.htm
Year 2007: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Concerts/Concert-2007.htm

I would like the Schedule to include EVERY concert in which Bach's vocal works are performed, by professional and amateurs performers alike. It does not matter if the performer has a website or not.

If any of you is aware of a performance of Bach's vocal works in your country or elsewhere, which is not listed in the Schedule, please inform me OFF-LIST. The instructions appear at the page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Concerts/index.htm

 

Bach's Actual and Potential "Supernumerarii" in Leipzig

Thomas Braatz wrote (September 11, 2006):
Aryeh Oron has kindly formatted for presentation on the BCW a list of names which I culled from the Bach-Dokumente. These individuals with whom Bach came into contract and upon whose musical capabilities he passed judgment during his Leipzig tenure include those pupils/students who are:

1. officially listed as being enrolled as Thomaner (either as "Interni" or "Externi")
2. officially enrolled at the University of Leipzig
3. Bach's private music students

The above categories are not mutually exclusive and there is still much to be learned about Bach's "supernumerarii" [the latter term was used by Bach's predecessor Johann Kuhnau to describe his 'free-floating' pool of singers and instrumentalists from which he could draw musical forces to complement his otherwise insufficiently staffed Thomanerchor which was often lacking in numbers to present figural music properly in the Leipzig churches].

Since the actual years of attendance at the Thomasschule and/or Leipzig University are indicated here, it will be possible to pinpoint more precisely just who was avaiable to Bach from outside of the Thomasschule at which point in time.

There is no evidence that these "supernumerarii" were in any way organized as a special group. When their talents were deemed sufficiently good in Bach's estimation, they seemed to welcome the opportunity to perform in the already existing musical groups [Thomanerchor, Collegium musicum] where the best music was being performed and where there was the hope or possibility that they might receive some remuneration for their efforts (perhaps even a good recommendation from Bach when they were applying for position as organist or cantor).

Any suggestions, corrections, or additions are welcome and should be sent to Aryeh Oron, webmaster of the BCW.

URL: http://bach-cantatas.com/Other/Thoman-List.htm

 

Hungarian Translations of Bach's Vocal Works

Aryeh Oron wrote (September 19, 2006):
One of the important sections of the BCW is the collection of about 1,400 translations of Bach's vocal works into various languages. We all know how strong is the connection between Bach's music and the text to which it was set. Understanding the sung text is therefore essential to intensify our enjoyment from the music. That's why I am continuously looking for additional translations.

The latest added language is Hungarian. The about 40 translations are not located at the BCW but in two websites of Hungarian ensembles. The translations have been found by a new member of the BCML, Pal Domokos, to whom I am sincerely grateful.

As with other languages, I have built 3 index pages of Hungarian translations sorted by.
BWV Number: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/IndexTexts-Hun-BWV.htm
Title: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/IndexTexts-Hun-Title.htm
Event: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/IndexTexts-Hun-Event.htm

I hope that the availability of Hungarian translations of Bach's vocal works, would make these sublime works more accessible to the community of Hungarian-speaking Bach lovers. Hungary is the country who has given to the world Julia Hamari, Eva Csapo, Magda Kalmar and Krisztina Laki, to name just a few of many Bach singers, conductors and ensembles.

Current status of translations into other languages:

English: Francis Browne - about 150, in progress.
Chinese: Yang Jingfeng - about 10, in progress
Dutch: Various contributors - about 30, slow progress
French: Jean-Pierre Grivois - all
Hebrew: Various contributors (most are mine) - almost all
Indonesian: Rianto Pardede - about 180, in progress
Italian: Emanuele Antonacci, Vittorio Marnati & Riccardo Pisano: - about 80, in progress
Portuguese: Rodrigo Maffei Libonati & Leonardo Santos - about 50, slow progress
Spanish: Various contributors - all

I am still looking for translations into other languages, such as Russian, Polish, Arabic, etc. If you speak one of those languages (or others) and you can not find translations into your language anywhere, you can always try your hands in preparing translations by yourself. By doing that, you would definitely help expanding the Bach message to the people who speak your language.

 

Breitkopf Collection of J.S. Bach's 4-Part Chorales

Aryeh Oron wrote (September 19, 2006):
The name of Breitkopf has become the main association with a collection of a large number of J.S. Bach’s 4-pt. chorales which are derived from Bach’s sacred vocal music (cantatas, Passions, oratorios, motets, etc.) and are presented in a reduced format (only two staves) to make them more easily playable on any keyboard instrument. In this type of reduction some important musical information contained in the original format (usually the final chorale of a cantata) is lost: independent instrumental parts, figured bass, articulation, dynamics, and, most importantly of all, the original chorale text. Thus it becomes apparent that the original purpose was not to preserve Bach’s composition of these wonderful chorales as is, but simply to use these reductions to demonstrate Bach’s supreme artistry in the harmonisation of a chorale. Indeed, this purpose became its raison d'ètre for more than a century after the first publication of this collection by Breitkopf in 1784-1787. It was not until about a century after Bach’s death that some musicians were beginning to realize that these often audacious harmonizations did not make much sense considered simply in isolation. In the 2nd half of the 19th century Ludwig Erk published these chorales with the assigned chorale texts, as far as those texts could be determined at that time.

Thomas Braatz contributed an article about the History of the Breitkopf Collection of J.S. Bach’s Four-Part Chorales.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Articles/Breitkopf-History.htm

As you can find in the article, there are different versions, hand-written copies and printings of the chorales that served as sources for the Breitkopf chorales. The most reliable system for referencing the Breitkopf numbers is to adopt the system of numbering used by the NBA. These numbers are also used by the 'Oxford Composer Companion - J.S. Bach' (1999). The titles of the chorales in the Breitkopf Collection might also be misleading: sometimes they represent the first verse of the Chorale Text (CT), sometimes they are the title of the Chorale Melody (CM), and in other cases neither of these. Furthermore, when the verse of the CT used in a Bach's vocal work is not the first, it usually has a different title (incipit).

To put everything in order, I have prepared a complete list of the 371 4-Part Chorales, using the NBA numbering. Whenever applicable, information, which also accounts for other earlier editions and manuscript copy collections, is also included.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/CM/IndexCM-Breitkopf.htm

All titles associated with the chorale are listed, using the following prefixes:
- B: The title in the Breitkopf list of 371 Four-Part Chorales.
- D: The title in the Dietel list (if different from B).
- R: The title in the Birnstiel collection (if different from B)
- O: The title in another source [mentioned in square brackets]
- M: The incipit of the mvt.

The chorales are arranged by Breitkopf number and include the following links:
- The relevant Mvt. page.
- The relevant CM page (empty entry means that the CM page has not yet been created).
- The relevant CT page (empty entry means that the CT page has not yet been created).

As we progress with the CM & CT project, empty entries would be filled.

A word of caution: the user of the list should be aware that this is definitely not a comprehensive list of chorales used in Bach's works. There are many instances of CM's in choruses, arias, recitatives and even chorales not listed in the Breitkopf collection. Furthermore, CM's can also be found in many of Bach's non-vocal works, especially the chorale preludes for organ. The CT associated with a Chorale in Breitkopf list might also appear in other places in Bach's vocal works, sometimes in a paraphrased form, with the Breitkopf-associated CM, or with another CM, or without CM at all. To find all the instances of a CM or a CT, simply take a look the relevant CM or CT page.

I hope you would find the article and the list useful.

As usual, suggestions for corrections, additions and/or improvement, would be most welcome.

 

Capella Scores of Bach's Vocal Works

Aryeh Oron wrote (September 24, 2006):
Tobias Schölkopf, webmaster of Tobi's Notenarchiv: http://www.tobis-notenarchiv.de/ approved presenting the Capella scores of Bach's vocal works from his website at the Bach Cantatas Website (BCW).

In the absence of the full BGA scores (due to copyright of the PDF files) and the NBA scores (still protected by copyright) I hope that the Capella scores will do. The main problem is that these scores are not complete yet. For many works only several mvts. are presented. I hope that in time more and more files would be added.

You can find them all through the Index to Scores pages of the BCW, starting at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Scores/index.htm
To view or print the Capella scores you need Capella Reader, which can be freely download according to the simple instructions at the page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Scores/Cap.htm
[you can find a link to this page near the link to every Capella score presented at the BCW]

In the Index to Scores pages you have also links to the reduced Vocal & Piano Scores of the Sacred Cantatas BWV 1-199, and the Scores of the Chorales. Please notice that the pages of the Cantatas and the Other Vocal Works pages (the orange area at the header of each page) have not yet been updated to include links to the new Capella scores. I need some time to accomplish this task, but eventually it will be done.

 

WTC 1 - 85 X 24

Aryeh Oron wrote (December 15, 2006):
Following the discographies of the Inventions & Sinfonias BWV 772-801, the Goldberg Variations BWV 988, the 4 Duets BWV 802-805, and Die Kunst der Fuge BWV 1080, I have added now a comprehensive discography of the Well-Tempered Clavier Book I, BWV 846-869 (WTC 1).

I have used every possible source I could find, including websites as J.S. Bach Home Page and All Music Guide, web-stores as Amazon, JPC and CD Universe, and other websites I have been able to find with Google search engine, as well as various catalogues and my private collection. The only web discography of WTC 1 I found was at the University of Albany and it is actually only a list with many items missing. Therefore I believe that this is the first time such an attempt to present a comprehensive discography of WTC 1 is made, at least on the web.

You can find the list of complete recordings of the WTC 1 split into several pages, a page for a decade, starting at the page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV846-869.htm

All in all, 85 complete (or near complete) recordings of the WTC 1 are listed. As with previous discographies presented at the BCW, each recording is listed only once. All the issues of each recording are presented together. If a performer has recorded WTC 1 more than once, the info includes also the recording number.

I have not yet compiled the discussions of WTC 1 (some hundreds messages of this work in my archive). It would take some time, and there are other projects of higher priority.

If you are aware of a recording of WTC 1 not listed in these pages, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address.

 

Discographies & Biographies of Keyboard Players at the BCW

Aryeh Oron wrote (December 18, 2006):
During the last couple of months I have started adding to the BCW discographies and biographies of keyboard players (harpsichord, piano, clavichord, fortepiano, etc.), who have recorded albums of Bach's non-vocal works. The only criteria used for building a discography page, is that the artist has recorded at least 2 albums of Bach's non-vocal works.

All the recordings of Bach's non-vocal works by the artist are listed in his discography page. Usually they are split into categories: keyboard works, chamber works, orchestral works, MO & AOF, box sets. In each category the recordings are presented more or less chronologically, according to recording date. In case the artist has recorded also Bach's organ works (T. Koopman, H. Walcha, K. Richter, etc.), these recordings are also presented. In case the artist has also recorded Bach's vocal works, they are listed in his bio or in the pages dedicated to these recordings already existed at the BCW (K. Richter and T. Koopman again, M. Suzuki, P. Watchorn, etc.).

As in previous discographies in the BCW, each recording is listed only once. All the issues of each recording are presented together. If a performer has recorded a certain work more than once, the info includes also the recording number. I have tried to avoid duplications as much as I could, and usually collections are not presented, unless they include recordings not available elsewhere.

The info presented for each recording is:
Album: Title, label, TT, front cover photo.
List of works, including for each: BWV, title, recording date & place, TT.
List of performers, including for each: name, instrument, works in which he takes part.

I have used every possible source I could find, including websites as J.S. Bach Home Page, All Music Guide and MusicWeb, web-stores as Amazon, JPC, Tower and CD Universe, websites of the artists,and other websites I have been able to find with Google search engine, as well as various catalogues and my private collection. I believe that this is the first time such an attempt to present comprehensive Bach discographies of keyboard players, at least on the web.

All in all, about 200 artists and some thousands of recordings are presented. Among them are familiar names, such as A. Hewitt, G. Gould, C. Jaccottet, Sv. Richter, etc, as well as many lesser-known figures. You can find them all through the "Bach's Non-vocal Works - Index to Recordings, Reviews & Discussions" starting at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVP/index.htm

If you are aware of an artist who meets the criteria above and does not have a discography page, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address. Teddy Kaufman was of great help by sending me input for many artists. I hope you will help me making this new section of the BCW even more comprehensive that it is now. After all, this is only the initial version.

 

Musical Offering for the New Year

Aryeh Oron wrote (December 25, 2006):
Discography

Following previous discographies of Bach's non-vocal works, I have added now a comprehensive discography of the Musical Offering BWV 1079 (MO), which, AFAIK, is the first ever web-discography of this work.

I have used every possible source I could find, including web-catalogues as J.S. Bach Home Page and All Music Guide, web-stores as Amazon, JPC, CD Universe and eBay, web-magazines as Gramophone and MusicWeb, and other websites I have been able to find with Google search engine, as well as various printed catalogues and my private collection.

As with previous discographies at the BCW, the complete recordings of the MO are split into several pages, a page for a decade. Since there are many individual recordings of the Trio Sonata from the MO, as well as the 2 Ricercars, which are not part of complete recordings of this work, I have also created pages for them. In 1935 Anton Webern orchestrated the 2nd Ricercar [Fuga (Ricercata) a 6 voci], the recordings of which were put into a separate page. Previous discussions of the MO have also been compiled into Discussions page. You can find them all through the main page of the MO at the BCW:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV1079.htm

This initial version of the discography includes 57 complete (or near complete) recordings of the MO, 16 of the Trio Sonata, 36 of the Ricercars and 10 of the Webern's Ricercar. As in previous discographies in the BCW, each recording is listed only once. All the issues of each recording are presented together. If a performer has recorded the MO more than once, the info includes also the recording number. Nevertheless, I am quite certain that there are somewhere recordings I have missed, and for many recordings, especially from the 1960's and 1970's, the info presented is only partial. Please help me making this discography more comprehensive and more accurate. If you are aware of a recording of the MO not listed in these pages, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address.

Background

Taka Kidokoro wrote a good short description of the MO and the background to its composition in the liner notes of DVD, which contains a live recording of the chamber music concert given in July 2000 as part of the Leipzig Bach Festival. It was performed by the Kuijken Brothers exactly on the 250th anniversary of J.S. Bach's death.

Bach's late masterpiece The Musical Offering (1747) is music of homage written on the occasion of Bach's visit to King Frederick the Great of Prussia. By that time, the choirmaster and organist at St. Thomas's Church in Leipzig was already enjoying considerable recognition in Saxony and Thuringia, and his circle of admirers and, in some cases, patrons was beginning to grow. One of these admirers was the Russian ambassador to Prussia, Hermann Carl von Keyserlingk. The Count, who is regarded as having commissioned the Goldberg Variations, referred the king to the Leipzig musician. As a result of this referral, Bach received an official invitation from the Prussian court.

Bach gladly accepted the offer, and the reason for this decision must have been the honour and fame accorded him by the audience. But a personal motive certainly played a part in it too: his second son Carl Philipp Emanuel had been active as royal harpsichordist at the Prussian court since 1740, and in 1745 a son was born to him, Bach's first grandchild. The grandfather probably used the audience as an opportunity for a family reunion as well. Thus it was on May 7, 1747, accompanied by his first son Wilhelm Friedemann, that he arrived in Potsdam. It is conjectured that the meeting took place not in the newly built Sanssouci, but the city castle. On learning of Bach's arrival, the king is said to have announced to those present "with a kind of disquiet": "Gentlemen, old Bach has arrived!"

The king immediately led him to one of the Silbermann fortepianos spread out among various rooms of the castle and asked for an improvisation on a theme set by him. Bach performed this with an artistic fugue à 3, eliciting all-round admiration in the process. The next day, the king again demanded a six-part prelude on the same theme. Bach felt less than sure about the task and played a six-part fugue on a different (more suitable) theme. Although the playing was of an "equally magnificent and learned nature" (Forkel/Wilhelm Friedemann Bach), the composer felt that he had offered a less than satisfactory service. There and then he resolved "to elaborate this right regal theme more perfectly, and thereafter to make it known to the world". That was the basis of his Musical Offering.

Straight after the trip Bach began work on the composition. Work went really swiftly, the oeuvre being completed by 7 July and then sent to Potsdam in the form of a special volume destined for the king. Following that, in September of the same year, Bach had the music printed. The first edition consisted of 100 copies. The entire labour, from composition to printing, took only a matter of months, which testifies to Bach's special ambition to do justice to the self-appointed task. The Musical Offering is a rare blend of different chamber music pieces with two ricercares (three or six-part fugues), a trio sonata and ten elaborate canons. The "thema regium" forms the basis for all these numbers, and the first ricercare à 3 is a transcription of the extemporisation performed in Potsdam. The renowned Bach researcher Christoph Wolff claims that the score dedicated to the king originally contained only this piece and seven additional canons. However, this would mean that Bach decided relatively late on to write the fugue not performed in Potsdam.

Yet it is hard to imagine that he refrained from sending the desired six-part fugue and only penned it after the event to coincide with the printing of the score.

At any rate, the score of The Musical Offering presents us with various problems of performance technique. The printed music - possibly owing to lack of time - is singly bound, and the exact sequence intended by the composer is therefore not known. Uncertainty also surrounds the orchestration. Of the entire composition, only a handful of parts are provided with directions for orchestration: trio sonata and canon perpetuus with transverse flute, violin and basso continuo, canon à 2 violini in unisono with two violins and bass (played in the present recording on violin and harpsichord, however). Above all, the sequence fuelled discussion, and even today there is still no clear-cut insight into the order.

Bach's intentions can be recognised at every turn of the orchestration, however. 1n this work he is trying to accommodate the practical facilities available to the musical king. The four-movement trio sonata is chamber music with flute, as mentioned; the himself played this instrument and frequently made music at the court. With a contemplative andante Bach takes on the then fashionable "sentimental style" of Carl Philipp Emanuel or Graun and thereby does justice to the rococo-like taste of the king. 1n the present recording, the ricercare a 6 is also played in the orchestration of the trio sonata, lucidly conjuring up the picture of the musical soiree at the Prussian court.

 

The 14 Canons BWV 1087 - Discography

Aryeh Oron wrote (December 29, 2006):
In 1974 a published copy of the Goldberg Variations BWV 988, first owned by Bach himself, was discovered in private possession in France. Accompanying the manuscript, in Bach's hand, there was attached a single page with 14 Canons on the first eight bass notes from the Aria of the Goldberg Variations. The discovery of the hitherto unknown manuscript was immediately hailed as the most important addition of a Bach source in recent decades. Among those canons, the 11th and the 13th are a sort of first version of BWV 1077 and BWV 1076, which is included in the famous portrait of Bach painted by Elias Gottlob Haussmann in 1746. All 14 Canons first appeared in print published by Bärenreiter in 1976, and the NBA assigned this group a collective number of BWV 1087.

The 14 Canons are a late contrapuntal work, composed most probably after 1745. They are delightful to hear, but they are important also for other reasons. They represent a germinal stage of the mature variations that is highly instructive as to compositional processes that Bach may have used. This canon cycle bridges the gap between the canons of the Goldberg Variations BWV 988 (1741-1742) and the more esoteric canons of the Musical Offering BWV 1079 (1747). Finally, the enigmatic notations of the 14 Canons represent Bach's affinity for musical riddles and cryptographic symbols.

Following previous discographies of Bach's non-vocal works, I have added now a comprehensive discography of the 14 Canons BWV 1087. As previously, I have used every possible source I could find, including web-catalogues, web-stores, web-magazines, and other websites, as well as various printed catalogues and my personal collection.

Since no recording of the 14 Canons was possible before 1976, I compiled all the known recordings into a single page. You can find them all through the main page of BWV 1087 at the BCW:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV1087.htm
This page includes as usual internal links to reviews & discussions, as well as external links to other pages about this work. The intro above is based on the info found in some of the eternal pages.

There is an open question about the premiere recording of this work. Yuji Takahashi, who recorded them on synthesizer in October 1976, claims to be the first. According to AMG, Casals' recording in an arrangement by Rudolf Serkin from the Marlboro Festival of 1975 was the first. Other sources say it was the 1976 festival. Another recording, by the duo-harpsichordists Junghanns & Tracey, was recorded in 1975 according to J.S. Bach Home Page. Since I do not have at my disposal either of these recordings I cannot check and verify the claimed facts.

I have found 15 complete recordings of the 14 Canons. I am not aware of any recording of individual canons from BWV 1087. If you are aware of a recording of the 14 Canons not listed in the discography, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address.

Last, I would like to share with you a personal experience. Yesterday I attended a concert of the Goldberg Variations, played on piano by Wang Xiaohan. Before the concert Prof. Arie Vardi gave a lecture about the GV, in which the 14 Canons were briefly mentioned. After the pianist finished playing the GV, he was called to give an encore. He chose to play Ravel's Pavane rather than the 14 Canons. Maybe it is only me who cannot hear Ravel after the spiritual experience of the GV. Shouldn't it become the norm to play the 14 Canons after the GV as an encore? I wonder.

Enjoy and Happy New Year to you all,

 

The other Canons BWV 1072-1078, BWV 1087 - Discography

Aryeh Oron wrote (December 30, 2006):
I would like to thank all members who responded to my announcement of the 14 Canons BWV 1087 discography. Following your feedback, I have added a complementary discography, which includes the other Canons BWV 1072-1078 & BWV 1086. Two of them are later versions of canons from the BWV 1087 collection: BWV 1077 of the 11th and BWV 1076 of the 13th. The latter is included in the famous portrait of Bach painted by Elias Gottlob Haussmann in 1746.

As previously, I have used every possible source I could find, including web-catalogues, web-stores, web-magazines, and other websites, as well as various printed catalogues and my personal collection. In my searches I have found 4 more recordings of BWV 1087. The discography of the 14 Canons was updated accordingly. In an old German catalogue I found that the recording by Jörg Ewald Dähler and his ensemble, mentioned by Brad, is actually of the Canon BWV 1076 and not of 14 Canons BWV 1087.

You can find the 6 recordings of the other canons, through the main page of BWV 1072-1078 & BWV 1086 at the BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV1087.htm
This page includes as usual internal links to reviews & discussions, as well as external links to other pages about this work.

If you are aware of a recording of the other canons not listed in the discography, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address.

Enjoy and Happy New Year to you all,

 

Before the Year End - The English are coming

Aryeh Oron wrote (December 31, 2006):
Following previous discographies of Bach's keyboard works (I&S, GV, Duets, WTC 1), I have added now a comprehensive discography of the English Suites BWV 806-811 (ES). Actually I had started working on this discography almost three years ago, but left it in the middle because other projects kept me busy. Now it is finished, at least the initial version of the first ever web-discography of this group of lovely works

As previously, I have used every possible source I could find, including web-catalogues, web-stores, web-magazines, and other websites, as well as various printed catalogues and my personal collection.

You can find the list of recordings of the ES split into several pages, a page for a decade, through the main page of BWV 806-811 at the BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/BWV806-811.htm
This page includes, as usual, internal links to reviews & discussions, as well as external links to other pages about this work.

The list includes both recordings of complete sets (all 6 suites) and recordings of individual suites. Recordings of individual movements are not included. All in all, 97 albums with the ES are listed. As in previous discographies in the BCW, each recording is listed only once. All the issues of each recording are presented together. If a performer has recorded the ES more than once, the info includes also the recording number.

Please also notice that for most albums there is a link at the cell of the album title. This link takes you to the page of the soloist, in which you can find other Bach recordings by this artist.

If you are aware of a recording of the ES not listed in these pages, or if you find an error or missing information, please inform me, either through the BRML or to my personal e-mail address.

Happy New Year!

 

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Last update: ýFebruary 1, 2011 ý14:21:43