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Bach-F. Chopin
Bach-inspired Piano Works by Frédéric Chopin

Contents

Bach-inspired Piano Works: Works
Bach-inspired Piano Works: Links
Recordings of Bach-inspired Piano Works

Frédéric Chopin - Short Biography

Works

Work

No.

Year

Fugue in A minor, for piano
Duration: 2:40 min
Publisher: Peters International
Published: 1898

B. 144
KKIVc/2

1840-1841

Even though Chopin always gave the highest appreciation to J.S. Bach, he did not devote to this classical form without any modification. Chopin did not have a fugue part after each prelude in his series of preludes Op.28. This unique Fugue has two voices. Unlike Robert Schumann or Felix Mendelssohn who was obsessed with fugue usage in piano quintets and symphonies, Chopin attempted this only fugue to pay homage to J.S. Bach, not to promote or develop it into another stage. However, Chopin's fugue was less structured and more melodic like in F. Mendelssohn's and other post-classical's fugues.
Source:
Chopin, The Poet of Piano: Music Analysis: Fantasias, Fugue, Funeral March, Galop Marquis

   

This simple piece composed by Chopin in circa 1840 to 1841 is what many musicians consider as Chopin's only fugue that he wrote in his lifetime, and that the fugue was Chopin's homage to J.S. Bach after finding J.S. Bach's 48 Preludes and Fugues enjoyable. Chopin was an admirer of J.S. Bach, apparently intending the work as an exercise.
The work contains a hidden BACH motif in mesasure 12:

   

   

Preludes Nos. 1-24, for piano

Op. 28

1838-1839

The claim is not infrequently made that the preludes were inspired by those of J.S. Bachís Well-Tempered Clavier. There may well be some truth to this statement. Chopin is known to have admired this masterpiece for its perfection of form and harmony, and is rumored to have pored over it in the months before his first prelude was composed. However, even if this is the case, there are crucial differences present that emphasize that Chopin was no mere derivative or acolyte of J.S. Bach. Firstly, most importantly, the precise mathematically calculated perfection of form and harmony in J.S. Bach's preludes is broken here. It is instead replaced by more Chopin-esque harmonies and an abundance of whatever it is that makes Chopinís music so special and timeless. Secondly, the arrangement of the preludes is different. In the WTC, the preludes are arranged chromatically - No. 1 is in C major, No. 2 in C minor, No. 3 in C-sharp major, No. 4 in C-sharp minor, and so on. Chopinís preludes are instead arranged based on the circle of fifths Ė No. 1 is in C major, No. 2 in A minor, No. 3 in G major, No. 4 in E minor, and so on.
Source:
Chopin, The Poet of Piano: Music Analysis: Preludes

   
     

Links

Title

Description

Author/Webmaster

Preludes

Analysis

Chopin Music

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Prepared by Aryeh Oron (August 2011 - June 2015)

Frédéric Chopin: Short Biography | Bach-inspired Piano Works: Works | Recordings


Piano Transcriptions: Composer/Arranger: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z
BWV Number: Cantatas | Other Vocal | Organ | Chorale Preludes | Keyboard | Solo Instrumental | Chamber | Ensemble & Orchestral | MO & AOF | Name BACH & Bach-Inspired
Discussions: Part 1 | Links | Other Arrangements/Transcriptions


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