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Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

Sinfonia in D major BWV 1045
Discussions - Part 1

BWV 1045

Juozas Rimas (September 23, 2002):
My first encounter with Bach's cantatas a couple of years ago was, surprisingly, not a vocal work (maybe not even by Bach?). It's titled "Concerto D-dur, Fragment einer Einleitungssinfonie zu einer bekannten Kantate", BWV 1045.

What is known about this work? Is it really by JSB? Is it really a sinfonia from an unknown cantata?

It includes a very interesting, almost funny violin part - the violin produces weird creaking sounds, "building-up" for the several culminations of the composition. The work itself is quite long, consisting of several segments - all rich, lush, never a dull moment.

I listened to BWV 1045 in the LP with Gidon Kremer playing the violin (the LP is very rare as it was published in 1978 in Melodya label in Russia). Kremer is a fine violinist and he does a good job in the whole LP which includes, besides BWV1045, Concerto in E Major for Violin and Orchestra and the orchestrated version of Sonata in E Minor for Violin and Figured Bass.

Thomas Braatz wrote (September 24, 2002):
[To Juozas Rimas] I’ll try to answer your questions based on the NBA I/34 KB which appeared in 1990. Here are some important points made in the KB:

The Autograph Score (Fragment):

1) The autograph score has some of the typical features that one would expect from a Bach manuscript. Even the title implies that this was intended for use in a church service:

“J. J. Concerto à 4 Voci. 3 Trombe, Tamburi, 2 Hautb: Violino Conc: 2 Violini, Viola | e Cont.” with the subtitle: “Sinfonia” [The “J. J. Concerto à 4 Voci.” indicate clearly that 4 voices were eventually to appear and “J.J. Concerto” places this composition into the category of church music.]

Problem: Church cantatas almost always have a designation of the particular Sunday or feast day within the liturgical year, but, most important of all, a title (usually based on the 1st line of text (the ‘incipit’) that the voices sing) appears before the listing of the instruments involved.

It is impossible to determine for which occasion this piece was composed.

2) The watermark of the paper (a crowned posthorn on a path or little bridge) was used by a papermill, Ocker in the Harz Mt. region, from 1737 to 1766.

3) The handwriting used on the score has been identified as being Bach’s own. It is even possible to determine the year when Bach composed the score by comparing with other manuscripts that exist. The year is circa 1742.

Problem: The handwriting varies within the score and includes one of the few, rare examples where Bach combines the light, somewhat careless style which he uses when composing directly to paper for the first time with the clean (very few, if any errors), deliberate style that he uses when copying from another source (either an earlier version of his, or that of another composer’s work that he is transcribing.) Here the trumpet, timpani, and oboe parts display the former, while the strings and continuo, but very particularly, the solo violin part, are absolutely clear (a perfect copy by Bach without almost any errors) and include very many articulation marks as well. This leads to the suspicion that Bach is copying from the score of a violin concerto and had decided to add the wind parts later. (Remember how Bach took the 3rd Brandenburg Concerto and added wind parts to that as well when he needed an opening sinfonia for a church cantata, BWV 174!) The arguments regarding the original source have not been answered by the NBA KB editors. They leave the question open as they point to an article by Rudolf Stephan, “Die Wandlung der Konzertform bei Bach” which appeared in the journal, Musikforschung 6, p. 143, in 1953, where Stephan, based on stylistic comparison, expresses doubts about the Bach’s authorship of this piece. They also point to an article by Ralph Leavis, “Zur Frage der Authentizität von Bachs Violinkonzert d-moll,” contained in the Bach Journal, 1979, pp. 25-27. In this article Leavis tries to prove that this is Bach’s transcription/reworking of a violin concerto by a different, unknown composer. [We have two against Bach's reworking of one of his own earlier concerti, and the NBA is unwilling or unable to provide any evidence to the contrary.]

4) There are some problems regarding the provenance of this autograph score, but these are rather unimportant considering all the scrutiny that this score has undergone during the past half century. The score is in the BB.

5) Not only the cantata is a fragment here, but the only extant mvt. is a fragment also – the final measure and a half were completed by an unknown, unidentifiable hand.

6) It appears that Bach never completed this cantata. There is no evidence whatsoever of other mvts. or even a connection with another cantata where this may have served as a replacement for an already existing sinfonia. The lack of an original set of parts may also point to the fact that it was never performed during Bach’s lifetime.

 

Bach's Trumpet Parts (particularly for BWV 1045)

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 16, 2009):
Please forgive my gushing about this piece- I am preparing a performing edition of BWV 1045, one of my absolute favorites, in particular because of the trumpet parts. I always knew it was a high part, but until I started working with the sources and seeing the music-- I was just astonished at how high the trumpet is. While it's one thing to talk about how high the part is, it's quite another to see it: at bar 15, behold that wonderful D (sounds E): http://www.christophgraupner.info/bach/BWV1045/1st-trumpet-BWV1045.JPG

I've made a clip of the opening bars for you to listen as well: http://www.christophgraupner.info/bach/BWV1045/BWV1045-Opening.mp3
You'll hear the trumpets accentuating that chord at the 00:28, 00:30, and 00:32 second marks.

This sinfonia/Violin Concerto was from a rather late cantata (1740s), and in fact is more than likely the last known surviving cantata movement Bach wrote (according to sources I've read). So you have to wonder, who was the fantastic trumpet player that played this; and this piece is a great example of Bach's unique writing for the trumpet (there are plenty of other ones, but this one is so unsual for a violin concerto).

John Pike wrote (January 16, 2009):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] Great stuff. I will listen to a full recording tonight.

Neil Halliday wrote (January 16, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
>While it's one thing to talk about how high the part is, it's quite another to see it: at bar 15, behold that wonderful D (sounds E):<
Isn't that an E, the 3rd note of the A (bar 13), C# (bar 14), E (bar 15) triad? (Some of the bar lines and ledger lines in the score example appear to be missing). In fact the music sounds as written, at baroque pitch (confusing, because the trumpet is a transposing instrument).

I'm astounded that a 'violin concerto in D major' has such prominent trumpets and drums! Uplifting music.

Thanks for the link.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 16, 2009):
Neil Halliday wrote:
< Isn't that an E, the 3rd note of the A (bar 13), C# (bar 14), E (bar 15) triad? (Some of the bar lines and ledger lines in the score example appear to be missing). In fact the music sounds as written, at baroque pitch (confusing, because the trumpet is a transposing instrument). >
Isn't that exactly what I said? I transposed the trumpet part (it's not a score) to make the highness of the note more apparent visually for those that didn't understand the transposing nature of the instrument (that meant in the original source the note was a "D", but when played it sounds as if it's a "E," which is I originally said). There isn't anything missing in the trumpet part. You will notice missing bar lines if you don't expand the jpeg in your web browser(well at least that's the case in I.E.; other browsers, your mileage may vary ;).

< I'm astounded that a 'violin concerto in D major' has such prominent trumpets and drums! Uplmusic. >
Francesca Maria Veracini wrote a highly ornate Violin Concerto for a state visit by the Austrian Emperor to Venice around 1710, with very high trumpet parts and timpani, but that is the only violin concerto from the baroque that I know that comes even remotely to being like this Bach piece; and I doubt if Bach knew of it.

Neil Halliday wrote (January 17, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
>Isn't that exactly what I said?<
Aha! (coming to grips with the transposing process); the trumpet part was written in C major, but sounds in D major, and you have transposed it into D major [the (written) G, B, D 'triad' sounds A, C#, E].

BTW, the highest trumpet note in the 2nd Brandenburg (trumpet in F) is also written 'D' but sounds an even higher 'G' (compared to the E in the violin concerto)!

John Pike wrote (January 17, 2009):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] According to the Kleine BWV, Kobayashi dates this fragment to 1743-46.

The mp3 makes it sound like a superb piece but what recordings are there of it?

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 17, 2009):
[To John Pike] The Bach cantata website has a wee bit of discussion about this particular piece: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV1045-D.htm

I do believe that the cantata was completed, but the score had the violin concerto pulled out for some reason and the rest of the cantata was lost.

and a complete listing of performances here: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV1045.htm

The sample I used, is from the Ton Koopman recording [7] from his cantata edition. I didn't even know about this piece until I heard the Max Pommer recording [4] in the early 1990s. It's a fantastic recording, although the grunting and sighing of a performer is a wee bit annoying.

John Pike wrote (January 17, 2009):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] I discovered I had a recording in the Hänssler Complete Bach edition [6] and I have been listening to it avidly all day....it is just superb. I have had this edition on my bookshelves for several years and had thought that I had heard all Bach's music at some time or other, (most of it not in the Hänssler edition). That disc also includes the reconstructed violin concertos, which I hadn't heard either, at least not in the reconstructed form.

I can't tell you how thrilled I am to have discovered this piece in particular, and indeed the whole disc, so very many thanks indeed for raising the topic.

The combination of a fiendish solo violin part and those 3 trumpets is just indescribably wonderful....my discovery of the week/month/year/millennium. Makes me want to borrow Ed's Hawaiian shirt and dance the streets.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 17, 2009):
John Pike wrote:
< I discovered I had a recording in the Haenssler Complete Bach edition [6] and I have been listening to it avidly all day....it is just superb. I have had this edition on my bookshelves for several years and had thought that I had heard all Bach's music at some time or other, (most of it not in the Hänssler edition). >
I'm so glad you were able to listen ;) What's a great way to compliment that Sinfonia/Violin Concerto is follow that up by listening to the opening chorus to BWV 129. I have a hunch that the opening chorus to the missing cantata BWV 1045 was yanked from would have sounded something like this piece (that's just absolutely pure
speculation on my part, I have no evidence for it whatsoever).


< That disc also includes the reconstructed violin concertos, which I hadn't heard either, at least not in the reconstructed form. >
It's a great CD, I love the accoustics for those Max Pommer recordings [4], they have a very "live" acoustic, it's hard to describe, but I always loved it.

< I can't tell you how thrilled I am to have discovered this piece in particular, and indeed the whole disc, so very many thanks indeed for raising the topic.
The combination of a fiendish solo violin part and those 3 trumpets is just indescribably wonderful....my discovery of the week/month/year/millennium. Makes me want to borrow Ed's Hawaiian shirt and dance the streets. >
I have a few Hawaiian shirts if you need any ;)

The violin part IS hard, maybe that's why even on the Koopman version [7] I believe I hear the soloist grunting a bit. I can tell you it's a bit of a chore working on this piece in Sibelius engraving software, it's a long manuscript source, about 32 pages with 11 staves per page. Again I'm glad you are enjoying the music so much!

Ed Myskowski wrote (January 18, 2009):
John Pike wrote:
>Makes me want to borrow Ed's Hawaiian shirt and dance the streets.<
Actually, John, I have a significant collection, about a half dozen of which (including three Reyn Spooner Limited Edition Xmas, Mele Kalikimaka) I consider special treasures. Other than that, you could have your choice of more than twenty for a dancing event. One size only, unfortunately, 117 cm chest, generous L to smallish XL. Loan is free, you pay round trip shipping.

Aloha (shirt, singular, I can only wear them one at a time, and all), Ed Myskowski

John Pike wrote (January 18, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< The violin part IS hard, maybe that's why even on the Koopman version [7] I believe I hear the soloist grunting a bit. I can tell you it's a bit of a chore working on this piece in Sibelius engraving software, it's a long manuscript source, about 32 pages with 11 staves per page. Again I'm glad you are enjoying the music so much! >
JP. It sounds as if it doesn't lie at all easily under the fingers and it is quite relentless...so many arpeggios. There are two arpeggio sections in the Chaconne, but they lie reasonably easily under the fingers, and there are moments of respite in the Chaconne. in this piece, it seems pretty relentless all the way through.

Please let me know when your edition is available commercially. I'll give it a go and see if my suspicions are founded!

John Pike wrote (January 18, 2009):
[To Ed Myskowski] Many thanks to Ed and Kim for kind offers! I'll bear them in mind.

William Hoffman wrote (January 18, 2009):
BWV 1045 et al Trumpet

Our recent discussion to close the cycle omitted this work written apparently for the church in the 1740s. I think It could possibly have been for an annual performance of the inauguration of the Town Council in late August at the St. Nikolas Church. We have a record of performances almost every year in the 1720s, then the record, while Bach directed the Collegium musicum is sketchy, like everything else. There is a lost Town Council cantata for 1740, BWV Anh. 193, Herrscher des Himmels, text only, and a revival of BWV Anh. 4, Wuenschet Jerusalem Gluck," in 1741, about the time Zimmerman died and Bach ceased his Collegium musicum activities. However, we have revivals of BWV 69(a) and BWV 29 in 1748 and 1749 respectively, showing that old Bach was still kicking and rendering unto Caesar.

Bach published only one cantata, BWV 71, for the Mühlhausen Town Council annual installation in 1708, a marvelous early work, beating Handel to the punch! Then Bach was invited back from Weimar for the annual event in 1709 with BWV Anh. 192, possibly including the sacred chorus, "Das Lamm, das erwueget ist" ("Worthy is the Lamb"; BWV 21/11), a marvelous piece with trumpets and drums.

Some of Bach's Leipzig Town Council cantatas have wonderful sinfonias (a genre that Bach reworked often, most notably opening BWV 119 in 1723, an original French Overture (shades of Orchestral Suites 3 and 4) and another marvelous adaptat, BWV 29/1 Sinfonia, adapted from the solo violin partita in Eb, Preludio, BWV 1006/1 with a festive orchestra including organ, trumpets and drums.

In conclusion, BWV 1045a ranks with BWV 119/1 and BWV 29/1, as well as other Bach sinfonias and cantata introductions with trumpets and drums: BWV 31/1, BWV 110/1, BWV 249/1, BWV 207/7, and BWV 248/1, 43, and 54=248a/1 -- the last possibly from a lost town council cantata of 1734.

Just a few bits of collateral evidence to support my thought!

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 18, 2009):
John Pike wrote:
> JP. It sounds as if it doesn't lie at all easily under the fingers and it is quite relentless...so many arpeggios. There are two arpeggio sections in the Chaconne, but they lie reasonably easily under the fingers, and there are moments of respite in the Chaconne. in this piece, it seems pretty relentless all the way through.> Please let me know when your edition is available commercially. I'll give it a go and see if my suspicions are founded! <
I have posted a PDF of the solo violin part for you in the following directory:
http://www.christophgraupner.info/bach/BWV1045/

I'm not finished yet, but hopefully this will give you some idea of what's involved playing the music; I haven't written out the chord/arpeggios because violin players have their own preferences on how to read the notes.

I'll definitely keep you posted as I get this done.

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 18, 2009):
BWV 1045 - Provenance

Thomas Braatz contributed Provenance page to the discussion of BWV 1045.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Ref/BWV1045-Ref.htm

John Pike wrote (January 18, 2009):
[To Aryeh Oron] Many thanks to Thomas for this.

Incidentally, when I first tried to find material on this work on the BCW I followed the link on the front page, ie. Instrumental works, and then found the heading:
Concertos for Instruments & Orchestra BWV 1044-1045
But this is not a link, and I assumed that there was as yet no material in this section. I was wrong. Maybe this heading could now be converted to a hypertext link to the relevant material.

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 18, 2009):
[To John Pike] BWV 1045 is now considered as a Sinfonia from a lost cantata.
See the commentary page, derived from Durr's book 'The Cantatas of J.S. Bach' (Oxford University Press, 2005): http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Guide/BWV1045-Guide.htm
Therefore the work is now listed at the last page of Index to Cantatas.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/IndexBWV5.htm
Following your message, I have also added a link to BWV 1045 main page at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/NVD/index.htm

John Pike wrote (January 18, 2009):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] Many thanks, Kim. As I suspected, the arpeggios in this section do not lie easily under the fingers.

I think you're very wise not to write the arpeggios out in full. Baerenreiter adopt this approach in their edition of the solo violin works (Chaconne), whereas the Galamian edition writes them out in full. I find the latter approach too difficult to read and I can't get a feeling of the overall shape when it's written out in that way. I do not play them as Galamian as written them out anyway. The single arpeggio you have posted in the other file looks like F sharp, D, E in the original. I'll play that bar as it looks in the original and in your edition see how they sound.

Continue of this part of the discussion, see: Trumpets in Bach's Vocal works - Part 7 [General Topics]

Douglas Cowling wrote (January 18, 2009):
BWV 1045 - "Intrada"

[To Aryeh Oron] I'm curious about the use of the term "intrada" in the title:

Intrada o Concerto 3 Trombe, Tamburi, 2 Oboi e 2 Violini Concertanti (underlined twice), Violini, Viola e Basso. Composto da Giov: Sebast: Bach.

I've only encountered intrada as the introductory movement in a suite of dance movements. Are there any other canatas which use the term?

James Atkins Pritchard wrote (January 19, 2009):
[To Douglas Cowling] I don't know that Bach used the term elsewhere, but for what it's worth Gerald Finzi's cantata "Dies Natalis" begins with an intrada.

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 19, 2009):
[To Douglas Cowling & James Atkins Pritchard] Regarding the ongoing discussion, Thomas Braatz has prepared a PDF page with Intrada definition.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Term/IntradaDef.pdf
Linked from: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Term/Terms-4.htm
Tom still has not found any instance where Bach uses this term.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 19, 2009):
[To Aryeh Oron] Just a quick follow-up to that, there is a section on the PDF that mentions that in Italy an Intrada would be used like an ouverture in Germany, but without a fugue.

Christoph Graupner is the only baroque composer I know of that actually wrote "Entrata"s in Germany, four survive in Darmstadt. Graupner does use a fugal center portion, but there are no repeats in the opening movement, unlike the typical ouverture. Telemann used the term for his opening Concerto for 3 Trumpets, Timpani, 2 Oboes and Strings, TWV 54:D3, which was taken from his huge 1716 serenata "Teutschland grünt und blüht im Friede!"

Douglas Cowling wrote (January 19, 2009):
[To Aryeh Oron] "Gott ist mein König" (BWV 71) begins without an instrumental introduction and it has been suggested that it opened with brass piece which may have accompanied the processional entrance of the Town Council. That piece would fill the bill of an "intrada."

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 19, 2009):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< "Gott ist mein König" (BWV 71) begins without an instrumental introduction and it has been suggested that it opened with brass piece which may have accompanied the processional entrance of the Town Council. That piece would fill the bill of an "intrada." >
Very unlikely-- most of those types pieces were composed by the trumpet players (I'm not aware of any pieces surviving by the major baroque composers). What makes this even more unlikely I think is this cantata was published, and there is no intrada either in the print or manuscript sources, plus there is that one cantata with the opening March that survives. If Bach had composed an intrada for this cantata, it would have survived I think.

Douglas Cowling wrote (January 19, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< What makes this even more unlikely I think is this cantata was published, and there is no intrada either in the print or manuscript sources, plus there is that one cantata with the opening March that survives. If Bach had composed an intrada for this cantata, it would have survived I think. >
It's not beyond possibility that someone else's music was played. Maybe there was the Leipzig equivalent of "Hail to the Chief".

I just had an aural vision of the Navy Chorus breaking into "Gott ist Mein Konig" after Obama is sworn in.

By the here are 1821 words which are never sung anymore:

Hail to the Chief we have chosen for the nation,
Hail to the Chief! We salute him, one and all.
Hail to the Chief, as we pledge cooperation
In proud fulfillment of a great, noble call.

Yours is the aim to make this grand country grander,
This you will do, that's our strong, firm belief.
Hail to the one we selected as commander,
Hail to the President! Hail to the Chief!

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 19, 2009):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< By the here are words which are never sung anymore:
Hail to the Chief we have chosen for the nation,
Hail to the Chief! We salute him, one and all.
Hail to the Chief, as we pledge cooperation
In proud fulfillment of a great, noble call.
Yours is the aim to make this grand country grander,
This you will do, that's our strong, firm belief.
Hail to the one we selected as commander,
Hail to the President! Hail to the Chief! >
There is a recording of this vocal version by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

Ed Myskowski wrote (January 19, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
>There is a recording of this vocal version by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.<
MTC? Is that affiliated with the Church of the Latter Day Saints? Are they anything like Lutherans?

All these Christians, one would think they would simply take a long walk in the woods together, pledge cooperation as the song says, and come out with *one God (a Trinity!?), one voice.*

To quote my favorite Jesuit (my former boss): <Are you kidding? It took 2000 years before we could wear short sleeves in summer.>

Lex Schelvis wrote (January 20, 2009):
For cantata BWV 207a Bach composed a entrance march, which Dürr calls an Auszug (a procession? I only have the german publication.) Koopman is playing it on his interpretation of the cantata. When he played it in concert, this piece really was an entrance. All the windplayers (and only the windplayers, the stringplayers already were on the stage) played it while entering the music hall.

Does this look like an intrada?

Paul T. McCain wrote (January 20, 2009):
[To Lex Schelvis] Yes, Auszug would be the word used to describe music played during an entry or exit of groups of people during a ceremony or ritual.

Douglas Cowling wrote (January 20, 2009):
[To Paul T. McCain] Another pseudo-intrada might be the brass introduction to Cantata BWV 118 O Jesu Christ, mein¹s Lebens Licht which appears to be an outdoor funeral motet.

William Hoffman wrote (January 20, 2009):
I believe that stadtpfeifers in Bach's time provided various callings during times of the day and other announcements, such as intradas for an important person's entrance at the Grimma gate. I also believe that the term was in wide use back to the renaissance and middle ages and I think there are some in Carl Orff's works.

The connection to BWV 1045 could relate to the fact that stadtpfeifers (primarily wind players) were municipal employees and participated in Town Council gatherings at the Market Place and Town Hall and were positioned in the bell tower. There must have been a procession with lighting and intradas to the Nicholas Church in late August for the Monday installation vesper service with Bach's Town Council Cantata. Therefore, BWV 1045 could have been an introductory piece to the actual cantata.

Ed Myskowski wrote (January 20, 2009):
William Hoffman wrote:
>The connection to BWV 1045 could relate to the fact that stadtpfeifers (primarily wind players) were municipal employees and participated in Town Council gatherings<
That reminds me of a story. In my high school class (1958) we had a German exchange student, the second in our school, because the class of 1957 guy worked out so well. Those of you who are adept (or even modestly competent) with numbers will calculate that I have recently had my 50th reunion. The bad news is, that means I am pretty old (jr). The good news is, part by happenstance and part by planning, I got to sit between my old clarinet stand mate, and the prettiest girl in the class. Over the course of the evening, with the aid of the catalyst (vino), we figured out that we had three current spouses and nine ex spouses. That should tell you something about pretty girls and/or musicians.

The guy from Germany took the trouble to come all the way over here. We reminisced about the time, fifty years ago, when he nudged me, pointed to someone, and said <He plays the flute!>
<Huh?> I said.
<Oh, I guess that means something different in Geremany>

It was good to see him again, but I enjoyed the prettiest girl in the class, still very attractive for an Old Dudesse (jr), the most.

 

BWV 1045

Bruce Simonson wrote (May 6, 2011):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< ... One frustrating case where a sinfonia was literally ripped out of an unidentified Bach cantata is BWV 1045 > ...
I just looked up BWV 1045 in my digital BG scores, and what a delight. What charm, and I found myself wanting to hear it performed. Even thoughts of adding it to a Christmas program. Kept turning pages ...

Until ... horrors! ... missing measures?!

At least in my BG score; yikes! Sheesh! Vandals!! Apparently Kim was being precise when he said "... literally ripped out ...".

Save me from my wrath. Has the work been defrag'ed since the days of BG?

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (May 6, 2011):
[To Bruce Simonson] Yeah, it's a rather easily recomposed final cadence sequence of about three to five bars, depending on who "finished" it. Koopman has included this in the cantata series he recorded a few years ago.
You can hear a copy of that @ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8Hrp-VRWBg

 

Continue on Part 2

Sinfonia BWV 1045: Details & Recordings | Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2

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